Peabody Museum of Natural History, Yale University
PO Box 208118
New Haven CT 06520-8118
Contact Information
Address PO Box 208118
New Haven, CT 06520-8118
Telephone (203) 432-8987 x
Fax 203-432-6575
E-mail peabody.development@yale.edu
Web and Social Media
A statue of Torosaurus greets visitors to the Peabody along Whitney Avenue.
Mission

The mission of the Peabody Museum is to serve Yale University by advancing our understanding of earth’s history through geological, biological, and anthropological research, and by communicating the results of this research to the widest possible audience through publication, exhibition, and educational programs. Fundamental to this mission is stewardship of the museum’s rich collections, which provide a remarkable record of the history of the earth, its life, and its cultures. Conservation, augmentation and use of these collections become increasingly urgent as modern threats to the diversity of life and culture continue to intensify.  Approved by the Corporation of Yale University, February 25, 1995.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1701
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Professor David Skelly
Board Chair David Skelly
Board Chair Company Affiliation Director, Yale Peabody Museum
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $0.00
Projected Expenses $0.00
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Peabody Museum is to serve Yale University by advancing our understanding of earth’s history through geological, biological, and anthropological research, and by communicating the results of this research to the widest possible audience through publication, exhibition, and educational programs. Fundamental to this mission is stewardship of the museum’s rich collections, which provide a remarkable record of the history of the earth, its life, and its cultures. Conservation, augmentation and use of these collections become increasingly urgent as modern threats to the diversity of life and culture continue to intensify.  Approved by the Corporation of Yale University, February 25, 1995.

Background

Systematic collecting of specimens for teaching and research at Yale began in 1802 with the appointment of Benjamin Silliman as Professor of Chemistry and Natural History. The outstanding mineral collection Silliman built for Yale became an important source of public entertainment and one of the principal attractions for visitors to New Haven. Among the undergraduates attracted to the Yale by its scientific reputation was Othniel Charles Marsh who persuaded his uncle, George Peabody, to give $150,000 to Yale for the construction and care of a museum building for its collections.  O.C. Marsh was appointed Professor of Paleontology at Yale in 1866, the first such professorship in the United States.


The first Peabody Museum building opened to the public in 1876, but its capacity was soon strained by the huge dinosaur bones that Marsh’s collectors were sending in to the rapidly growing collections. Construction of the present building was finished in 1924, and the two-story Great Hall was specifically designed to accommodate some of O.C. Marsh’s dinosaurs, such the mounting of the giant "Brontosaurus” (Apatosaurus). In 1947 Rudolph F. Zallinger finished the fresco secco painting that is probably the Yale Peabody Museum’s best known feature, the 110-foot mural, “The Age of Reptiles,” on the south wall of the Great Hall. The Museum also has permanent exhibits dedicated to human and mammal evolution; wildlife dioramas; Egyptian artifacts; Connecticut birds; minerals, meterorites and gems; and Native American cultures. 

The Museum established its Public Education Program over 85 years ago, and today this office oversees visits from over 30,000 schoolchildren per year from all over New England, as well as extensive teacher professional development programs, and the management of the Museum’s Discovery Room, a facility that provides interactive hands-on exhibits for over 90,000 children annually.

In recognition of the importance of conserving the collections and of enabling scientists and scholars to study them properly, the University constructed the new Class of 1954 Environmental Science Center to house approximately half of the Museum’s collections and to provide space for collections-based teaching and research. In addition, Yale’s 136-acre West Campus is home to several Yale Peabody Museum research collections that support faculty, students and visiting scholars studying biodiversity, global change and the history of life and civilizations. 
Impact

Accomplishments last year:
1) The Peabody Museum through the Evolutions After School Program and internships for high school students further helped students to pursue college and future careers in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The goal of Evolutions is to provide youth with basic job and teaching skills, in addition to highlighting science and museum careers, by employing students as interpreters in the exhibition galleries. 2) Samurai and the Culture of Japan’s Great Peace brought to life the many-layered history of the samurai and those they ruled—a history full of drama and paradox. The Museum exhibited more than 150 spectacular artifacts from four Yale collections—the Peabody Museum, Yale University Art Gallery, Yale Collection of Musical Instruments, and the Sterling Memorial Library. 3) Public programs continued to grow with teacher professional development seminars, lectures and summer institute. The community festivals and events included Fiesta Latina - a celebration of Latin American cultures, Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Legacy of Environmental and Social Justice, Dinosaur Days, Paleo-Knowledge Bowl, Summer's Last Roar. 4) Collection-improvement grants in Invertebrate Zoology, Vertebrate Paleontology, and Anthropology continued to help the Museum move collections into the highest-grade museum storage for safe keeping.

   

 

Needs Secure funding for short- and long-term projects including:  (1) public events, (2) internships for after-school program's career-ladder, (3) renovation of Fossil Halls, (4) Connecticut Bird Hall renovation.
CEO Statement

One of the most fundamental challenges of the 21st Century is the documentation and conservation of the world's cultural and biological diversity. As part of a University with a strong commitment to environmental research, the Yale Peabody Museum, with its world-class collections (numbering over 12 million specimens and growing), is able to bring tremendous resources to bear in addressing this challenge. Our mission, to advance knowledge and a broad understanding of Earth's history, life and cultures has never been more important. Every year, our Curators and staff conduct field research on every continent while advanced technologies help us draw fresh information from specimens, some of which have been in the collections for decades. Our educational activities inspire people, especially children, with a love for the natural and cultural world and an appreciation of its importance to human health and wellbeing.
 
Global change brings new urgency to questions the Museum has asked throughout its distinguished history - what species exist on Earth, where they live, and how they have changed over time. It also means that increasing public understanding and engagement with these issues is of vital importance. Whether you visit us in person or online, whether you come to learn about our collections or simply have fun, I hope you will be excited to join us in this mission.

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Education / Higher Education
Secondary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Natural History, Natural Science Museums
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
National
International
For all of the Museum's educational and family events and programs, the greatest visitorship is from New Haven and surrounding communities.  However, people visit the Museum from all over CT as well as NY and NJ.  Every year, the Curators and staff conduct field research on every continent and bring back specimens to add to the collections.  Specimens from the collections are studied by scientists all over the world both at the Peabody and through Museum loans.
Programs
Description The Peabody Fellows Programs are are a series of in-depth professional development opportunities for K-12 teachers and include: Event-Based Collaborative (EB), Biodiversity & Vector-Bourne Disease (BVB).  They
EB: This professional development opportunity will help social studies teachers acquire the skills they need to turn existing materials into an exciting problem-based teaching and learning strategy. Through Event-Based methodology, participants use video or firsthand acounts of actual events combined with additional primary sources to establish real-world connections and context. Teachers will work individually and in small groups to create EB units from their own lessons. The program guides teachers through an “objects and inquiry” approach, using the Peabody's specimens and resources.
BVB: helps teachers show children new ways to view their environment, strengthen their observational and investigative skills. Curriculum development and national dissemination.
Population Served Adults / K-12 (5-19 years) /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Teachers who go through the program will be more comfortable and more knowledgeable about teaching science in the classroom.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Students will be better equipped to understand science and the relevancy of science to their lives.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The program is independently evaluated by SageFox Consulting Group which shows that the program is effective.
Description The EVOLUTIONS program supplements the formal school experiences of students comprehensively and in a manner relevant to developing their future aspirations and success in college and future careers in science, technology, engineering, and math. The program design features clear goals and objectives, long-term project-based learning, individualized and small group instruction, tutoring and mentoring, and a philosophy of supporting every student to succeed in the program. For participants in the career ladder component, SciCORPS, learning comes full circle as they themselves become “educators” in the Museum’s galleries.  SciCORPS, students start off volunteering at the lowest rung, and then graduate to a paid position of Museum Interpreter.  At the highest rung they learn to effectively administer the program.
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) / Minorities /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Students will become engaged in science; they will understand what a carreer in the STEM disciplines requires in prepration for college; they will go to college.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Students will become engaged with science; they will go to college; and many of them will have careers in the STEM disciplines.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The program is independently evaluated by Program Evaluation and Research Group which shows that the program is having an effect.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
A student who went through the program was the first student at her high school to go to Yale.
Description
The Peabody Museum's hosts yearly events for members, families, and the public.  Among those include:
Martin Luther King, Jr. Festival of Environmental Change. A free two-day event celebrating the life and legacy of Dr. King. 
¡Fiesta Latina! – A Celebration of Latin American Cultures. A free one-day event that includes music, dance, puppet shows and more.
A Peabody Halloween. Wear your costume to this safe, fun, and spooky event for families.
Dinosnore. Bring your tent and sleeping bag and spend the night in the Great Hall.
Talks and Lectures. Many talks and lectures throughout the year on all topics relating to natural history and culture.
Population Served General/Unspecified / Families /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
The visitorship of the Yale Peabody Museum will continue to increase, and there will be repeat visitors.  People will become engaged in the science and culture that the events programs strive to teach in a family-oriented and fun manner.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Families and other visitors will learn more about human culture and the science that results from the study of the Museum's rich collections.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Since the Events Program started, the numbers of individuals and families attending events has increased every year. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.  The Martin Luther King, Jr. Festival of Environmental Change event is the most well-attended MLK event in Connecticut.
Description
Permanent exhibitions include the Great Hall; Hall of Mammalian Evolution; Fossil Fragments: The Riddle of Human Origins; Hall of Native American Cultures; the Discovery Room; Torosaurus: A Peabody Dinosaur; Daily Life in Ancient Egypt; Birds of Connecticut; North American Dioramas; Southern New England Dioramas; Hall of Minerals, Earth, and Space among others.
At least twice a year the Peabody installs a temporary exhibition created by museum professionals. Past exhibitions have illuminated such topics as: Giant Squid; Dinosaur Eggs; the Burgess Shale; Black Holes; Elephants; Fly Fishing; Alien Earths; Disease Detectives. Current exhibition: Farmers, Warriors, Builders: The Hidden Life of Ants.  On display until January 2016: Samurai and the Culture of Japan's Great Peace.
 
Population Served Families / K-12 (5-19 years) / Adults
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Visitors will gain a greater understanding of earth's history through exhibitions on geology, the biological sciences, and anthropology.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Visitors will gain a greater understanding of earth's history through exhibitions on geology, the biological sciences, and anthropology.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Success is determined by the number of visitors every year, the number of school groups, the number of programs given to school groups.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
School groups visit both the permanent and temporary exhibitions because they relate to the CT state and local school standards.
Description

Overseen by a board of curators from the Yale University faculty, the exceptional collections of the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History are at the heart of University teaching, the interdisciplinary studies of researchers from around the world, and Museum exhibitions that communicate the importance and excitement of studying the earth’s history and diversity. There are more than 12 million specimens and objects held by the Museum’s 11 curatorial divisions, less than 1% of which can be displayed to the public at any given time.

The Yale Peabody Museum’s collections are available to legitimate researchers for scholarly use. Loans are issued to responsible individuals at established institutions. Loans and access to the collection can be arranged through the appropriate curatorial division.

Population Served / /
Program Comments
Foundation Comments
The programs listed are programs of the Peabody Museum.
CEO/Executive Director
Professor David Skelly
Term Start July 2014
Email peabody.director@yale.edu
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 51
Number of Part Time Staff 26
Number of Volunteers 250
Staff Retention Rate 94%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 77 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 0
Unspecified 77
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Jay Ague July 2008 - Dec 2008
Derek Briggs Jan 2009 - June 2014
Senior Staff
Title Director of Public Programs and Exhibitions
Title Director of Collections & Operations
Title Director, Finance & Administration
Title Director of External Relations
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
"Best Museum"New Haven Advocate Readers Choice Awards2011
"Best Museum"New Haven Advocate Readers Choice Awards2010
"Best Museum"New Haven Advocate Readers Choice Awards2009
"Best Museum"New Haven Advocate Readers Choice Awards2008
"Best Museum"New Haven Advocate Readers Choice Awards2007
"Best Museum"New Haven Advocate Readers Choice Awards2006
"Best Museum" every year sinceNew Haven Advocate Readers Choice Awards1993
Best MuseumNew Haven Advocate Readers Choice Award2012
Best MuseumNew Haven Advocate Readers Choice Award2013
"Best Museum" and "Best Exhibit"CT Now New Haven Readers' Poll Award2014
"Best Museum" and "Best Exhibit"CT Now New Haven Readers' Poll Award2015
Board Chair
David Skelly
Company Affiliation Director, Yale Peabody Museum
Term July 2014 to June 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Jay J. Ague Professor, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Curator of Mineralogy
Paola Bertucci Asst Professor, Dept. History of Science and Medicine; Curator of Historical Scientific Instruments
Bhart-Anjan S. Bhullar Assistant Professor, Department of History of Science and Medicine, Assistant Curator of Historical Scientific Instruments
Derek E. G. Briggs Professor, Department of Anthropology, Curator of Anthropology
Richard L. Burger Professor, Department of Anthropology, Curator of Anthropology
Leo W. Buss Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Curator of Invertebrate Zoology
Oswaldo F. Chinchilla Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Assistant Curator of Anthropology
Peter Crane Professor, Dean, Department of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Curator of Paleobotany
John Coleman Darnell Professor, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Curator of Anthropology
Michael J. Donoghue Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Curator of Botany (including Herbarium)
Michael R. Dove Professor, Department of Forestry & Environmental Sciences, Curator of Anthropology
Jacques A. Gauthier Professor, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology, Curator of Vertebrate Zoology
Pincelli M. Hull Assistant Professor, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Assistant Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology
Roderick J. McIntosh Professor, Department of Anthropology, Curator of Anthropology
Leonard E. Munstermann Research Scientist, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Curator of Entomology
Thomas J. Near Assistant Professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Assistant Curator of Vertebrate Zoology
Richard O. Prum Professor of Ornithology, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Curator of Vertebrate Zoology Ornithology)
Eric J. Sargis Professor, Department Anthropology, Curator of Vertebrate Zoology, Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology
Anne P. Underhill Professor, Department of Anthropology, Curator of Anthropology
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 17
Female 3
Unspecified 0
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $0.00
Projected Expenses $0.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Revenue$5,461,672,525$4,477,633,568$3,688,471,185
Total Expenses$3,513,798,862$3,423,617,239$3,318,422,271
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$473,848,529$420,916,242$363,390,660
Government Contributions$436,086,210$456,751,527$480,456,490
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$436,086,210$456,751,527$480,456,490
Individual Contributions$77,097$109,773$379,279
------
$1,614,941,369$1,463,978,643$1,347,807,723
Investment Income, Net of Losses$2,862,573,168$2,061,253,109$1,425,586,657
Membership Dues------
Special Events$299,427$332,273$198,971
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$73,846,725$74,292,001$70,651,405
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$3,173,142,279$3,063,983,158$2,949,430,543
Administration Expense$298,182,632$319,721,896$330,672,992
Fundraising Expense$42,473,951$39,912,185$38,318,736
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.551.311.11
Program Expense/Total Expenses90%89%89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue5%5%5%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$34,133,509,535$32,031,841,267$28,911,175,542
Current Assets$1,186,334,455$1,027,618,276$1,077,308,029
Long-Term Liabilities$6,993,977,756$6,474,409,047$6,520,896,609
Current Liabilities$457,163,417$436,779,980$452,997,300
Total Net Assets$26,682,368,362$25,120,652,240$21,937,281,633
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.592.352.38
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets20%20%23%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments
The Peabody Museum of Natural History operates under the 501c3 of Yale University. The 990s and audits contained in this profile are those for Yale University. The previous three years of financial information in the profile is specific to Yale University.
 
Yale University has a policy against sharing current fiscal year income and expense projections with the public so that information is blank in this profile.
 
This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

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