Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance
2470 Fairfield Ave
Bridgeport CT 06605
Contact Information
Address 2470 Fairfield Ave
Bridgeport, CT 06605-
Telephone (203) 579-2727 x323
Fax 203-333-9118
E-mail abby@ctjja.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance works to reduce the number of children and youth entering the juvenile and criminal justice system, and advocate a safe, effective, and fair system for those involved.

The Alliance accomplishes its mission by serving as a catalyst for systems reform. It employs the following strategies in pursuit of its mission:

  • Legislative education and advocacy
  • Strategic communications
  • Community organizing
  • National, state, and local partnerships
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1994
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Abby Anderson
Board Chair Robert Francis
Board Chair Company Affiliation Regional Youth Adult Social Action Partnership
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $330,000.00
Projected Expenses $330,000.00
Statements
Mission

The Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance works to reduce the number of children and youth entering the juvenile and criminal justice system, and advocate a safe, effective, and fair system for those involved.

The Alliance accomplishes its mission by serving as a catalyst for systems reform. It employs the following strategies in pursuit of its mission:

  • Legislative education and advocacy
  • Strategic communications
  • Community organizing
  • National, state, and local partnerships
Background
Fiscal Agent: RYASAP - the Regional Youth/Adult Social Action Partnership, is an urban/suburban youth and community development coalition working to ensure the safe and healthy development of young adults and families. Founded in 1985, RYASAP functions as a regional coordinating body, mobilizing youth and adults, nurturing individual and collective strengths, empowering communities to ease social problems, and effecting community change.
 
The Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance was launched in 2001 as a collaborative of RYASAP, the Center for Children’s Advocacy, Connecticut Voices for Children, and the Tow Foundation.
 
The Alliance was founded to fill a unique gap; there is no other statewide policy and advocacy nonprofit program or organization targeting juvenile justice system reform and thereby positively impacting every Connecticut community, including the greater New Haven region.
 
The Alliance's coalition effort is rooted in the philosophy of collaboration and partnership. A true working coalition of dedicated child advocates who are individually focused on the law, funding, research, direct service and parent advocacy, each Alliance member is committed to its own efforts for child and youth welfare and development and policy reform, as well as to the collective efforts of the group. 
Impact The Alliance's vision is a Connecticut where:
 
(A) Children and youth remain in and find all needed supports in their home community.
 
(B) The juvenile justice system is rehabilitative and provides those involved with the support they need to successfully re-integrate back into their home community.

(C) Families, schools, communities and government work together to meet the social, emotional, physical and intellectual needs of all children and youth.

The Alliance has made great strides toward accomplishing this vision:
  1. Raising the age of juvenile jurisdiction from 16 to 18 years old and ensuring services are in place for implementation. Except for the most serious charges, 16-year-olds moved to the juvenile justice system starting January 1, 2010. Before that, the state was one of only three to automatically prosecute children that young as adults. 17-year-olds entered the juvenile system July 1, 2012.
  2. Ensuring implementation of the Families With Service Needs (FWSN) reform, which is keeping up to 4,000 juvenile status offenders from escalating into delinquency each year and giving them the critical supports they need.
  3. Addressing issues of overlap in the education/juvenile justice systems, including reducing school-based arrests.
  4. Addressing Disproportionate Minority Contact in the juvenile justice system, keeping kids of color from entering the system simply based on the color of their skin.
Needs

 The Alliance works as a broad coalition, rooted in the philosophy of collaboration and partnership. Critical to the success of the Alliance's work is statewide reform through both collective as well as individual efforts. It finds mutually beneficial ways to work with statewide agencies, professional organizations, local and state leaders, among others. The most pressing current needs are to:

  1. Build the capacity of new, critical juvenile justice system stakeholder groups (Local Interagency Services Teams [LISTs]);
  2. Ensure the successful raising the age of juvenile jurisdiction from 16-18 (affecting approximately 15,000 children per year), including keeping services (e.g., mental health support for children and their families, substance abuse treatment, educational support, vocational training, etc.) in place to help children succeed;
  3. Address pressing issues with an education/juvenile justice system overlap, including reducing school-based arrests and other forms of exclusionary discipline.
  4. Reduce disproportionate minority contact (DMC) in partnership with the state's Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee.
CEO Statement
I am grateful for the opportunity to lead such a dynamic and vibrant organization.  Our Steering Committee members are a formidable 'Who's Who' of children's advocates in Connecticut, working in a truly collaborative manner to ensure that all of our individual efforts harmonize to create one strong voice for juvenile justice reform. The Alliance has also built strong relationships with state agencies and leaders, so it serves in both the "outsider" and "insider" role, serving as a bridge between the two.  We also serve as a bridge between local and state reform; we are at all the local tables listening to what is, and is not, working on the ground, and bringing those messages to the state to make appropriate and supportive changes.
 
Together, our efforts are significantly improving outcomes for kids and families for the better; we are positively effecting thousands of lives and helping to create more hopeful and secure futures. This work is not only morally responsible, it is also fiscally responsible / preventive in nature, and improves public safety at the same time.
 
Thank you for your time in reviewing our profile, I am happy to talk directly if you have any questions or concerns. We appreciate your, and the Community Foundation's, support and partnership. 
Board Chair Statement

We are proud to lead the Steering Committee of the Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance, and look forward to building on the impressive success of the past decade of reform.

Staff and Steering Committee members of the Alliance are tireless advocates in their daily, individual roles. Although each member may not be engaged in every issue the Alliance pursues, each is involved in some aspect of the overall reform, based on their own mission, and area of expertise or practice. Taken together, this leverages much more change than any one member could achieve alone; each can draw on the others for assistance. The Alliance has also built relationships with key legislators, most notably in New Haven, who sponsor and attend events and also advise the Alliance regarding key messaging strategies.
 
Thank you for taking the time to get to know us better.
 
Sincerely,
Robert Francis (RYASAP) and Christine Rapillo, Esq. (Office of the Chief Public Defender)
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Crime & Legal - Related / Youth Violence Prevention
Secondary Organization Category Crime & Legal - Related / Youth Violence Prevention
Tertiary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Community Coalitions
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
The Alliance is focused on improving the juvenile justice system for ALL youth and families in Connecticut.  About 25%-28% of all referrals into the juvenile justice system are from the New Haven court district.
Programs
Description State: The Alliance created and manages an Education Working Group, including the State Department of Education, advocates, researchers and legal aid organizations, to discuss needed reforms and collaborate towards their accomplishment. The group works to reduce the "school to prison pipeline," ensuring that the efforts are complimentary, not duplicative. 
 
Local: The Alliance partners with Local Interagency Services Teams (LIST) in each juvenile court district. LISTs gather all those working locally to share information, network, discuss current services and gaps, receive training, etc., to meet the needs of the area’s children and families.
 
National: The Alliance is a member of and serves on the executive committee of the National Juvenile Justice Network, enhancing the ability of statewide juvenile justice coalitions to advocate for fair, equitable and developmentally appropriate adjudication and treatment for all youth and families involved in the juvenile justice system.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / K-12 (5-19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Every reform that moves the system more towards prevention, early intervention and community-based treatment is a step in the right direction.  Every time a child in the system is seen as a whole child and not simply as a "delinquent" to be "fixed' is a step in the right direction.
 
By July 2012, success means 17 year olds being treated in the juvenile rather than adult system. 
Success also means reduction in school-based arrests and a greater understanding of how schools, courts and police can work together toward this shared goal.  It means better, higher quality reporting on the quantity and kind of school-based arrests that happen in each school district.
The Alliance also is working on policy and practice changes to reduce the impact of racial disparity in the juvenile justice system.  Data shows that minority youth in Connecticut are treated more harshly because of the color of their skin. Short term success means this continues to change.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long-term success will be achieved when Connecticut's juvenile justice system will: 
        
• Be of the highest possible quality and will not substitute for quality children’s mental health and education. 
• Treat all children and families equally, regardless of their race or ethnicity.
• Be strengths-based, rehabilitative and community-based.
• Be child and family centered 
• Track and regularly report its outcomes
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The Alliance is at all the major statewide policy tables related to juvenile justice system reform including the Juvenile Jurisdiction Policy and Oversight Coordinating Council, the Families With Service Needs Advisory Board, the Joint Juvenile Justice Strategic Plan Executive Implementation Team (and subcommittees) and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (and subcommittees). These tables all allow the Alliance to play a role in monitoring the current system while pushing for implementation of further reforms. In addition, many Steering Committee members focus on direct services to youth and families, and alert us if any issues or challenges arise with implementation. The LISTs will continue to serve a similar role in monitoring and identifying unmet needs. This information helps the Alliance understand if and how policy changes filter to the ground level, and in turn, the Alliance then brings this information back to the policy tables to discuss further education and/or reforms to address the problems.
Description

The Alliance systematically collects, synthesizes and disseminates new research and other critical information related to juvenile justice reform. Most recently the Alliance published a white paper entitled 'Safe and Sound' which analyzes a decade of data to demonstrate how juvenile justice reform in the state was accompanied by a decrease in juvenile crime, violent crime and recidivism. By holding youth accountable through community based programs and using expensive alternatives, such as incarceration, sparingly, reforms have saved the state money as well.

The Alliance gives presentations statewide, most recently to (and at) the State Legislature, Coalition of Juvenile Justice, the Department of Education, and at local colleges. The Alliance was a key contributor to the CPTV documentary ‘From Education to Incarceration.'

The Alliance provides technical assistance to local communities by sharing data and national models that build their capacity to advocate for their youth.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / K-12 (5-19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Every reform that moves the system more towards prevention, early intervention and community-based treatment is a step in the right direction. Every time a child in the system is seen as a whole child and not simply as a "delinquent" to be "fixed' is a step in the right direction.

 

By July 2012, success means 17 year olds being treated in the juvenile rather than adult system. Success also means reduction in school-based arrests and a greater understanding of how schools, courts and police can work together toward this shared goal. It means better, higher quality reporting on the quantity and kind of school-based arrests that happen in each school district. The Alliance also is working on policy and practice changes to reduce the impact of racial disparity in the juvenile justice system. Data shows that minority youth in Connecticut are treated more harshly because of the color of their skin. Short term success means this continues to change.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Key stakeholders will have an increased awareness, knowledge, and understanding and an increased awareness about options to effectively address critical issues of juvenile justice reform.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

The Alliance is at all the major statewide policy tables related to juvenile justice system reform including the Juvenile Jurisdiction Policy and Oversight Coordinating Council, the Families With Service Needs Advisory Board, the Joint Juvenile Justice Strategic Plan Executive Implementation Team (and subcommittees) and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (and subcommittees). These tables all allow the Alliance to play a role in monitoring the current system while pushing for implementation of further reforms. In addition, many Steering Committee members focus on direct services to youth and families, and alert us if any issues or challenges arise with implementation. The LISTs will continue to serve a similar role in monitoring and identifying unmet needs. This information helps the Alliance understand if and how policy changes filter to the ground level, and in turn, the Alliance then brings this information back to the policy tables to discuss further education and/or reforms to address the problems.

Description

The Alliance serves as the bridge between local and state efforts; community organizing is central to achieving its mission. One recent example is a two-year-long series of community forums focused on the intersections between education and juvenile justice. With LISTs and other local partners as sponsors and key partners, forums bring together experts and stakeholders to hear about and discuss:

  • Positive school climate
  • The effect that exclusionary discipline practices (suspension, expulsion) have on a community and how to reduce their use;
  • The crisis of school-based arrest rates, how (and why) to reduce them;
  • The role of School Resource Officers (SROs);
  • The need for, and better use of, data.
Half of these forums featured the CPTV documentary, Education vs. Incarceration; the CT Corporation for Public Broadcasting contracted with the Alliance to conduct a major outreach campaign using the film. Please see the special section of our website, www.ctjja.org, for more information.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / K-12 (5-19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Every reform that moves the system more towards prevention, early intervention and community-based treatment is a step in the right direction. Every time a child in the system is seen as a whole child and not simply as a "delinquent" to be "fixed' is a step in the right direction.


Starting July 2012, success means 16 and 17 year-olds are treated in the juvenile rather than adult system. Success also means reduction in school-based arrests and a greater understanding of how schools, courts and police can work together toward this shared goal. It means better, higher quality reporting on the quantity and kind of school-based arrests that happen in each school district. The Alliance also is working on policy and practice changes to reduce the impact of racial disparity in the juvenile justice system. Data shows that minority youth in Connecticut are treated more harshly because of the color of their skin. Short term success means this continues to change.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Long-term success will be achieved when Connecticut's juvenile justice system will:

• Be of the highest possible quality and will not substitute for quality children’s mental health and education. 

• Treat all children and families equally, regardless of their race or ethnicity.

• Be strengths-based, rehabilitative and community-based.

• Be child and family centered 

• Track and regularly report its outcomes

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

The Alliance is at all the major statewide policy tables related to juvenile justice system reform including the Juvenile Jurisdiction Policy and Oversight Coordinating Council, the Families With Service Needs Advisory Board, the Joint Juvenile Justice Strategic Plan Executive Implementation Team (and subcommittees) and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (and subcommittees). These tables all allow the Alliance to play a role in monitoring the current system while pushing for implementation of further reforms. In addition, many Steering Committee members focus on direct services to youth and families, and alert us if any issues or challenges arise with implementation. The LISTs will continue to serve a similar role in monitoring and identifying unmet needs. This information helps the Alliance understand if and how policy changes filter to the ground level, and in turn, the Alliance then brings this information back to the policy tables to discuss further education and/or reforms to address the problems.

Description The Alliance is a key leader of an active coalition of activists, parents, state agency professionals and youth known as the 'Raise the Age' campaign. The campaign successfully advocated for a sweeping policy change to return 16 and 17 year old youth to juvenile jurisdiction and resulted in landmark legislation that returned 16-year-olds to juvenile jurisdiction on January 1, 2010; and will return 17-year-olds juvenile jurisdiction in 2012.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / K-12 (5-19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
  • 16 year-olds will stay in the juvenile justice system (except for all but the most serious crimes);
  • 17 year-olds will be handled in the juvenile justice system as of July 1, 2012.
  • Sufficient funding will be appropriated to state agencies for Raise the Age-related programs and services.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

 

  • Key stakeholders will begin to consider judicial rather than prosecutorial discretion in transfer/waiver situations.

 

 
  • New “Raise the Age” system reform, processes, and related programs and services will be transparently monitored and evaluated to ensure desired outcomes are achieved (i.e., Alliance watchdog role).
  • Results of monitoring and evaluation will be utilized to continuously improve system, processes, programs and services to address the needs of youth / families.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

The Alliance is at all the major statewide policy tables related to juvenile justice system reform including the Juvenile Jurisdiction Policy and Oversight Coordinating Council, the Families With Service Needs Advisory Board, the Joint Juvenile Justice Strategic Plan Executive Implementation Team (and subcommittees) and the Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee (and subcommittees). These tables all allow the Alliance to play a role in monitoring the current system while pushing for implementation of further reforms. In addition, many Steering Committee members focus on direct services to youth and families, and alert us if any issues or challenges arise with implementation. The LISTs will continue to serve a similar role in monitoring and identifying unmet needs. This information helps the Alliance understand if and how policy changes filter to the ground level, and in turn, the Alliance then brings this information back to the policy tables to discuss further education and/or reforms to address the problems.

CEO/Executive Director
Abby Anderson
Term Start Sept 2004
Email abby@ctjja.org
Experience Served as Sr. Policy Analyst for CTJJA from 9/2004 through 10/2008 when assumed Executive Director role.  Full responsibility for Raise the Age CT campaign since 2005. Previously in development department of large multi-service nonprofit.  Masters degree in Nonprofit Management.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 2
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr. Hector Glynn Mar 2007 - Sept 2008
Mr. Fernando Muniz Apr 2004 - Dec 2006
Senior Staff
Title Senior Policy Analyst
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Board Chair
Robert Francis
Company Affiliation Regional Youth Adult Social Action Partnership
Term Sept 2000 to Sept 2014
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Jamey Bell Connecticut Voices for Children
Erica Bromley Connecticut Youth Services Association
Andrew Clark Institution for Study of Crime and Justice
Ann-Marie DeGraffenreidt Department of Children and Families
Alexandra Dufresne Connecticut Voices for Children
Bob Franks CT Center for Effective Practice
Hal Gibber FAVOR
John Gill Children's Community Programs
Hector Glynn The Village for Children
Dawn Hatchett Family Services Woodfield
Cathy Holahan Connecticut Legal Services
Mickey Kramer Office of Child Advocate
Maureen Price-Boreland Community Partners in Action
Christine Rapillo Office of Chief Public Defender
Diane Sierpina Tow Foundation
Ann Smith AFCAMP
Martha Stone Center for Children's Advocacy
Emily Tow Jackson Tow Foundation
Amy Vatner AFCAMP
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 14
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 14
Unspecified 0
Board Co-Chair
Christine Rapillo
Company Affiliation Office of the Chief Public Defender
Term Sept 2007 to Sept 2014
Email Christine.Rapillo@jud.ct.gov
CEO Comments
The Alliance board is a Steering Committee because the Alliance legally operates under the RYASAP board.  Alliance Steering Committee serves as primarily a policy board, focused on how to move the issue of juvenile justice reform forward in a steady, coordinated way.  The board does take on fundraising responsibilities to some extent.  As a policy board, there are no strict rules about term limits.  When there is a gap from a specific "sector" an ad hoc committee meets to discuss an organization or individual to add.  To date, the organization mostly avoids members who work for state agencies, making exceptions for the public defender representative and an advocate who was on the Steering Committee first and then went to work for the state.  She is sometimes asked to recuse herself from particular conversations that could represent a conflict of interest.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2012
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2012
Projected Revenue $330,000.00
Projected Expenses $330,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902011
Form 9902010
Form 9902009
Form 9902008
Form 9902007
IRS Letter of Exemption
RYASAP 501c3 letter
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
CTJJA Quick Fact Sheet2011View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201120102009
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$290,228$333,307$331,322
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$10,195$1,115--
------
--$770--
Investment Income, Net of Losses------
Membership Dues------
Special Events$2,500$4,583$2,631
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$26,740----
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201120102009
Program Expense$299,319$312,142$301,535
Administration Expense$31,258$29,004$22,992
Fundraising Expense--$806$848
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.000.991.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses91%91%93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201120102009
Total Assets------
Current Assets------
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets------
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201120102009
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountPublic Welfare Foundation $75,000Public Welfare Foundation $75,000CT Health Foundation $85,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Health Foundation $75,000CT Health Foundation $75,000Public Welfare $75,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Tow Foundation $50,000The Tow Foundation $50,000Campaign for Youth Justice $50,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201120102009
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201120102009
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets------
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments

The Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance is special entity whereby its Steering Committee is responsible directly to the RYASAP Board of Directors and the Executive Director of CTJJA is responsible to the CTJJA Steering Committee, whose Co-Chairperson is the Executive Director of RYASAP.

 CTJJA has the following fiscal relationship with RYASAP:
    1. RYASAP processes all of CTJJA’s accounts payable requests, including generating checks to pay such requests.
    2. The RYASAP Executive Director signs all official CTJJA financial documents including checks and official financial agreements in consultation with the CTJJA Executive Director.
    3. RYASAP manages the CTJJA bank accounts.
    4. RYASAP provides fiscal reports to all of CTJJA’s funders according to the requirements of each funder.
    5. RYASAP provides at least quarterly reports to the CTJJA Executive Director of the fiscal condition of CTJJA.
    6. RYASAP manages all CTJJA revenue and expenses as a separate cost center.
    7. All payroll and benefits for the employees of CTJJA are  in accordance with the Personnel Polices of RYASAP, and contractual agreements between RYASAP and its staff.
    8. CTJJA is audited as part of RYASAP’s annual audit unless CTJJA needs a separate audit for one of its funders. A fee is negotiated in advance if this is necessary.
    9. RYASAP carries board and staff liability insurance for CTJJA staff and Steering Committee members.
    10. RYASAP provides consultation in the preparation of overall CTJJA budget and budgets for grant applications.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foundation Staff Comments
The Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance operates under the 501c3 of RYASAP. The 990s and audits contained in this profile are those for RYASAP. The previous three years of financial information in the profile is specific to the Juvenile Justice Alliance.
 
This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 2470 Fairfield Ave
Bridgeport, CT 06605
Primary Phone 203 579-2727 323
Contact Email abby@ctjja.org
CEO/Executive Director Abby Anderson
Board Chair Robert Francis
Board Chair Company Affiliation Regional Youth Adult Social Action Partnership

 

Related Information

Promote Civic Vitality

Greater New Haven’s vibrancy is linked to its communities’ support of its neighborhoods, public gardens and sports, as well as its commitment to the protection of its people and pets.