Connecticut Children's Museum
22 Wall St
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 22 Wall St
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 562-5437 x
Fax 203-787-9414
E-mail creatingkids@snet.net
Web and Social Media
Mission

The mission of the Connecticut Children’s Museum is to provide children, their families and teachers with innovative and inclusive educational programs in an arts and literacy-based, multiple intelligences-inspired, magical place, rich in resources and rooted in the community.  Children need a place of their own where they can experience the magic of learning at their own pace, a place full of whimsy and wisdom, a space built to their size and specifications. Early childhood educators need a place where they canlearn, a place where they can find support and inspiration. Families need a place of full of color, joy and community where they can play and learn together. The Children's Building, and all of its programs, is designed to be such a place.

A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.

The Week of the Young Child is an annual event celebrating early learning, young children, their teachers and families.  Every April, the New Haven Early Childhood Council (NHECC) participates in this annual National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) event with a citywide literacy program, The Little Read. In addition to support from the NHECC, the Connecticut Children’s Museum solicits local donors and organizes The Little Read.

The Little Read, modeled after The Big Read, is a literacy initiative where young children and their families across the community are reading a single book title at the same time. Each year, the New Haven Early Childhood Council, working with the Connecticut Children’s Museum, distributes over 3,000 high-quality, bi-lingual picture books to children throughout public and private early childhood classrooms and family childcare homes. Each site hosts a family-friendly event during the national Week of the Young Child.

Every child receives the same book, a book chosen because it highlights an important idea for young children. The family events are creative and inviting; all support the theme culled from the book and bring teachers, parents and children together, as community, to share the joy of reading a wonderful book and to take part in innovative activities linked to the book.

At the conclusion of the Week of the Young Child in April, early childhood sites submit a short report and pictures about their activity that illustrate how The Little Read inspired families and teachers alike to read together and celebrate young children.

We estimate The Little Read books to cost $3 each. We active seek community and donor support for the Week of the Young Child books.

A Great Opportunity Ending Date Apr 30 2018
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1974
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Sandra Malmquist
Board Chair Katharine Goodbody
Board Chair Company Affiliation State of CT Office of Public Defender
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Connecticut Children’s Museum is to provide children, their families and teachers with innovative and inclusive educational programs in an arts and literacy-based, multiple intelligences-inspired, magical place, rich in resources and rooted in the community.  Children need a place of their own where they can experience the magic of learning at their own pace, a place full of whimsy and wisdom, a space built to their size and specifications. Early childhood educators need a place where they canlearn, a place where they can find support and inspiration. Families need a place of full of color, joy and community where they can play and learn together. The Children's Building, and all of its programs, is designed to be such a place.

Background

The Connecticut Children’s Museum was established in 1974 and has served as a children’s museum, a childcare center, a base for outreach programs and a site for a magnet school. When the Board of Directors of the Creating Kids Childcare Center assumed control of the Children’s Building in the summer of 1999, we recognized the importance of this building and its programs to area families and educators. Through a series of community-based ‘Inspiration Evenings’, the organizational acumen of the Museum Renaissance Committee and the work of a dedicated group of local architects, artists and builders, the Connecticut Children’s Museum was re-opened in January of 2001. It is an important strand in the tapestry of the downtown revitalization efforts, drawing thousands of families with young children into New Haven, and serving hundreds of early childhood education programs, annually.

This majestic building, aptly named The Children’s Building, houses myriad children’s programs, all interwoven in purpose and philosophy. The Museum, through its Educational Field Trip program and family visits, serves as an informal learning environment, providing innovative, interactive and inclusive opportunities for each child to be a successful learner and every grown-up to be a brilliant mentor. The Connecticut Children’s Museum is a literacy haven with more than 500 children’s picture books, in many languages, included among its exhibits.  The Creating Kids Childcare Center serves the childcare needs of area families. 

The museum houses the Early Childhood Resource Center that provides weekly professional development workshops and curriculum support for family childcare providers and early childhood educators.

The Museum and its childcare program use Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences as the inspiration and template for their design. This theory honors the many ways in which children are competent and creative in the world and provides families and teachers with a kaleidoscope view of their young children’s passions so that they can lend support to their individual learning patterns. The eight intelligences are mirrored throughout the museum rooms and woven throughout our early childhood education programs, forming the basis for curriculum development. They are: linguistic, logical-mathematical, spatial, musical, interpersonal, intrapersonal, naturalist and bodily-kinesthetic. 

Impact
Our top five accomplishments of 2016:
1.  Opened the new Early Childhood Resource Center providing weekly professional development sessions for early childhood educators and supporting their work with bi-lingual Curriculum Boxes and Story Kits. 
2.  Distributed over 9,000 children's picture books for home libraries, family childcare homes and classrooms through our literacy initiatives.
3.  Secured  funds to provide over 1,500 children from early childhood programs and elementary schools with free field trips to the museum where they received a book and participated in a cultural program, Houses + Homes Around the World or Paint + Print Around the World.  The children learned to construct a home from another land or how to write Chinese Calligraphy and Egyptian hieroglyphs and practiced the artwork of great painters from Mexico, Great Britain and the USA.
4.  Provided high-quality care and education at our Creating Kids Childcare Center.  Secured School Readiness funding to support 35% of preschool children and provided over $40,000 for scholarships.
5.  Secured funds to support Mornings at the Museum, a monthly literacy program for 20 family childcare providers and the 80 children in their collective care.  Each visiting child received a new, bi-lingual children's picture book and their families were provided with customized bookmarks with literacy learning facts to help them be their child's first teacher.
 
Top 3 goals for the coming year:
1.   To implement the community-serving programs listed above at full capacity.
2.   To increase the capacity of the Early Childhood Resource Center to serve 35 early childhood educators at each of the 40 weekly Professional Development events.
3.   To continue to stabilize the budget through innovative fundraising.
 
Needs
1.  To repair and restore our historic building.  The estimated cost to upgrade the building to make it more energy efficient and to restore the exterior is estimated to be $1 million dollars.
2.  To retire our outstanding mortgage debt of $265,000.
3.  To raise additional operating budget funds to support an increase in scholarships to Creating Kids Childcare Center and increase staff compensation.
CEO Statement

As the director of the Connecticut Children's Museum, I am honored to work with a talented and dedicated professional staff who embrace the philosophical goals and implement the programs of the Museum and its early childhood center, Creating Kids. 

The Connecticut Children's Museum occupies a unique niche in New Haven, hosting myriad programs within its walls including educational field trips for children who might not otherwise visit, and providing thousands of books to children to build their home libraries. 
 
Our outreach includes a series of Dual Language Family Literacy Workshops with LULAC's Early Head Start and preschool program families.

In the Creating Kids Childcare Center each day, a sound curriculum is delivered in the most unique ways.  Learning about classic nursery rhymes entails building a wall for Humpty Dumpty while reciting rhymes.  Chinese New Year's is celebrated with authentic food prepared by our families and learning Chinese calligraphy.  Martin Luther King Jr.'s lessons on equality are present as the class gathers to hear his famous speech and the children gain an understanding of things people share as well as the unique attributes of all during Same & Different Week.

The museum Brailles books for children who are blind, combining these with tactile props to bring literacy to life for children with visual impairments.  We assemble the Tool Kits that our partner, All Our Kin, uses to help family childcare providers become licensed, quality childcare settings.  We distribute thousands of books purchased for early childhood programs to celebrate the annual Week of the Young Child.
 
Weekly, dozens of early childhood educators gather for professional development sessions at our newly acquired Early Childhood Resource Center, thrilled to have a place that honors and supports their work.  
 
Young children walk into the great, green room from the children's classic, Goodnight Moon, and hear the story told by heart by loving parents and teachers.  I see the wide-eyed wonder of a child who just discovered that there really is a magical great, green room in the world.  And I am thrilled when a family discovers that the book is here in their home language and I hear "Goodnight, Moon" read in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Hebrew, Spanish or French. 
 
But mostly, I see that so many children are touched by the work being done here.  Each project is enriched with books.  Each project is carefully conceived and crafted to engage families and enchant children. 
 
Every morning I have to remind myself that this is work.  
 
Sandy Malmquist -- Director 
 
Board Chair Statement

I am proud to be part of the Children’s Museum. I have been on the board since 2007 and its chair since 2012. The Children’s Museum is an amazing organization and a wonderful addition to the New Haven community.

The Children’s Museum contributes so much to maintaining and improving early childhood education in the New Haven area. It is an inclusive organization with a physical plant and atmosphere that are accessible to all.

Creating Kids, the Museum’s wonderful childcare center, includes a diverse group of children, including those with special needs. The Museum's many programs, including educational field trips and family child care, introduce thousands of children to the joy of books. The Museum provides books to thousands of children each year including books in Braille.

Further, the Museum provides a place for early childhood educators to receive support and inspiration. Its Creating Curriculum program contributes to the training of early childhood educators throughout the area. The Early Childhood Resource Center likewise provides continuing education to many early childhood providers.

The Museum is a place where families can play together and children can explore and create in a meaningful and interactive way.

It is satisfying to contribute to an institution that is creative and always looking for new ways to meet its goals. The addition of the Early Childhood Resource Center in 2016 is just one example of this.

The continuing challenges the Board of Directors of the Museum faces are those that many non-profits face. These include keeping the physical plant in good condition, paying competitive salaries and providing adequate support to our staff. Grants and contributions are critical to our maintaining our programs.

I am pleased to be part of such an important and vibrant organization.

Katharine Goodbody -- Board Chair

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Education / Preschools
Secondary Organization Category Education /
Areas Served
Ansonia
Branford
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Milford
New Haven
North Haven
Orange
State wide
West Haven
Our many programs draw families from New Haven and all of its surrounding towns as well as from communities across Connecticut.  60% of our participants reside in New Haven with the other 40% coming from nearby towns.  The museum itself draws families from a wide arc around New Haven.
Programs
Description
Creating Kids Childcare Center is a high-quality, early childhood education program for 32 infants through preschool-aged children.  Families are drawn from the City's many neighborhoods and neighboring towns.  Located in a separate wing of the Connecticut Children's Museum, Creating Kids enrolls children in a fulltime program known for its multiple intelligences curriculum implemented within an urban setting.  Creating Kids is an inclusive childcare setting; a cornerstone of its mission is the enrollment of children with special needs.  Brailled books and American Sign Language are integral to our language and literacy teaching.  35% of our preschool children receive significant tuition support through State supported funding and organizational fundraising.
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / People/Families with of People with Disabilities /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
At the end of each weekly curriculum unit, based on the multiple intelligences and the CT Early Learning Development standards, each child is tracked across the benchmarks as defined by the CT Preschool Assessment Framework.  Areas needing support are identified and learning goals developed.  At the end of each year, 100% of our children achieve success in accomplishing the benchmark appropriate for their age.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Creating Kids Childcare Center prepares children from diverse backgrounds and abilities to be lifelong learners, prepared for myriad school settings and learning approaches.  The individuated and innovative teaching curriculum is based on the Theory of Multiple Intelligences, and is informed by the CT Preschool Assessment Framework.  100% of the Creating Kids graduates are prepared for success in kindergarten.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Teachers assess each child each week by comparing the CT Preschool Assessment Framework and its benchmarks with the child's ability to access the curriculum teaching.  Creating Kids is also monitored annually by the School Readiness Program, a statewide funding program for preschool classrooms and by the National Association for the Education of Young Children.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Families report that, upon entering kindergarten, Creating Kids graduates are prepared for the rigor of the academics and are engaged learners.  Having acquired a broad knowledge base through the curriculum at Creating Kids, our children are academically accomplished and avid class participants. 
 
In the words of a Creating Kids parent, "My daughter's joy in being in the classroom is tremendous and ever growing.  She came home during Winter Week, her nose and face painted, exclaiming, 'I'm a polar bear and I can jump to an ice patch!'  She is constantly singing songs and wanting project night.  The early signs of curiosity and engagement are precious to us, as we know the foundations of learning are built on them."
 
 
 
 
 
 
Description

Educational Field Trips are part of our affirmative attendance program, bringing over 3,500 inner-city children, their families and teachers to the Museum each year. The Museum provides a unique educational destination annually for children from early childhood programs, licensed family childcare homes and elementary schools where the exhibits inspire teachers and students. Books are nestled into every exhibit, providing children with a literacy reference.  For example, there are books about bees and beekeeping strategically placed nearby the Naturalist Room's observation beehive to deepen the experience of finding the queen bee and watching the worker bees arrive with pollen.  Each child receives a new, bi-lingual children’s picture book for his or her ‘little library’ at home, thereby extending the experience and building their literacy resources.  Many of our field trips have an international theme, providing children with new knowledge and a connection to children around the world.

Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / People/Families with of People with Disabilities / Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Each Educational Field Trip contributes to the libraries of visiting children and provides them with an out-of-school learning experiences that is exciting and unique.  Pairing that experience with a new, high-quality, bi-lingual children's picture book sends a message about the importance of literacy.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Providing books is a direct response to the dearth of high-quality children’s picture books in homes of our most at-risk children. “The only behavioral measure that correlates significantly with reading scores is the number of books in the home."  Our primary audience is children, ages 0 to 8, who are at risk for low performance in preschool and school. According to the CT Department of Education, the majority of children in our area lives in poverty and in under-resourced neighborhoods, entering kindergarten without the skills or resources they need to be successful students. 60% of our children fail to meet the State’s 3rdgrade standards for reading.  “Home library size has a very substantial effect on educational attainments, even adjusting for parents’ education, father’s occupational status and other family background characteristics.”  Children living in under-resourced homes have 1 book for every 300 children.  Our Educational Field Trip Program addresses this need.


 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The demand for our Educational Field Trip program far outstrips the available trip dates.  Teachers report that the books children receive through our programs are the only high-quality books children have in their homes in their home language.  By pairing books with a cultural experience, such as learning how to dance Salsa or write Chinese calligraphy, the book learning is amplified and takes on another real-life dimension that can be replicated in the home.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Each year, we offer 100 field trip dates to the early childhood and elementary schools to serve approximately 2,700 children.  Each year, we schedule all 100 field trips dates, often within a few weeks of announcing the availability of the Educational Field Trip program.
 
By using a template of internationalism, the field trips appeal to a wide range of children.  Children recognize themselves in the program and often connect their experience to their own lives.  We were particularly touched when the program focused on Egyptian hieroglyphs and the history of writing in the Middle East.  One little girl shared that her family were recent immigrants from Egypt and that this was her home language!  She was so proud to lead her friends in the project to write their names in Egyptian hieroglphs.
Description

Mornings at the Museum brings family childcare providers, and the children they care for, to the Connecticut Children’s Museum for monthly literacy-based field trips. Family childcare providers need teaching materials and access to resources. The program provides a high-quality, bi-lingual children’s picture book for each provider and each of their enrolled children and complementary curriculum materials that correlate with the book to expand the learning opportunities and to enhance the materials in the family childcare setting.   By increasing the provider's resources, children can more readily acquire the skills and knowledge they need to be ready for school.  Family childcare providers work with families, talking with them about the importance of reading and how the book is a tool to help their children develop the strong literacy skills needed to succeed in school and in life.  Families receive a literacy learning fact bookmark that identifies key learning concepts from the book.

Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / Adults /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Providers enjoy the camaraderie of other providers during their monthly excursions, building strong relationships with other family childcare homes.  The children have an opportunity to build friendships with a larger peer group.  Providers learn from museum staff about engaging and interactive book reading, and are committed to replicating those experiences in their settings.  Providers are literacy ambassadors, engaging their families by sharing the book the children receive and highlighting the key learning concept from the book and importance of reading daily with them.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Mornings at the Museum is anchored by the experience of providers, and the children they care for, spending quality time together in the literacy-based and enriching environment of the Connecticut Children's Museum.  It defines early care and education as experiential and relationship-based.  Providers have a cohort of other family childcare-based peers to share information and experiences of their vocation.  Providers and children have access to museum staff as mentors who model play and book reading.  Provider participants are able to build their own libraries over time and children add books to their home collections.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Mornings at the Museum has been funded through local foundations and, most recently, by the NewAlliance Foundation and a donor-designated fund at the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven.  Success is defined in the by clear, delineated goals such as number of providers who participate, the number of books distributed, the number of conversations providers hold with families about reading and the response to the program by families of the children who attend it.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Each year, we establish monthly dates for Mornings at the Museum.  Provider attendance is 85%, a remarkable statistic given that they are preparing, bundling and transporting upwards to 6 children, infants through three years old, for the visit.  With space for just 20 providers, there is a waiting list every year. 
 
In the words of one provider, "Mornings at the Museum jump starts my lesson planning."  Another shared, "Children have access to so many books.  They are also able to play with other children at the program.  We like the curriculum materials, especially the puppets."  And, "I like to follow up on the experience with the curriculum materials the next day."
Description
Saturdays at 2 Creating Readers program is an exciting weekly series of events that weds local artists and children's picture books to form a coherent and compelling literacy initiative.  Artists, actors, educators, musicians and naturalists come to the museum and present a book using their specific talent.  The Creating Readers program supports the creating of competent and confident readers.  Through this program, thousands of children gain access to reading materials and reading experiences and become book owners.  Each participating family receives the book-of-the-day in English, Spanish or in Braille.  The increased access to resources will scaffold emerging literacy skills in children poised to become readers. Creating Readers will do this by providing children with a book linked to their Museum visit, a book associated with the exhibits and linked to the experience of having a story read to them in an innovative, interactive and memorable way. 
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / People/Families with of People with Disabilities / Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
The Saturdays at 2 Creating Readers program is a weekly arts and literacy-based event where children and their families can have fun and learn together.  It provides an exciting destination where hands-on and interactive experiences form the learning landscape.  Our success is measured by the 50 programs we host annually and the attendance of at least 25 families at each event.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Saturdays at 2 Creating Readers employs local artists and educators to read to children using their unique genre of dance, drama, music, science and nature to engage and entertain.  The long-term vision is that children will form a strong connection to stories and build their home libraries with a gift of the Creating Readers book.  Creating Readers fosters a lifelong love of reading.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Saturdays at 2 Creating Readers program is a popular event for area families as documented through our data collection of participating families.  The return rate for visitors is 50% and, as we track families arrival times and by zip code, we know that families schedule their visit to ensure that they can attend the Saturdays at 2 Creating Readers event.  Our weekly eBlast and Facebook postings are viewed by hundreds of families who want information on the literacy program.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Families share that the books their child receive based on the Saturdays at 2 Creating Readers program are favorites, generating family conversations about the dancer, storyteller, musician or actor that read the book aloud at the event.
Description

In the fall of 2016, the Connecticut Children's Museum assumed stewardship of the Early Childhood Resource Center.  We recognize that the quality of care in early childhood programs is directly correlated to the professional development and education of the teaching staff. Teaching staff in classrooms and in family childcare settings need support, professional development opportunities and access to resources to improve and enhance the quality of their programs.  Our vibrant and active Early Childhood Resource Center provides these critical elements of support, education and resources.

The Early Childhood Resource Center provides (1) 40 professional development workshops annually to meet State and local requirements, serving over 1,000 providers, (2) curriculum materials and bi-lingual children's picture books to enhance the quality of curriculum and inspire teachers and (3) a place to gather as early childhood professionals.

 



Population Served Adults / Infants to Preschool (under age 5) /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Early Childhood Resource Center opened in September of 2016.  It has doubled projected attendance with 695 participant visits to date.  100% of participants surveyed report that the sessions are "very interesting" and 100% state that they strongly recommend the ECRC for other providers.  By the end of June 2017, we expect that we will have served over 1,200 early childhood educators through the Early Childhood Resource Center.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The long term vision is that the Early Childhood Resource Center will offer 40 Professional Development sessions annually with a weekly attendance of 35 early childhood educators.  The success of the ECRC is demonstrated through the extension of the learning into the classroom, where changed practice directly impacts young children.  Central to this changed practice is a commitment to strong literacy learning and curriculum that engages children.  Understanding the social and emotional development of each child is a critical aspect of Professional Development and is reflected in  25% of the workshops.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We use a weekly on-line survey to assess the Early Childhood Resource Center's Professional Development series.  In addition to robust attendance at each session, 100% of participants rate the sessions "very interesting" and offer written testimony to the usefulness of the workshop ideas that demonstrates the importance of extending the learning into the classroom or family childcare home.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Each week's survey provides an opportunity for participants to share their learning and how they incorporated the central idea from the workshop into their teaching.  After a workshop, Girls in Books, that studied the ways females are depicted in children's picture books, one provider reported, "I purchased a book for my class in which the girl was the champion of the story . The workshop made me think more carefully about what message a book sends to my children."  Another said, "I added books with a strong female as the main character to our classroom library. I also gave a copy of the power point from the workshop to our school librarian."
Program Comments
CEO Comments
The Connecticut Children's Museum designs and implements many innovative programs.  Each program is defined by its high-touch approach and attention to detail.  Many programs are grant-based and require both interim and final reporting as well as ongoing data collection, all of which are critical to understanding how the program benefits its recipients.  This work, multiplied by the number of programs we have the opportunity to implement, is very challenging for our organization and its lean staffing.  We have addressed this through structuring the administrator's time, being selective about grant opportunities and being extremely organized.
 
The cost of providing high-quality early care and education is reflective of several organizational priorities.  (1) Serving families of infants and toddlers requires a staff:child ratio that is 2.5 times greater than that for preschool children and more licensing requirements, (2) Retaining well-educated staff requires compensation that recognizes their educational level and longevity in the field and a benefit package befitting their professionalism.  (3)  A commitment to serving all children, regardless of family income, with the staff:child ratios and staff educational levels that guarantee quality care, requires substantial resources to supplement the funding streams available.
 
Our organization addresses these challenges with fundraising efforts and through grants.
 
 
 
CEO/Executive Director
Sandra Malmquist
Term Start Sept 1994
Email creatingkids@snet.net
Experience
The museum’s director, Sandra Malmquist, holds a Masters Degree in anthropology and child development, and has developed and directed children’s programs since 1972.  Ms. Malmquist directs the Museum’s many programs, including the Early Childhood Resource Center.  She is an experienced grants manager.  She has been an early childhood teacher in inclusive settings since 1980 .  She designs the TEXTured Literacy Story Kits for children with visual disabilities and has been trained in the art of audio describe and descriptive reading.  She speaks on literacy, inclusion, the importance of the early childhood environment and multiple intelligences.  Ms. Malmquist is a member of the New Haven Early Childhood Council and its Quality Committee.
 
Ms. Malmquist coaches family childcare providers through the United Way's Success by 6 literacy-based WORDS & NUMBERS project.  She directs the Council's Dual Language Family Literacy Workshop series in partnership with LULAC Head Start.  Ms. Malmquist designed and manages the internationally-themed field trip program at the Connecticut Children's Museum.
 
Working with the CT Commission on Children, Ms. Malmquist wrote the Children's Leadership Training Institute curriculum, a literacy-based, companion program to the Commission's successful Parent Leadership Training Institute.  She trains CLTI teachers to implement this parallel, two generation civic leadership program nationally.
 
 
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 10
Number of Part Time Staff 10
Number of Volunteers 1
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 90%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 5
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 18
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation N/A
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

The Connecticut Children's Museum has many partners.  Here is the list of projects and our collaborators for each one. 

Early Childhood Resource Center -- the New Haven Early Childhood Council.
Family Childcare Tool Kit Box Licensing Project -- All Our Kin.  WORDS & NUMBERS Mentor Project -- United Way of Greater New Haven. 
Dual Language & Literacy Project -- LULAC Head Start.
Around the World educational field trips at the CCM -- Carolyn Foundation.
Mornings at the Museum -- NewAlliance Foundation and the CFGNH.
 

 

 
Board Chair
Katharine Goodbody
Company Affiliation State of CT Office of Public Defender
Term Sept 2012 to Aug 2018
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Shirley Blaier-Stein community volunteer
Ruth Koizim Yale University
Sandra Malmquist Connecticut Children's Museum
Elizabeth McArthur
Phoebe Styron Community Volunteer
Jennifer Tracey-Carlo Tracey Energy Services
Filomena Zarra Creating Kids Childcare Center
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 8
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Sept 01 2016
Fiscal Year End Aug 31 2017
Projected Revenue $858,409.00
Projected Expenses $858,409.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Public Charity document2017View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$904,432$926,324$855,159
Administration Expense------
Fundraising Expense$500$1,000--
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.951.050.94
Program Expense/Total Expenses100%100%100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$1,093,269$1,120,038$1,085,539
Current Assets$104,422$109,773$22,826
Long-Term Liabilities$344,874$363,186$377,890
Current Liabilities$74,752$35,684$35,102
Total Net Assets$673,643$721,168$672,547
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountInstitute of Museum and Library Services $61,000Institute of Museum and Library Services $88,000United Way of Greater New Haven $20,580
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountInternational Association of New Haven $20,000International Association of New Haven $20,000Graustein Memorial Fund $17,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountGraustein Memorial Fund $35,000Graustein Memorial Fund $30,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $3,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.403.080.65
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets32%32%35%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
The Connecticut Children's Museum and all of its myriad programs operate within a very tight budget and are dependent on both "soft" money, i.e., grants and donations and on tuition fees and museum admission fees.  Economic factors greatly influence the amount of discretionary funds families have to spend on out-of-school recreational and educational activities and their ability to afford high-quality childcare.  The more global economic issues have reduced available grant opportunities and grant funds. 
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 22 Wall St
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 562-5437
Contact Email creatingkids@snet.net
CEO/Executive Director Sandra Malmquist
Board Chair Katharine Goodbody
Board Chair Company Affiliation State of CT Office of Public Defender

 

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Provide Quality Education

Educate a child and you change a community. For the child, a good education means better career opportunities and higher lifetime earnings. College graduates enjoy better health and are more inclined to volunteer and vote. For the community, supporting our youths’ educational goals results in a stronger society.