Corporation For Supportive Housing
61 Broadway
Suite 2300
New York NY 10006
Contact Information
Address 61 Broadway
Suite 2300
New York, NY 10006-
Telephone (212) 986-2966 x
Fax 212-986-6522
E-mail info@csh.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
To advance solutions that use housing as a platform for services to improve the lives of the most vulnerable people, maximize public resources and build healthy communities.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1991
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms Deborah De Santis
Board Chair Stephen Norman
Board Chair Company Affiliation King County Housing Authority
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $37,531,314.00
Projected Expenses $37,022,763.00
Statements
Mission To advance solutions that use housing as a platform for services to improve the lives of the most vulnerable people, maximize public resources and build healthy communities.
Background

CSH transforms how communities use housing solutions to improve the lives of the most vulnerable people. We offer capital, expertise, information and innovation that allow our partners to use supportive housing to achieve stability, strength and success for the people in most need. CSH blends over 25 years of experience and dedication with a practical and entrepreneurial spirit, making us the source for housing solutions. CSH is an industry leader with national influence and deep connections in a growing number of local communities. We are headquartered in New York City with staff stationed in more than 20 locations around the country. Visit csh.org to learn how CSH has and can make a difference where you live.

Impact

CSH transforms how communities use supportive housing to improve the lives of the most vulnerable people. Our cost-effective solutions are proven to work for the men, women and children trapped in crisis and at risk of homelessness.

CSH is a data-driven organization, dedicated to achieving measurable results. We have presented over 538 training events in 2015 alone, reaching over 19,000 participants, and made over $500 million in loans and grants to date, and we’re working in more than 30 states across three regions of the country.

CSH is committed to elevating supportive housing to a new level of innovation and excellence over the next three years. 

Needs

CSH is a national nonprofit intermediary organization with 118 full-time staff stationed in over 26 locations throughout the United States.  To support our national teams and local hub offices:, CSH has a need for:

(1) In-kind/pro-bono services to support our efforts to strengthen our IT and Communications infrastructure.

(2) Core support for our local hub offices. Flexible funding is critical to underwriting important pieces of our work that are difficult to fund otherwise, include our system change efforts and evaluation of promising new supportive housing models.

(3) Seed funding for our demonstration programs for the most vulnerable and underserved homeless sub-populations, including those at great risk of early mortality and (4) child-welfare-involved families and children, and (5) frequent users of jail, shelter, emergency rooms, and acute care.
CEO Statement

With over 25 years of experience, CSH is an industry leader with national influence and deep connections in a growing number local communities. 

All of CSH’s housing solutions integrate supportive housing. Supportive housing is a proven intervention that uses housing as a platform for services that create opportunities for recovery, personal growth and life-long success.

CSH blends our experience and dedication with a practical and entrepreneurial spirit. We uncover ways to move forward even in the most complex environments, so our partners can achieve stability, strength and success for the most vulnerable people in the communities where they live.


Board Chair Statement

CSH is setting our sights on a new future for our organization, our industry and the people who live in supportive housing. Over the past two decades, we’ve learned that homelessness is not just the result of poverty, but also is a symptom of other challenges. It’s an effect, caused by multiple, co-occurring problems like sickness, substance use, mental illness and other chronic health issues. That’s why CSH is looking beyond homelessness as we envision the future for supportive housing. It’s time to address the root problems that create turmoil in the lives of the most vulnerable people among us, and CSH is poised to lead the supportive housing field in that new direction.

It’s no longer just about introducing supportive housing to communities — CSH is ready to use supportive housing to solve some of the most complex and costly social problems our country faces. For communities searching for smarter ways of addressing problems related to homelessness, CSH is an invaluable partner. Our work touches every part of supportive housing solutions, from idea to implementation. We built this industry and we will help create its future.




 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Alliances & Advocacy
Secondary Organization Category Housing, Shelter / Fund Raising & Fund Distribution
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / Centers to Support the Independence of Specific Populations
Areas Served
Throughout the United States
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
CSH is a national organization headquartered in New York that has staff stationed in more than 26 locations around the country.
Programs
Description

From idea to implementation, CSH is the source for housing solutions. We are a touchstone for new ideas and best practices. We are a collaborative and pragmatic community partner as well as an influential advocate for supportive housing.

 

CSH works across 4 lines of business:

·      Training and Education
CSH enriches the industry with research-backed tools, trainings and knowledge sharing.

·      Lending
CSH galvanizes supportive housing solutions with powerful capital funds, specialty loan products and development expertise.

·      Consulting and Assistance
CSH collaborates on custom community planning and cutting-edge innovations.

·      Policy Reform
CSH engages government leaders and public agencies through systems reform, policy collaboration and advocacy.

Population Served At-Risk Populations / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

CSH is committed to elevating supportive housing to a new level of innovation and excellence over the next three years. 

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. We envision a future in which high-quality supportive housing solutions are integrated into the way every community serves the men, women and children in most need.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Internal 'Measuring Success' performance measurement and management program, which tracks a rich set of data indicators on a monthly basis against annual targets for organizational performance. This program was recognized in 2008 by the White House as a promising practice.
Description Through the Social Innovation Fund (SIF) Healthy Futures pilot initiative, CSH is testing innovative models that address the health, housing, and social service needs of homeless individuals. The target population struggles with complex health challenges and are the highest-cost users of crisis health services. Our aim is to demonstrate how Supportive housing can break the expensive cycle that sees homeless people repeatedly encountering institutional systems – hospitals, jails, detox facilities, and crisis care services – without any marked improvement in long-term health and stability. Connecticut is one of four locations, and the only statewide model, where CSH is launching the project; Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Ann Arbor are the others. Together, these pilots will provide housing linked to health care coordination to a minimum of 549 individuals nationally. In Connecticut, CSH and our partners will serve 160 individuals. 
Population Served Homeless / People/Families of People with Health Conditions / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.  In year 2 of the SIF pilot, CSH’s objectives are to: 1) ensure smooth operations for the pilot and fidelity to the model’s core components, 2) produce a robust evaluation of the pilot and its impact on client-level outcomes and costs to the healthcare system in Connecticut, and 3) promote sustainable ways to fund services in housing via Medicaid.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The overarching goals of CSH's SIF initiative are to: 1) develop an innovative, replicable model programs for serving and housing high utilizers; 2) end homelessness and poor health outcomes for this population; and 3) improve health practitioner and system capacity to serve this high-need group.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

CSH and our partners will work to achieve these outcomes in Year 2:

  • Innovative, replicable models, which integrate housing with care management and coordinated primary and behavioral health services, are implemented and tested. 

  • House and comprehensively serve 160 high-need, high-cost individuals in Connecticut annually, completing placement of first cohort of individuals as key focus for Year 2. 

  • Mechanisms developed for supportive housing providers to receive greater reimbursement for care management and other support services via Medicaid.

  • Health practitioners and public systems actively participate in planning and implementation efforts for the pilot, strong buy-in for the approach cultivated among these groups.

  • Improved cross-sector coordination, greater coverage of supportive housing services in CT's Medicaid plan.

  • Evaluation begins to show that CT model improves health outcomes and contains costs.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.  Mike is a 53 year-old white male with a strong work history and ongoing close connections with his ex-girlfriend and her kids. Between January 2012 and January 2013, he had five emergency department visits and spent 80 days in the hospital as an inpatient, many of them in intensive care. Medicaid paid $147,000 for his care during that period of time.  He had not been to a primary care appointment since May 2012. After learning that he was eligible for the SIF program, Mike stated to the Patient Navigator, “I had pretty much given up.”  He has continued to experience frustration during the process of finding housing, and has had additional hospitalizations, but in April 2013, he began a new regimen of preventative care.  In the car on the way there, he stated that he was thinking about getting a job. Mike moved into his apartment in May 2013.  He has since experienced no more hospitalizations and prides himself on keeping a full refrigerator and cooking his favorite southern cuisine. 
Program Comments
CEO Comments CSH is setting our sights on a new future for our organization, our industry and the people who live in supportive housing. Over the past 25 years, we’ve learned that homelessness is not just the result of poverty, but also is a symptom of other challenges. It’s an effect, caused by multiple, co-occurring problems like sickness, substance use, mental illness and other chronic health issues.

That’s why CSH is looking beyond homelessness as we envision the future for supportive housing. It’s time to address the root problems that create turmoil in the lives of the most vulnerable people among us, and CSH is poised to lead the supportive housing field in that new direction.


CEO/Executive Director
Ms Deborah De Santis
Term Start Jan 2007
Email deborah.desantis@csh.org
Experience As CSH's chief executive officer, Deb De Santis supervises the senior management team in setting policy and managing the overall programmatic and administrative direction of CSH.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 118
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 0
Staff Retention Rate 87%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 12
Asian American/Pacific Islander 12
Caucasian 88
Hispanic/Latino 6
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 26
Female 92
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title VP Strategy and Impact
Title Chief Development Officer
Title Chief Operating Officer
Title Managing Director, Central Region
Title Chief Financial Officer
Title Managing Director, Western Region
Title VP Policy and External Affairs
Title VP Consulting and Field Operations
Title Managing Director, Eastern Region
Title Chief Lending Officer
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Collaborations

CSH is both a good partner and an excellent steward of resources as demonstrated by our exceptional ratings by such entities as Charity Navigator (4-star rating) and CARS, where CSH has a AAA+2 rating representing our strong impact and our financial strength. CSH has also been accepted into the S+I 100, an index of top nonprofits creating social impact.

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
CARS Rating AAA+2Opportunity Finance Network2014
Wachovia NEXT FinalistWachovia NEXT2009
Social Capitalist AwardFast Company2007
Nonprofit Excellence AwardsNonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York2013
Comments
CEO Comments CSH has been recognized for its unparalleled breadth and depth of knowledge about supportive housing provided in a distinctive way that delivers results for people experiencing long-term homelessness. Examples of recognition of CSH include: 

o   In 2009, the Wachovia NEXT Awards selected CSH as a finalist for being a pioneer in the supportive housing market by leveraging innovative policy work and financing.

o   In 2007, CSH received Fast Company’s Social Capitalist Award noting CSH’s innovative business model for addressing homelessness. 

o   In 2006 & 2008, CSH’s work was recognized via the prestigious Innovations in American Government Award from the Ash Institute for Democratic Governance and Innovation at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government for our work to create and support the Connecticut's Supportive Housing Pilots Initiative and the New York City Acquisition Fund.

o   In 2014, received an AAA+2 CARS rating by the Opportunity Finance Network. The AAA Impact Performance Rating is the highest of three possible ratings, signifying a clear alignment of mission, strategies, activities, and data. CSH received a ‘2' for Financial Strength and Performance. The Policy Plus rating reflects CSH’s intensive, effective policy work.

o   Charity Navigator 4-star rating for 3 consecutive years.

o   Winner of  Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York's 2013 Nonprofit Excellence Awards recognizing outstanding management practices among New York's large and diverse nonprofit community. 
Board Chair
Stephen Norman
Company Affiliation King County Housing Authority
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Jeffrey I. Brodsky CPMRelated Management
Deborah Burkhart National Equity Fund
Deborah De Santis Corporation for Supportive Housing
Rachel Diller Goldman Sachs Urban Investment Group
Mr. Pete Earley Author and Journalist
Ms. Dorothy Edwards Los Angeles Community Advocate
Mr. Don Falk Tenderloin Neighborhood Development Corporation
Sandra Forquer OptumHealth
Steven M. Friedman Ernst & Young
Roland Lamb Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services
Judge Steven Leifman Eleventh Judicial Circuit Court of Florida
Mr. Qahir Madhany Blackstone Real Estate
Ms. Michelle Norris National Church Residences Development Corporation
Mr. Jim O'Connell MDBoston Health Care for the Homeless Program
Ms. Carolyn Powell Non-Profit Practice Director, Centric Real Estate Advisors
Ms. Sherry Seiwert Executive Director, Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 14
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 9
Standing Committees
Audit
Board Governance
Project Oversight
CEO Comments

The Governance Committee has a standing conversation on Board recruitment and seeks to align board membership with governance needs and CSH’s strategic priorities. The committee maintains a tracking sheet with content/skill areas tied to these priorities and goals. Board members routinely contribute their expertise to CSH endeavors. CSH ramped up our targeted recruitment efforts over the past two years, and added new members with expertise in strategic areas including mainstream affordable housing development, health care, and American Indian/rural communities and to enhance fiscal oversight. These new members provide invaluable guidance and industry connections in order for CSH to foster deeper partnerships with public agencies and service providers in these sectors. For example, CSH’s new mission statement and strategic plan put emphasis on building healthy communities and engaging the health sector, as well as deploying and leveraging capital to integrate supportive housing into new communities. As a result, CSH voted in February 2013 to elect two new board members, Sandra Forquer, from OptumHealth, and Steve Friedman from Ernst and Young, whose experiences and ties in the health sector and real estate/mergers and acquisitions, respectively, make them strong additions to our board.

 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $37,531,314.00
Projected Expenses $37,022,763.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Revenue$29,866,569$32,923,593$22,790,678
Total Expenses$29,857,314$23,231,747$22,808,029
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$8,771,136$16,632,952$9,894,024
Government Contributions$2,803,000$3,900,000$1,947,000
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$2,803,000$3,900,000$1,947,000
Individual Contributions------
------
$17,823,270$11,851,961$10,569,641
Investment Income, Net of Losses$469,163$538,680$380,013
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$24,918,325$18,477,715$17,988,613
Administration Expense$4,709,741$4,129,263$3,757,874
Fundraising Expense$229,248$624,769$1,061,542
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.001.421.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses83%80%79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue2%3%9%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$124,569,171$115,651,026$94,123,166
Current Assets$104,892,665$86,075,841$64,506,536
Long-Term Liabilities$78,712,769$70,631,674$59,658,659
Current Liabilities$9,892,916$8,788,415$7,267,275
Total Net Assets$35,963,486$36,230,937$27,197,232
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Conrad Hilton Foundation $6,000,000 --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Houston Endowment Foundation $4,000,000 --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --The Kresge Foundation $2,000,000 --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities10.609.798.88
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets63%61%63%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments

CSH has undertaken several new approaches and policies in order to set our financial house in order and set the organization on course for greater financial stability and long-term self-sufficiency. In 2008, CSH recorded a decrease of $9.1MM in our net assets. While this drop reflected planned spend-down of multi-year grants secured in prior years, it also was symptomatic of the need for both better controls on organizational spending and stepped up fundraising efforts and earned income strategies. In response, CSH brought on a new CFO, charged with leading CSH in improving our financial management, and promoted an internal candidate to Chief Development Officer to ramp up our fundraising efforts. These staff have overseen several changes to our budgeting and financial policies, and fundraising practices, which has resulted in improved finances. Our new CFO developed CSH’s first, formal (written) investment policy for our cash, resulting in a more aggressive investment approach, which has provided a better return and more earned income. Our CFO also examined CSH’s sources of lending capital for our loan program and assessed that much of the funds CSH borrows from banks (to re-lend to SH projects) were lying idle, and we often experienced negative arbitrage, meaning we were paying a higher rate of interest to the banks than we were charging to our borrowers. In consultation with our Board, Executives, and lending team, the CFO developed a new policy of only accepting bank loans at ≤3.5% interest and limiting the amount of excess loan capital on hand at any given time. CSH paid back $21MM in high-cost loan funds in 2010/11. These steps resulted in savings of $750,000 per year. 


 
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 61 Broadway
Suite 2300
New York, NY 10006
Primary Phone 212 986-2966
Contact Email info@csh.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms Deborah De Santis
Board Chair Stephen Norman
Board Chair Company Affiliation King County Housing Authority

 

Related Information

Meet Basic Needs

A strong community not only meets its members’ basic needs but also works to create long-term solutions to their problems. Provide people with affordable housing, enough to eat and access to affordable health care and you enable them to envision a better future for themselves.