Center for Children's Advocacy
65 Elizabeth Street
Hartford CT 06105
Contact Information
Address 65 Elizabeth Street
Hartford, CT 06105-
Telephone (860) 570-5327 x
Fax 860-570-5256
E-mail mstone@cca-ct.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The Center for Children’s Advocacy provides legal representation and advocacy for the poorest, most at-risk children and teens in Connecticut. Our work is difficult and it is critical: abuse and neglect, racial justice, educational inequities, youth homelessness, access to medical and mental health care. We have offices in Connecticut's largest and poorest cities, and our mobile office goes directly to youth in communities that need us the most. 

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1997
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Martha Stone, JD
Board Chair David Cooney JD
Board Chair Company Affiliation RisCassi & Davis
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

The Center for Children’s Advocacy provides legal representation and advocacy for the poorest, most at-risk children and teens in Connecticut. Our work is difficult and it is critical: abuse and neglect, racial justice, educational inequities, youth homelessness, access to medical and mental health care. We have offices in Connecticut's largest and poorest cities, and our mobile office goes directly to youth in communities that need us the most. 

Background The Center for Children’s Advocacy was incorporated on June 20, 1997 by Attorneys Martha Stone, Kathryn Emmett and John Brittain.  Attorney Stone, the Center’s Executive Director, started the Center in a small donated room at the University of Connecticut School of Law with a budget of $2,000, and has guided the Center to its status as a widely respected legal services organization with eleven attorneys.

CCA’s attorneys have offices inside hospitals, health centers and schools in Bridgeport, Hartford, New Britain and New Haven - locations where they are easily accessible to poor children. CCA attorneys conduct outreach throughout the state to children and youth at Department of Children and Families (DCF) placements, juvenile justice facilities, schools and community programs. Each year, CCA provides legal consultation or representation to more than 900 individual children while engaging in training and systemic advocacy that benefits thousands of poor children throughout Connecticut.

Impact
Recent Accomplishments
1. The Center provided consultation/representation to more than 900 individual Connecticut children, helping them access services and reducing problems that interfered with healthy development and educational achievement.
 
2. The Center won a ruling from the State Department of Education that found that Bridgeport Public Schools failed to identify and appropriately serve children eligible for special education services; the State ordered Bridgeport to take massive corrective action.
 
3. The Center addressed the lack of services and supports for students who are expelled from school, successfully advocating for systemic reforms to ensure that schools provide expelled students with an alternative educational opportunity that addresses the students’ needs. This mandate was included in a law passed in 2016, Public Act No. 16-147, An Act Concerning the Recommendations of the Juvenile Justice Policy and Oversight Committee.
 
4. The Center's multi-year effort to reform alternative schools resulted in new law and regulations to dramatically improve education for the more than 4,000 students in Connecticut who are placed in alternative schools. 
 

Goals:

1. Respond to the urgent need for legal representation for immigrant children by developing, training and providing technical assistance to a statewide pro bono attorney corps.
 
2. Build capacity to measure, record and report outcomes for individual legal services cases
 
3. Engage in administrative advocacy and litigation to generate system reforms that reduce racial and ethnic disparities in the education and juvenile justice systems
 
4. Provide workshops and training to help at-risk youth understand their legal rights and learn to be good advocates for themselves.
Needs

$1,400 for stipends for youth who participate in the Center’s youth-led systems change groups, where youth learn about the law and work to identify and address a systemic problem that impacts youth in their community.

$5,000 to support Police-Youth training in New Haven to increase officers’ knowledge about adolescent development and traumatic stress and help officers learn how to de-escalate interactions with adolescents.

$15,000 for a part-time outreach worker to work with a CCA attorney to reduce homelessness among youth who grow up in DCF care and age out of care at age 18 without any family supports and a limited ability to support themselves.

$25,000 for a bilingual assistant to increase the Center’s capacity to represent undocumented immigrant children.

Volunteers to serve on the Center's Board of Directors and event planning committees.

CEO Statement

The Center for Children’s Advocacy gives poor children a voice. We serve the most vulnerable, at-risk children in Connecticut. Our clients include young victims of abuse, students failed by the education system and pushed out of school, homeless youth, children with chronic health conditions exacerbated by poverty, and children with disabilities facing discrimination. The Center is the only legal organization in Connecticut that does individual representation and systemic and legislative advocacy to serve all children from the poorest communities.

We are careful to limit our reliance on government funding, to ensure that we are always able to advocate zealously for our clients and challenge government agencies without being constrained by concerns about revenue. In this challenging economic and political climate, as state and federal governments propose withdrawing funds from systems that protect and meet the needs of poor children, it is more important than ever that marginalized children have skilled, passionate lawyers to defend their legal rights. They need a watchdog to enforce legal entitlements. More than anyone else, the Center fills that role.


Board Chair Statement

The Center for Children’s Advocacy is a small organization with big outcomes. From representation of one child to massive systemic advocacy that improves services for thousands of children, the Center has an outsize impact on Connecticut’s most at-risk children. Over the past few years, the Center’s advocacy has reformed alternative schools across the state, advanced educational equity in Hartford, secured passage of a law that prohibited most suspensions and expulsions of very young children, forced large school systems to overhaul their special education services, and dramatically reduced school-based arrests. Attorneys have helped abandoned, immigrant children who are undocumented gain legal status that saves them from being returned to life-threatening conditions.

The Center’s biggest challenge is securing funding to sustain the core programs while also meeting the growing need. To avoid the potential of having its advocacy compromised by dependence on state funding, the Center relies on financial support from individuals and private foundations, and on income earned with its training programs and publications. Annual budget development is always an anxious time. Fortunately, we have found that donors upset by recent expressions of hostility toward the populations we serve, the threatened withdrawal of the safety net, and disregard of children’s civil rights, have turned to the Center with donations to help. We are heartened by that support and encourage more donors to join with us to protect vulnerable children.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy / Civil Rights, Social Action, & Advocacy N.E.C.
Areas Served
Other
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Hartford, New Haven, Bridgeport, Stamford, Middletown, New Britain, Norwalk and Waterbury
Programs
Description

CCA’s Child Abuse Project provides legal representation to children who have been abused or neglected. Project attorneys take time to build a relationship and understand the needs of each child client; they closely monitor children’s cases to ensure that necessary services are provided. Child clients, who range in age from infants to older teens, need legal assistance with access to health and mental health services, educational supports, and disability-related services. Unlike attorneys who volunteer to represent children in child abuse cases, CCA provides legal representation on every legal issue (excluding criminal cases), representing one child in many different legal matters, if necessary.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
85% of children will access appropriate levels of health and mental health care.
85% of children will access appropriate educational services.
90% of children will experience a reduction in an identified social or environmental factor that is impeding their health or education.
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Youth graduate from high school.
Youth are living in stable housing.
Youth have a stable source of income.
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
A review of electronic case closing forms maintained by project attorneys.
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Michael, an adolescent who had been neglected as a young child and grown up in DCF care, had disabilities that made achieving in school and supporting himself a challenge. Despite these challenges, Michael was scheduled to graduate from high school, but rather than looking forward to life after high school, Michael was terrified at the prospect that his graduation would mean he must leave the care of DCF.  Given Michael’s challenges, he would have an extremely difficult time finding a job, continuing in post secondary education and paying for and managing his own housing. His CCA attorney successfully advocated for ongoing transition support services, including job placement in an experiential learning setting and development of a vocational plan. The attorney also successfully advocated with DCF for a referral to an independent living community-based supportive apartment program, ongoing DCF support services, and a plumbing apprenticeship.

Description

The TLAP provides legal representation to poor adolescents to improve their educational opportunity and attainment and future successful independence. Complex issues with a legal component often hinder teenagers from taking advantage of the educational opportunities available. Legal intervention can have an enormous, positive impact on educational outcomes. 

The TLAP's new mobile legal services van enables the TLAP attorney to travel into the community and provide legal services to youth inside its mobile legal office.  The Project also accepts referrals from Hartford and Fairfield County community agencies, operates a legal clinic on-site at Harding High School in Bridgeport, and provides legal services to youth at shelters, group homes, residential treatment centers and other community sites.
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / At-Risk Populations / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

85% of youth will access appropriate levels of health and mental health care.

85% of youth will access appropriate educational services.

90% of youth will experience a reduction in an identified social or environmental factor that is impeding their health or education.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Youth graduate from high school.

Youth are living in stable housing.

Youth have a stable source of income.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

A review of electronic case closing forms maintained by project attorneys.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Baya, born in another country, lost her mother and grandmother when she was young. Her father, whom she had never met, arranged to bring her at age 9 to his home in the U.S., where he began physically abusing her. Other members of the community intervened and assumed Baya's care, and Baya's father abandoned her. Baya became an exceptional student and received a full scholarship to college.  However, she had no money for clothes, had no housing during school vacations, and was subject to constant risk of deportation to a country where she knew no one. 

CCA’s advocacy for Baya over the past 3½ years helped her receive services from DCF so she does not become homeless during school vacations and helped her become a Lawful Permanent Resident of the U.S.  Baya wrote to CCA: “You and your entire office have been my rock since my freshman year and I am so excited to be able to finally breathe a sigh of relief …I can finally begin this new chapter of my life now.”

Description The Medical Legal Partnership Project (MLPP) improves child health by teaming CCA attorneys with doctors to increase poor children’s access to appropriate health care and reduce non-medical factors that contribute to poor health outcomes.

MLPP attorneys are located at Yale New Haven Hospital, five health care sites in Hartford and one site in New Britain. MLPP attorneys, doctors and other health care practitioners identify young patients whose health is impacted by non-medical issues, and provide legal consultation and legal representation as necessary to address those issues. The MLPP represents clients in matters relating to:

  • Economic assistance benefits;
  • Medicaid advocacy;
  • Access to appropriate services for children with disabilities;
  • Housing conditions; and
  • Educational rights of disabled children.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / People/Families of People with Health Conditions
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

85% of children and youth will access appropriate levels of health and mental health care.

85% of children and youth will access appropriate educational services.

90% of children and youth will experience a reduction in an identified social or environmental factor that is impeding their health or education.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Children and youth are living in the least restrictive environment that meets their needs.

Children and youth with chronic illnesses and disabilities have good physical health for a child with the condition.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

A review of electronic case closing forms maintained by project attorneys.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

When Carlos developed aggressive cancer and began treatment with ongoing chemotherapy and daily radiation, his mother, a single parent who worked for a home health care agency, could no longer work.  She received unemployment for a short time, but when the benefits ended she had no income and no one to help care for Carlos so she could go back to work. The Oncology Department social worker advised Carlos’ mother to apply to the Social Security Administration for disability benefits for Carlos.  The Social Security Administration denied the family’s application based on incorrect information, but would not respond to phone calls from Carlos’ mother or the social worker. An MLPP attorney represented Carlos’ family in an appeal of the denial and succeeded in getting the Social Security Administration to grant the family’s application. Carlos’ mother now has a small amount of income to meet Carlos’ basic needs and ensure the family does not become homeless.

Description

TeamChild is an innovative legal advocacy project that addresses the underlying causes of a child’s delinquency. The CCA attorney provides legal representation to court-involved youth in Hartford, helping to access critical and legally mandated educational, mental health and other social services to minimize involvement with the juvenile justice system. 

The Project also works to with low performing schools in Hartford to reduce truancy and help middle school students at high risk of dropping out of school. Truancy Court is presided over by volunteer judges; project staff implement individual plans for each student to remove barriers to school attendance and promote school participation. CCA attorneys provide legal advocacy in areas of special education, benefits, guardianship and access to mental health care; community partners provide case management.
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) / At-Risk Populations / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

85% of youth will access appropriate levels of mental health care.

85% of youth will access appropriate educational services.

90% of youth will experience a reduction in an identified social or environmental factor that is impeding their mental health or education.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Youth graduate from high school.

Youth are not involved with the juvenile or criminal justice systems.

 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

A review of electronic case closing forms maintained by project attorneys.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Keith, a 7th grade student, was often lost in class and usually lagging behind the other students. Although there were clear indications that Keith had a learning disability, the school never had him evaluated. He was disengaged from school and frequently absent. When Keith returned to school, a counselor, alarmed by the number of absences Keith was accumulating, suggested that Keith’s family talk with the CCA attorney who represented youth at Keith’s K-8 school.  As CCA worked with Keith’s family to help Keith access appropriate educational services, Keith’s mother said, “this is the first time that I feel like the school is really listening to me.” Keith accessed appropriate educational services that enabled his self confidence to soar and helped him take ownership of his school experience. By the end of the school year, Keith was doing much better in all of his classes and won “Most Improved Student” at the 8th grade graduation ceremony. 

Description

The Racial Justice Project protects the civil rights of youth of color who are subjected to policies and practices that lead to racial inequities in education, school discipline, treatment by the juvenile justice system and access to behavioral health services. CCA provides legal services to youth of color who are subjected to harsh school discipline, illegal school push-out and unconstitutional targeting by law enforcement. The Project also represents Hartford children in the Sheff v. O’Neill educational equity lawsuit; provides police-youth training sessions to increase officers' understanding of adolescent behavior and how to deescalate police-youth interactions; and co-chairs Racial and Ethnic Disparities (RED) Committees in Bridgeport, Hartford, New Haven and Waterbury, where stakeholders identify and reform policies and practices that result in youth of color being treated more harshly by the juvenile justice system.

Population Served Blacks, African Heritage / Hispanic, Latino Heritage / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Population-level data will show decreases in racial and ethnic disparities at various points in the education and juvenile justice systems.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Reviews of local data, from the State Department of Education, Court Support Services Division and Department of Children and Families, on school discipline, educational achievement, arrests, detention admission, placement into juvenile justice residential facilities and parole revocations.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Reductions in school-based arrests, of 25% - 50%, in four Connecticut cities.

A 34% reduction in juvenile court referrals of youth of color for misdemeanor offenses like disorderly conduct.

A decrease in detention admissions for violation of court orders – from over 20% of admissions to less than 5% of admissions.

The elimination of racial and ethnic disparities in the amount of time youth wait in detention for placement in residential treatment.

CEO/Executive Director
Martha Stone, JD
Term Start June 1997
Email mstone@cca-ct.org
Experience Martha Stone is founder and Executive Director of the Center for Children’s Advocacy. Prior to founding CCA in 1997, Martha served as Associate Director of Children’s Rights, Inc., a national organization engaged in foster care litigation throughout the United States; and for 18 years previous to that, she was Legal Director of the Connecticut Civil Liberties Union. Martha is responsible for bringing class action lawsuits resulting in Consent Decrees involving DCF (Juan F.), CT juvenile detention centers, and access to community-based mental health services for the juvenile justice population (Emily J.). She is co-counsel for the plaintiffs in Sheff v. O’Neill, the Hartford school desegregation case. She is an Adjunct Professor at the UConn School of Law, where she teaches a course in child advocacy. Martha is the recipient of many awards for distinguished service including the Ct. Bar Association Charles Parker Legal Services Award, Ct. Youth Services Association Advocacy Committee Award, the Bank of America Local Hero Award, The Wheeler Clinic Advocacy Award, and the Champion of Children Award from the Village for Families and Children. She received a JD and LLM from Georgetown University Law Center.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 15
Number of Part Time Staff 7
Number of Volunteers 76
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 92%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 17
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

Yale New Haven Hospital, CT Children’s Medical Center and Saint Francis Hospital provide office space inside the hospital for a CCA attorney, who represents child patients regarding health-harming legal issues.

The Department of Children and Families collaborates in the development of a diversion program inside juvenile justice residential facilities.

Norwalk Public Schools collaborates in the development of a toolkit and training on best practices in educating immigrant students who have experienced severe trauma, have had interrupted formal schooling and are learning English.

The Court Support Services Division of the Judicial Department collaborates on CCA’s Racial and Ethnic Disparities Reduction Committees in four cities.

The International Institute of Connecticut collaborates on ensuring undocumented immigrant youth have legal representation in state court and immigration court.

CCA also collaborates with more than 25 organizations that refer children to CCA for legal services, provide space for meetings and trainings, and work with CCA on collaborative efforts to reform systems.
Board Chair
David Cooney JD
Company Affiliation RisCassi & Davis
Term June 2017 to May 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Charleen Merced Agosto Jose Antonio Pol & Associates
Genea O. Bell Community Volunteer
Scott Brabant
David Cooney RisCassi & Davis
Marilyn Diaz Retired
Timothy Diemand Wiggin and Dana
Kathryn Emmett, JD Emmett & Glander
Barbara Hennessy Aetna
Claude Mayo Goodwin College
Elise Rosen Community Volunteer
Arnold Rutkin Rutkin, Oldham & Griffin
Martha Stone, JD Center for Children's Advocacy
Eric Sussman Day Pitney
Antonia Thompson City of Stamford
Gavin von Loeser Anticus Advisors
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 2 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 6
Unspecified 2
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Miriam Berkman
John C. Brittain
Brett Dignam
L. Philip Guzman
Wesley Horton
Elizabeth Morgan
Eileen Silverstein
Preston Tisdale
Stanley A. Twardy, Jr.
Stephen Wizner
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2017
Fiscal Year End June 30 2018
Projected Revenue $2,221,882.00
Projected Expenses $2,221,882.00
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Audit Documents
Audit FY162016
Audit2015
Audit2014
Audit2013
Audit2011
Audit2010
Audit2009
Audit2008
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Tax-Exempt Letter
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Annual Report2016View
Annual Report2014View
Annual Report2013View
Annual Report2012View
Annual Report2011View
Our Kids2009View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,296,428$928,347$996,124
Government Contributions$0$408,301$366,327
Federal------
State--$408,301--
Local----$80,000
Unspecified----$286,327
Individual Contributions------
------
$479,481$514,995$463,258
Investment Income, Net of Losses($111)$2,344($123)
Membership Dues------
Special Events$88,359$80,720$83,340
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$1,595$4,293$2,772
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$1,907,209$1,750,928$1,638,232
Administration Expense$93,954$109,818$106,729
Fundraising Expense$8,735$4,944$6,602
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.931.041.09
Program Expense/Total Expenses95%94%94%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue1%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$1,288,179$1,437,203$1,392,641
Current Assets$1,246,448$1,384,991$1,378,209
Long-Term Liabilities$6,597$6,094$11,870
Current Liabilities$5,082$10,463$33,435
Total Net Assets$1,276,500$1,420,646$1,347,336
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Bar Foundation $399,090CT Bar Foundation $471,149CT Bar Foundation $439,102
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountOpen Society Foundation $173,000Tow Foundation $252,600Hartford Foundation for Public Giving $133,530
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountMelville Charitable Trust $101,154Hartford Foundation for Public Giving $88,828Robert Wood Johnson Foundation $90,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities245.27132.3741.22
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets1%0%1%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 65 Elizabeth Street
Hartford, CT 06105
Primary Phone 860 570-5327
Contact Email mstone@cca-ct.org
CEO/Executive Director Martha Stone, JD
Board Chair David Cooney JD
Board Chair Company Affiliation RisCassi & Davis

 

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