1000 Friends of Connecticut
PO Box 1988
Hartford CT 06144-1988
Contact Information
Address PO Box 1988
Hartford, CT 06144-1988
Telephone (860) 3671687 x
E-mail amerrow@snet.net
Web and Social Media
1000 Friends of CT's Director, Nichole Strack, with Commissioner Redeker from ConnDOT (middle), and 1000 Friends' Treasurer, Kenneth Olson, CEO of POKO Management.
Mission
1000 Friends of Connecticut is a statewide organization whose mission is to promote and shape growth to ensure a prosperous economy, a healthy natural environment, and distinctive, integrated and attractive communities while promoting opportunities in education, housing, transportation, and employment for current and future generations.
 
To accomplish this mission, 1000 Friends of Connecticut works to:
  • Strengthen and direct new development towards communities where infrastructure already exists in order to manage sprawling development and its several costs, including costs to the economy, the private sector, the government, the individual, the environment, and society as a whole;
  • Encourage compact, diverse, and livable communities by offering a wide range of housing choices and encouraging a mixture of land uses, preserving and restoring historic and cultural assets, designing to human scale, and providing comfortable walking, biking, and transit opportunities;
  • Support high quality public transportation and transit-oriented development as preferred alternatives to the single-passenger automobile in order to positively affect business locations decisions, reduce traffic congestion and air pollution, and provide greater access to job opportunities;
  • Promote quality educational and housing opportunities for all our state's residents.
1000 Friends pursues its goals by:
  • Educating and mobilizing the public at the local and state levels, and convening and mediating among diverse stakeholders to build statewide support for Smart Growth principles;
  • Researching fiscal, regulatory, land-use, and transportation and other Smart Growth initiatives;
  • Promoting the adoption of policies, initiatives, and practices by government, business, and other institutions that encourage economic growth while preserving the state's quality of life;
  • Building and sustaining a constituency for Smart Growth and social equity by providing tools and models to measure progress and to advocate for change. 
A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.
!000 Friends manages the Property Tax Working Group, a broad coalition of policy makers, government officials, academics, and non-profit leaders dedicated to educating the public and state leaders about the need for property tax reform and relief, and the deleterious effect of over reliance on the property tax on Connecticut's  economy, environment, and quality of life. 
A Great Opportunity Ending Date Dec 30 2018
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2004
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Nichole C. Strack
Board Chair Susan Merrow
Board Chair Company Affiliation Environmental Lobbyist
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $37,000.00
Projected Expenses $49,000.00
Statements
Mission
1000 Friends of Connecticut is a statewide organization whose mission is to promote and shape growth to ensure a prosperous economy, a healthy natural environment, and distinctive, integrated and attractive communities while promoting opportunities in education, housing, transportation, and employment for current and future generations.
 
To accomplish this mission, 1000 Friends of Connecticut works to:
  • Strengthen and direct new development towards communities where infrastructure already exists in order to manage sprawling development and its several costs, including costs to the economy, the private sector, the government, the individual, the environment, and society as a whole;
  • Encourage compact, diverse, and livable communities by offering a wide range of housing choices and encouraging a mixture of land uses, preserving and restoring historic and cultural assets, designing to human scale, and providing comfortable walking, biking, and transit opportunities;
  • Support high quality public transportation and transit-oriented development as preferred alternatives to the single-passenger automobile in order to positively affect business locations decisions, reduce traffic congestion and air pollution, and provide greater access to job opportunities;
  • Promote quality educational and housing opportunities for all our state's residents.
1000 Friends pursues its goals by:
  • Educating and mobilizing the public at the local and state levels, and convening and mediating among diverse stakeholders to build statewide support for Smart Growth principles;
  • Researching fiscal, regulatory, land-use, and transportation and other Smart Growth initiatives;
  • Promoting the adoption of policies, initiatives, and practices by government, business, and other institutions that encourage economic growth while preserving the state's quality of life;
  • Building and sustaining a constituency for Smart Growth and social equity by providing tools and models to measure progress and to advocate for change. 
Background
1000 Friends of Connecticut was born six years ago out of a deep concern that Connecticut's growth patterns, if left unchallenged, would lead us even further into sprawling landscapes, abandoned cities, clogged highways, and a flagging economy. 1000 Friends resulted from the CenterEdge Process that raised consciousness about these issues throughout the state and at town meetings, attracting 2,500 people. Its founders came from all walks of our community's life: economic development experts, environmentalists, academics, transit activists, municipal leaders, and business-people. The time was ripe for the birth of 1000 Friends, the state's only group solely dedicated to Smart Growth. Each of our constituencies could articulate passionately the frustration of finding themselves working in silos and the helplessness of watching Connecticut change for the worse with each passing year.
 
Since its beginnings, 1000 Friends has consistently articulated the vision and framed the issues of a Connecticut growing smarter. 1000 Friends has worked to promote a fundamental change in the state policies, which cause us to be the state most heavily dependent on property tax. This dependence fuels the land-use decisions that exacerbate sprawl. We have spoken strongly at every available opportunity for regional cooperation, for the coordination of state and local plans of conservation and developments, for better zoning codes, and for the fundamental Smart Growth principles of placing development where infrastructure and transit exist. In its efforts to shape and change public policy, 1000 Friends provides education for policy-makers and the public and mobilizes grassroots support around economic development. For example 1000 Friends has:
  • Lead the challenge at the Capitol to officially recognize Smart Growth principles in law, through PA09-230;
  • Publicly recognized excellence in leadership by developers and individuals through our Development Scorecard Project and Smartie Awards;
  • Brought opinion leaders and the public together in provocative Smart Growth Conferences.
Now we find ourselves at a time in history when policy makers are stepping up as never before to the issue of effectuating whether economic growth comes to our state. At the same time, we face the challenge of sustaining and growing the organization we have built and the progress we have made through a time of severe financial constriction for the public, private, and non-profit sectors.
Impact
1000 Friends of Connecticut remains today the only organization that brings together a broad range of stakeholders and offers them a common language with which to approach changing public policy. We have remained resilient after losing full-time staff in 2009, demonstrating our commitment to and belief in our cause. Despite these obstacles, we have continued to move forward over the past year by:
  • Securing full-time staff through the hire of a young, energetic, and dedicated Director;
  • Hosting "Putting Connecticut Back on its Tracks: A Fall Speaker Series," to raise visibility around our cause and also around the opportunity for sustainable growth that our state currently faces; 
  • Garnering a broad base of supporters in a relatively short time and gaining momentum to broaden this base;
  • Joining a Transit-Oriented Development Coalition to capitalize on Connecticut's unparalleled opportunity to create jobs and development for our 21st century communities, and;
  • Submitting input to the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection's Brownfield Remediation Transformation Program to incentivize sustainable economic growth that will attract business to our state.
Market forces have forced our state to realize it must rethink the way we occupy space and that in order to maximize public and private expenditures, we must embrace principles of sustainable growth. But first, we need to engage the private sector and educate our broad constituency on where the market lies for economic growth. To do this, 1000 Friends will meet the following goals:
  • Increase financial resources and organizational capacity in order to invest time and energies into the areas where our work is most needed-at the front and center of the policy arena;
  • "Put the Growth Back in Smart Growth" by convening an Economic Growth Taskforce and re-convening the Property Tax Working Group;
  • Actively educate the public on our findings at our Fourth Annual Smart Growth Conference on "Healthy Cities."
Needs
For 1000 Friends to accomplish its mission, it educates municipalities and the state on the impediments to market realization, zoning and infrastructure, respectively. We must create the political will necessary for cities and towns to have a proper municipal strategy in place that is sensitive to local needs and to help the state ensure robust capabilities to support the market for smart growth. 
 
The communities in the Greater New Haven region need help to relieve unemployment by increasing the net number of jobs created and providing equal access to the transit necessary to get to those jobs. 1000 Friends of Connecticut's top most pressing needs to help communities include:
  • Sustaining long-term funding in order to plan and deliver our urban growth agenda effectively;
  • Continuing to build our constituency and cultivating more volunteers who hold various stakes under our umbrella cause;
  • Maintaining a strong relationship with and presence in the Greater New Haven region.
  • Providing input on all initiatives under our Urban Growth Agenda that are moving forward right now, including but not limited to: brownfield remediation, transit-oriented development, the updating of the State Plan of Conservation and Development, and reforming property tax.
CEO Statement
Connecticut's growth patterns, if left unchallenged, will lead us even further into sprawling landscapes, abandoned cities, clogged highways, and a flagging economy. The state is one of the least attractive to businesses in the country, and as a result, Connecticut residents cannot find meaningful employment. Furthermore, municipal governments lack the means to generate sustainable revenue due to a debilitating reliance on property taxes, and the state's deficit is no longer sustainable. 
 
Citizens are currently not primed to change their market choices and advocate for policy change. Practitioners need to be primed to implement Smart Growth programs and policies. Smart Growth champions in the Administration and state agencies only recently began a conversation around integrating their efforts to return growth to our state. Consequently, the State Plan of Conservation and Development remains tooth-less while our state still lacks a model to guide Transit-Oriented Development. 
 
Connecticut faces congestion that threatens its economic competitiveness, road and bridge conditions among the worst in the country, limited walking and cycling infrastructure, and mass transit systems that can't keep pace with demand.
 
Municipalities face real pressure to develop land without rhyme or reason in order to compete with bordering towns for revenue from property taxes. Since development in Connecticut has lulled since the economic recession, localities have struggled given the absence of a sustainable form of revenue.
 
Furthermore, Connecticut lacks developers who have the inclination and the policy and programmatic tools to develop compact, mixed-used and mixed-income, transit-oriented communities in urbanized areas.
 
Connecticut needs smart land-use practices that integrate the development and implementation of long-term transportation and energy policies that support community revitalization, prioritize mass transit, emphasize downtowns and main streets through investment in cycling and walking initiatives, and reduces our emphasis on road-building and -widening that places infrastructure costs on the next generation. Implementing 1000 Friends of Connecticut's Smart Growth vision will foster job creation and create communities that attract young workers, and efficiently serve an aging population. Shifting our policy focus in this way will enhance Connecticut's economic competitiveness, protect our environment, and improve the quality of life upon which Connecticut prides itself. 
 
Connecticut needs a bold voice for change. 1000 Friends is that voice. 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Alliances & Advocacy
Secondary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Urban & Community Economic Development
Tertiary Organization Category Environment / Land Resources Conservation
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
Programs
Description
Our program "Puts the Growth Back in Smart Growth" by providing a blueprint for promoting sustainable economic prosperity while also enhancing our state's quality of life through an urban growth agenda that improves the quality of place in Connecticut. We are developing a program that will:
 
  • Convene an Economic Growth Taskforce that outlines how Connecticut is changing, along with the challenges and opportunities we currently face to bring growth back to our state; 
  • Re-convene the Property Tax Working Group to outline opportunities for property tax reform;
  • Release white-papers on these groups' findings and recommendations and educate the public on them in the spring of 2012 at our 4th Annual Smart Growth Conference, and also at Regional Smart Growth Workshops in major cities throughout the state;
  • Run a Brownfield Remediation Incentive Campaign;
  • Support a TOD Coalition, and;
  • Sponsor a series of Friday evening "salons" to encourage lively debate in a relaxed setting and develop a similar plan aimed towards young professionals.
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated / General/Unspecified / Other Economic Level
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

[notes:] Metrics for outputs:

  • number of municipalities engaged
  • number of new potential Board members

  • number of responses to our annual fund appeal and average gift size

  • number of opportunities taken advantage of to shape pubic policy through testimony and public speaking engagements

  • number of attendees at our conference

  • number of likes\friends on Facebook

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
[notes: measures for outcomes]
  • Net number of jobs created;
  • Shift in housing patterns with faster growth in urban living areas and slower growth in suburban areas (think we'd need to reword in the context of Urban Core vs. outer-ring)
  • Number of individuals who are walking, biking, or taking transit and a reduction in the number of single-person automobile trips;
  • Reduction in the amount of preventable pedestrian accidents;
  • Greater number of groundbreakings in urban locations and a slow in the pace of groundbreakings in greenfields;
  • Economic success indicators (such as...?) in urbanized areas will trend upward; conversely, asthma, obesity, diabetes, and heart disease indicators will trend downward. Depression related to social isolation will trend downward;
  • Connecticut will meet its greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets, locally grown food production will increase, and air and water quality indicators will trend upward;
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. A mix of the metrics will be used to evaluate our program.
CEO/Executive Director
Nichole C. Strack
Term Start July 2011
Email nichole@1000friends-ct.org
Experience
EDUCATION
Trinity College, Hartford, CT
Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy and Law, May 2011
  • GPA: 3.7
  • QuestBridge National Scholar, Faculty Honors (Fall‘07-Spring‘09, Spring ‘10-Fall ‘10)
EXPERIENCE
1000 Friends of Connecticut, Executive Director
July 2011-Present
 
The Connecticut League of Conservation Voters (CTLCV), Program Associate
June 2010-July 2011
  • Monitored legislation and investigated the environmental implications of raised bills;
  • Controlled the League’s legislative watchlist and published it on the organization’s website;
  • Assisted the Executive Director in organizing political endorsements and delegated publicity tasks to the fall intern, and;
  • Contributed to the League’s primary publications, the 2010 Connecticut Environmental Briefing Book and the 2010 and 2011 Environmental Legislative Scorecards.
Trinity College, Teaching Assistant for American Public Policy
September 2009-January 2010
  • Planned and consulted with the Chair of the Public Policy Department on course objectives and curriculum, and;
  • Strengthened students’ understanding and written work by conducting frequent teaching assistant sessions.
LEADERSHIP AND ACTIVITIES
  • League of Women Voters, December 2011-Present
  • Bike Walk Connecticut, December 2011-Present
  • Hartford Young Professionals and Entrepreneurs, July 2011-Present
  • Quest Scholars Network, Alumni, April 2007-Present 
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 20
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Heidi Green - Nov 2009
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Comments
CEO Comments
1000 Friends of Connecticut lost its former, very dynamic Executive Director in November of 2009, when the economy was really beginning to feel the constraining grips of the recession. 1000 Friends of Connecticut was not able to secure funding for the next year's operating budget, and our former Director did not renew her contract. The Board of Directors underwent an intensive search for a new Director and filled the full-time position briefly in March 2010. This interim Director resigned from the position after one month, citing personal reasons. The Chair of the Board resumed all organizational management responsibilities, and Board members mostly made individual "behind-the-scene" contributions to the policy arena. The Board hired a Trinity College student as part-time staff to assist the Chair of the Board in these tasks in May 2010, and began investing in her development as a "Smart Growth maverick." A year later, the Board offered Nichole Strack the position of Executive Director, which she enthusiastically accepted.
 
Since that time, I have been working to re-introduce 1000 Friends of Connecticut and have been working closely with the Executive Committee of the Board, who have become my close coaches and mentors. I've become personally invested in my work for several reasons, and find my new role in this state's sustainability movement very rewarding. I'm excited to be in a position where I'm able to directly apply my degree and education to real-life issues; furthermore, I'm particularly enthusiastic to be symbolic of our group's mission in that as a young professional, I'm a metric for sustainability in Connecticut. My new home state faces many challenges, but I bring an enthusiastic attitude to the table and I am committed to making a difference and helping my Board of Directors restore economic vitality to our state's cities and regions in a way that does not push costs to the next generation. 
 
I can help my Board, and effectively help this region, by planning for the long-term and focusing more of my energies on our all-too important program. Our state budget requires it to maximize its investments in the short- and long-term. 1000 Friends of Connecticut faces a similar obstacle, and we need your support to bring growth to our state now, and to create a sustainable development model that will allow our children and grandchildren to inherit a reality much less stark than the current one, which is marked by economic constraint and limited natural resources.
Board Chair
Susan Merrow
Company Affiliation Environmental Lobbyist
Term Dec 2011 to Dec 2014
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Leo Canty
William Cibes Chancellor Emeritus, CT State University System
Jefferson B. Davis Principal, J.B. Davis & Assoc.
Mayor John DeStefano Mayor, City of New Haven
James J. Finley Jr.Executive Director, Connecticut Conference of Municipalities
Norman Garrick UCONN Center for Transportation and Urban Planning
Michelle Gilman
Dara Kovel
Matthew Nemerson President and CEO, Connecticut Technology Council
Kenneth Olson CEO, POKO Management
Robert Orr Principal, Robert Orr, Associates
Howard G. Rifkin Executive Director, Partnership for Strong Communities
Bishop Peter Rosazza Bishop, Catholic Archdiocese of Hartford
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 3
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 84%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 38%
Board Co-Chair
Dara Kovel
Company Affiliation Connecticut Housing Finance Authority
Term Dec 2011 to Dec 2014
Email dara.kovel@chfa.org
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Program / Program Planning
Executive
CEO Comments
The Board of Directors describes their major responsibilities as staff oversight, board recruitment, fundraising, creating and overseeing committees with tasks that are vital to the organization, including a Program Committee, providing policy and strategic direction, representing the views of the public and private sectors, and event planning and support.
 
The biggest challenge 1000 Friends of Connecticut faces in terms of governance is a need for new blood on the Board, specifically with business and corporate backgrounds. 
 
We currently have a Conflict of Interest Policy, a Board of Director Letter of Commitment, a List of Key Attributes of a Director, and a Board Development Matrix, and the Board is revisiting the documents' criteria and language at our upcoming Board Retreat, scheduled for January, 2012. Other goals of this process include:
  • Revising the bylaws to consider limiting a board member to a maximum of two consecutive full terms and increasing the quorum so that it requires at least a majority to 2/3 of the Board's approval on any vote (as opposed to a majority of the Board in attendance for a vote);
  • Enforcing the power of removal of Board members who are not actively participating or who do not attend meetings, allowing and encouraging recruitment of new Directors; 
  • Creating a comprehensive handbook for Directors that includes information on: the Board of Directors, Historical Background, Long-range planning, Minutes from recent Board meetings, Finance and fundraising, and Staff;
  • Revising and updating the Conflict of Interest Policy, and;
  • Developing a document retention and whistle blower policy.
 We also are actively recruiting Directors to represent more diverse views and stakes within our cause.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2011
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2011
Projected Revenue $37,000.00
Projected Expenses $49,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902010
Form 9902009
Form 9902008
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201020092008
Program Expense$46,867$35,371$93,090
Administration Expense$17,269$74,647$114,506
Fundraising Expense$150$106$85
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.040.890.81
Program Expense/Total Expenses73%32%45%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201020092008
Total Assets$15,865$14,663$29,202
Current Assets$14,719$12,971$27,030
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$1,898$3,000$5,438
Total Net Assets$13,967$11,663$23,764
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201020092008
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $25,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $25,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $37,500
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Funders' Network for Smart Growth $25,000Jesse Cox Chartiable Lead Trust $35,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Fairfield County Community Foundation $10,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201020092008
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities7.764.324.97
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201020092008
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Comments
CEO Comments
Historically, funding has always been a factor. We grew rapidly after our founding, but didn't have time to develop our funding base enough before the recession hit. The foundation funding on which we had relied became scarce. The difference between 1000 Friends of Connecticut and organizations that did not survive had a lot to do with our committed Board of Directors, which worked hard to keep us going. Furthermore, grassroots fundraising and small donations are not as strong as they could be. When we last had an active presence, reliance fell to the Executive Director to fundraise. As a result, 1000 Friends became dependent on one multi-year grant and when that expired, we lost full-time staff and became (and remain) focused on survival instead of our program. 
 
1000 Friends employs a bookkeeper who comes in every month and provides the Board with a profit and loss expenditures report and projected-to-actual reports. In addition, the bookkeeper cuts the checks that the Treasurer or President sign. 1000 Friends uses PayChecks for payroll and financial records are computerized, using QuickBooks Pro.
 
An accountant completes the Form 990, as well as the governance questions in Part VI. The same company that the accountant represents performs a compilation (not an audit).
 
The Executive Director works with the Officers of the Incorporation to draft the budget and then presents it to the Board for approval. 
 
To address our funding challenges, we are developing a funding/development plan that includes, but is not limited to:
  • Identifying new resources of revenue and maximizing existing resources; for example, fundraising events, expanding corporate and individual donor support;
  • Including strategies that address future funding endeavors; for example, staffing, expanding, or creating new initiatives, and;
  • On an annual basis, inviting the accountant who prepares the compilation to attend a Board meeting to review the compilation, answer questions and provide guidance.
 
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address PO Box 1988
Hartford, CT 061441988
Primary Phone 860 3671687
Contact Email amerrow@snet.net
CEO/Executive Director Nichole C. Strack
Board Chair Susan Merrow
Board Chair Company Affiliation Environmental Lobbyist

 

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