Boy Scouts of America, CT Yankee Council
60 Wellington Road
Milford CT 06461
Contact Information
Address 60 Wellington Road
Milford, CT 06461-
Telephone (203) 876-6868 x
Fax 203-876-6884
E-mail info@ctyankee.org
Web and Social Media

Mission
The Connecticut Yankee Council carries out the mission of the Boy Scouts of America in every community in our Council by providing leadership opportunities for all youth through quality programs, mentoring from trained adult volunteers and ongoing learning  and personal development through outdoor experiences.
 
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to serve others by helping to instill values in young people and in other ways prepare them to make ethical choices over their lifetime in achieving their full potential. The values we strive to instill are based on those found in the Scout Oath and Law.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1910
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Charles L Flowers
Board Chair Christopher McLeod
Board Chair Company Affiliation Self-employed
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $3,933,173.00
Projected Expenses $3,783,542.00
Statements
Mission
The Connecticut Yankee Council carries out the mission of the Boy Scouts of America in every community in our Council by providing leadership opportunities for all youth through quality programs, mentoring from trained adult volunteers and ongoing learning  and personal development through outdoor experiences.
 
The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to serve others by helping to instill values in young people and in other ways prepare them to make ethical choices over their lifetime in achieving their full potential. The values we strive to instill are based on those found in the Scout Oath and Law.
Background

We collaborated with over 210 community-based organizations to charter 329 Scouting units in 37 communities and serve 10,709 youth with high quality programs. Adult volunteers collectively spent over 210,000 hours leading, mentoring, training and guiding our Scouts.

Cub Scouts

The best way to find out what you do best is to try it. Swing a bat. Pitch a tent. Build a Pinewood Derby Car. Cub Scouts are at that magical age where everything is new and possible and most importantly, fun. They live in a world of “firsts” — first home run, first campfire, first checkered flag — where their game plan is their imagination. Their most valuable reward, the friends they make for life and a parent’s proud smile. These are invaluable experiences that can be had in Scouting. These are life lessons that transform today’s Cub Scouts into tomorrow’s Boy Scouts. 5,323 boys participated with their parents in Cub Scout Packs last year.

Boy Scouts

Most boys avoid obstacles. Boy Scouts seek them. They live for any opportunity to display their abilities while learning new skills. Camping is fun; but surviving a downpour in the middle of the night, that’s an adventure! Cooking over a campfire is fun; learning which wild berries are edible is survival. Spending a weekend in the woods is fun; breaking camp without leaving a trace is admirable. These are invaluable experiences that can be had in Scouting. These are life lessons that transform today’s Boy Scouts into tomorrow’s leaders. 4,121 Boy Scouts participated in Troops and Teams last year.

Venturing

What did you do this weekend? For Venturers, it may be rappelling a cliff, shooting the rapids, leading their peers, or serving others. Working as a team, Venturing Crews and Sea Scout Ships welcome the opportunity to pass these trials. Venturing provides exciting activities that help co-ed teens pursue their special interests and hobbies while growing and developing leadership skills. 1,476 youth participated in Crews and Sea Scout Ships last year.

Exploring

Exploring is a unique career exploration program for teenage young men and women providing an introduction to a variety of careers and opportunities to learn life skills, behaviors and values necessary to choose a career, prepare for it, and excel once on the job. 530 young adults participated in Explorer programs last year.

Volunteers

Volunteers join Scouting to make a positive difference in the lives of young people. Through the dedication of these many volunteers, we remain the foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training in America. Nearly 4,459 trained adults gave leadership and mentoring to all our programs.

 

Impact

Scouting is changing the lives of young people in throughout New Haven and Fairfield county through our transformational program that positively impact society as a whole. Deep within the ethos that Scouting instills is a need to wake up in the morning seeking your share of the work to be done.


Through partnerships with over 300 community-based organizations including churches, PTO's, veteran's organizations and civic clubs; and with the support and guidance of over 4,200 trained volunteer adult leaders, Scouting prepares young people for life. For more than 100 years we have sought to instill timeless values of character, servant leadership and selfless service in young people. While our values have remained consistent, the methods have changed to meet the times, and today, Scouting has adapted many of its programs to focus on STEM-based initiatives, giving young people job skills they will need, and that they may not be receiving in public education. Programs like the Pinewood Derby and building a rope bridge are more than just fun activities. They force the Scouts to learn basic or advanced engineering skills, help them develop good preparation and planning, and give them valuable time with positive adult mentors.

As boys advance through Scouting, they are given more and more independent leadership opportunities as the adults transition into a coaching role. Scouting teaches boys modern leadership theory and gives them a place to practice and a safe place to make mistakes.

We know from studies that Scouting has done nationally and locally the positive, life-long difference that just one year in our program can make on the life of a young man or woman. A recent study of Eagle Scouts conducted by Baylor University found that Eagle Scouts are more likely to engage in behaviors that are designed to enhance and protect the environment; that Eagle Scouts are more likely to be committed to setting and achieving personal, professional, financial and spiritual goals; that Eagle Scouts show higher levels of planning and preparedness than do other Scouts and non-Scouts; and that Eagle Scouts exhibit an increased tendency to participate in a variety of health and recreational activities.

 
Deep within the ethos that Scouting instills is a need to wake up in the morning seeking your share of the work to be done. 

As boys advance through Scouting, they are given more and more independent leadership opportunities as the adults transition into a coaching role. Scouting teaches boys modern leadership theory and gives them a place to practice and a safe place to make mistakes. 

We know from studies that Scouting has done nationally and locally the positive, life-long difference that just one year in our program can make on the life of a young man or woman. A recent study of Eagle Scouts conducted by Baylor University found that Eagle Scouts are more likely to engage in behaviors that are designed to enhance and protect the environment; that Eagle Scouts are more likely to be committed to setting and achieving personal, professional, financial and spiritual goals; that Eagle Scouts show higher levels of planning and preparedness than do other Scouts and non-Scouts; and that Eagle Scouts exhibit an increased tendency to participate in a variety of health and recreational activities.
Needs
As we strive to become the agency of choice for families in New Haven and Fairfield counties, we need to recruit Board members reflective of the diversity of our communities, and specifically board leadership from New Haven county.
 
We are also seeking to partner with community organizations who share Scouting's mission of providing young people with high quality, life-changing programs. Visit www.ctyankee.org for a list of needs for our camps or to contact the council about volunteering for any of our programs.
Board Chair Statement
It’s a great day for Scouting!

Thank you for your support of Scouting in the Connecticut Yankee Council. It takes time, talent and treasures from thousands of volunteers and supporters like you to deliver high-quality Scouting programs to nearly 11,000 young people each year and grow in our membership, service and program opportunities.

Your support brought together the largest gathering of Scouts in Connecticut at ConnJam 2015, a weekend full of activities and programs that excited young people of all ages, along with nearly 100 other district activities, trainings and opportunities. Our summer camp programs continue to light the spirit within the heart of a Scout and they’re made possible thanks to you.
Your support helped us continue our outreach into our most underserved communities through the establishment of a STEM Day Camp in South Norwalk, a Hispanic-oriented Cub Scout Pack in Stamford and additional units in New Haven. We also proudly welcomed
the first Eagle Scout from the City of New Haven in over a dozen years!
 
Your support helped us ensure that every boy who joined Scouting has a safe, high-quality program that delivers the promise of our mission.
 
On behalf of our Executive Board and the entire Scouting family, we thank you for your support of Scouting. Your involvement prepares young people for ife and in turn provides our communities with future leaders founded on timeless values and principles. You are critical to our
success.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Youth Development / Boy Scouts Of America
Secondary Organization Category Education /
Areas Served
Branford
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
The Connecticut Yankee Council serves 37 communities in Fairfield, New Haven and the town of Southington in Hartford county. 
Programs
Description

A family and home-centered program that develops ethical decision-making for boys in the second through fifth grades (or who are 8, 9, and 10 years old). Fourth and fifth-grade (or 10-year-old) boys are called Webelos Scouts (WE ll BE LOyal Scouts) and participate in more advanced activities that begin to prepare them to become Boy Scouts. Cub Scoutings emphasis is on quality program at the local level, where boys and families are involved.

Population Served At-Risk Populations / K-12 (5-19 years) / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Cub Scouting program gives youth members an introduction to what they can look forward to in the Boy Scout program.  All of the activities and events are age appropriate and focused on building life skills and teaching values.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. To continue to prepare young people to make ethical choices over their lifetime by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored by advancement reporting.  If boys are advancing through the program to the next level and achieving requirements of activities, then we know it is successful. Retention is also a strong indicator of success of the program.  If boys are staying in the program, then we know it is successful.  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Our Council Cub Scout advancement rate is 80% as comapred to the regional rate of 62.4% and the national average of  57.2%.  Retention rate is 73.8% which is above the regional average of 71.4% and above the national average of 66.5% and has been consistently above the regional average as much as 6% since 2007. 
Description

A program for boys 11 through 17 designed to achieve the aims of Scouting through a vigorous outdoor program and peer group leadership with the counsel of an adult Scoutmaster. (Boys also may become Boy Scouts if they have earned the Arrow of Light Award or have completed the fifth grade.)

Population Served Males / At-Risk Populations / K-12 (5-19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Since 2007, on average our members give back to the community more than 40,000 service hours per year or 2.8 hours per member per year. These are just the service hours that are reported, many units do not report the service projects that they do.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The values and skills young people learn in Scouting build a solid foundation for their life.  Men who were Scouts as boys are more likely than men with no Scouting experience to: Graduate from College (35% vs 19%), Earn higher annual household incomes ($80k vs $61k), value family relationships highly (81% vs 74%), and have lifelong friendships (89% vs 74%).  In addition, more than 8 out of 10 men who were Scouts say that there have been real-life situations where having been a Scout helped them be a better leader and react to crisis situations. since 2007, on average our members give back to the community more than 40,000 service hours per year or 2.8 hours per member per year.  these are just the service hours that are reported, many units do not report the service projects that they do.
 
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored by advancement reporting.  If boys are advancing through the program, then we know it is successful.  Retention is also a leading indicator of the success of the program.  If boys are staying in the program, then we know it is successful.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Boy Scout advancement reporting shows that at 45.7% we are above the regional average of 42.3% and the national average of 39.8%.  This percentage has been steadily increasing since 2010 when advancement reporting became mandatory.  Our retention rate (71%) for Boy Scouts is slightly below the national average 79.7% this year due to a reconstruction of our program in urban areas.  Since 2007 retention has been consistently above the regional and national average by as much as 5%.  However, our biggest success is the number of boys who reach the pinnacle of Scouting, the Eagle Rank.  On average we have 225 - 275 Scout earn the Eagle rank each year.  
Description

A program for young men and women who are 14 (and have completed the eighth grade) through 20 years of age to provide positive experiences through exciting and meaningful activities that help youth pursue their special interests, grow, develop leadership skills, and become good citizens.

Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Life is a series of tests. Each one can be a setback or a chance to shine.  Working as a team, the young adults in every Venturing Crew welcome the opportunity to pass these trials.  A series of successes that build one upon another.  Every person playing their role, no one more important than another. These are invaluable experiences that can be had in Scouting.  These are the life lessons that transform them into tomorrow's responsible adults.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.  For more than 100 years, Scouting programs have instilled in youth the values found in the Scout Oath and Law.  Today these values are just as relevant in helping youth to grow to their full potential as they were in 1910.  Scouting helps youth develop academic skills, self-confidence, ethics, leadership skills, and citizenship skills that influence their adult lives.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. As with Cub Scouting and Boy Scouting, Venturing success is monitored by retention.  Additionally, an leading indicator of success is the number of youth served or market share. Venturing is a relatively new program to the Boy Scouts and is growing expotentially - more boys and girls are staying in the Scouting program because of its changing 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Retention rate for Venturing in the Connecticut Yankee Council is 67.8% as compared with the Regional rate of 57.6% and the National rate of 63.3%. Our considerably higher retention rate shows that we are running a successful program for youth ages 13-20.  Additionally, our market share served is 3.6% as compared with the regional market share of 1.4% and the national market share of 1.8%.
CEO/Executive Director
Charles L Flowers
Term Start Jan 2013
Email charles.flowers@scouting.org
Experience Charles comes from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania with a proven track record of 19 years as a Professional Scouter, most recently serving as a Director of Field Service  for the Laurel Highlands Council. Charles has previously served as a District Executive in Richmond, Virginia, and Field Director in Columbus, Ohio. He also served as an Associate Director with the National Boy Scouts of America Center for Professional Development. 
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 19
Number of Part Time Staff 123
Number of Volunteers 4531
Staff Retention Rate 95%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 12
Asian American/Pacific Islander 4
Caucasian 114
Hispanic/Latino 12
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 94
Female 48
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Douglas Krofina Feb 1992 -
Louis D Salute Sept 2003 -
Senior Staff
Title Director of Development and Marketing
Title Director of Camping
Title Field Director
Title Field Director
Title Controller (volunteer)
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Quarterly
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Quarterly
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Quarterly
Collaborations
The Connecticut Yankee Council proudly collaborates with 240 individual chartering organizations each year to deliver our program. They include churches, schools, civic organizations, fraternal societies, veterans groups and others with a similar mission of providing outstanding programs to young people. 
Board Chair
Christopher McLeod
Company Affiliation Self-employed
Term Jan 2015 to Jan 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Michael Abrahamson
James Accomando Accomando Consulting
David Adler Sikorsky Aerospace Services, President
John Andres, Esq. John C. Andres, Esq.
Peter Anstett Retired
Jason Bartlett City of New Haven
Blaine Boxwell, Jr. Sikorsky Aircraft
Maurice Cabral Lake Partners Inc., CFO
Michael J. Cacace Esq.Cacace, Tusch & Santagata
William C. Calderara Newtown Savings Bank, Senior Vice President
William B. Chin Town of Trumbull
Steven Elzholz Community Volunteer
John Farley Hamden Board of Education HS Teacher
William Ference Community Volunteer
Donna Funk
Michael Gagne IRS
John Gelinas
Cathy Graves
William R Hall Jr.Kaiser-Battistone Plumber Rooter
David Hungerford Community Volunteer
Jennifer Jackson Community Volunteer
Bryan LeClerc Berchem, Moses & Devlin
Jay F. Lubin NYLEX Benefits, Executive Vice President
Christopher Luise
Chris Lyddy Fairfield Police Dept., Deputy Chief
David Mestre Discovery Museum, Manager fo Space Science Education
Ray Moncevicius Fischer Technology Inc.
Wiley Mullins Uncle Wiley's Specialty Foods, Inc., President
Richard Phillips Self-Employed
Peter Riordan
Tom Rusin community Volunteer
Robert T. Sadock MDCommunity Volunteer
Mark Semmelrock
David Sippin Sippin Co.
George Sorenson FE Clean Energy Group, Chairman
Scott Stallings Alexion
Eric Twombly
Jason VanLeeuwen
Stephen Ward Community Volunteer
James Zanvettor UIL Holdings
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 38
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 37
Female 3
Unspecified 1
Youth Board Members
Additional Boards: Youth Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Standing Committees
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Finance
Marketing
Membership
Nominating
Administration
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Endowment
Investment
Operations
Program / Program Planning
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
CEO Comments
    
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2016
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2016
Projected Revenue $3,933,173.00
Projected Expenses $3,783,542.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 5%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902014
Form 9902013
Form 9902012
Form 9902011
Form 9902010
Form 9902009
Form 9902008
Audit Documents
Audit2014
Audit2013
Audit Report2012
Audit Report2011
Audit Report2010
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Letter of Determination
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Annual Report2015View
Annual Report2013View
Annual Report2011View
Annual Report2010View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$797,582$729,149$684,720
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$24,292$39,292$35,648
------
$1,845,379$2,420,557$1,903,030
Investment Income, Net of Losses$489,036$943,806$165,863
Membership Dues------
Special Events$278,356$327,421$434,452
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$75,342$506,494$472,246
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$3,509,145$4,151,598$3,857,667
Administration Expense$191,972$153,105$146,714
Fundraising Expense$285,629$293,343$357,803
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.881.080.85
Program Expense/Total Expenses88%90%88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue26%27%31%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$11,086,517$11,544,841$11,453,697
Current Assets$786,590$1,059,728$1,055,239
Long-Term Liabilities$2,850,655$2,892,840$2,822,547
Current Liabilities$415,423$461,413$429,139
Total Net Assets$7,820,439$8,191,188$8,202,011
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $173,941The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $168,073The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $69,923
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Peter & Carmen Lucia Buck Foundation $40,000The Peter and Carmen Lucia Buck Foundation $40,000The Peter and Carmen Lucia Buck Foundation $50,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.892.302.46
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets26%25%25%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 60 Wellington Road
Milford, CT 06461
Primary Phone 203 876-6868
Contact Email info@ctyankee.org
CEO/Executive Director Charles L Flowers
Board Chair Christopher McLeod
Board Chair Company Affiliation Self-employed

 

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