Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut
835 Main Street
Bridgeport CT 06604
Contact Information
Address 835 Main Street
Bridgeport, CT 06604-
Telephone (203) 382-0180 x13
Fax 203-696-2754
E-mail ja@jawct.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
Established in 1919, Junior Achievement (JA) is the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their future, and make smart academic and economic choices. JA programs are delivered by corporate and community volunteers, and provide relevant, hands-on experiences that give students from kindergarten through high school knowledge and skills in financial literacy, college/career readiness and entrepreneurship.  JA programs empower students to make a connection between what they learn in school and how it can be applied in the real world – enhancing the relevance of their classroom learning and increasing their understanding of the value of staying in school.

Established in 1947, Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut (JAWCT) currently works in partnership with over 1,000 community/corporate volunteers and educators providing empowering programs to over 22,000 students across 20 communities.  JA reaches 6 million students per year in 100 markets across the United States, with an additional six million students served by operations in 119 other countries worldwide.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1946
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Bernadine Venditto
Board Chair Mr. Craig Winslow
Board Chair Company Affiliation L. Catteron
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $811,100.00
Projected Expenses $892,652.00
Statements
Mission Established in 1919, Junior Achievement (JA) is the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their future, and make smart academic and economic choices. JA programs are delivered by corporate and community volunteers, and provide relevant, hands-on experiences that give students from kindergarten through high school knowledge and skills in financial literacy, college/career readiness and entrepreneurship.  JA programs empower students to make a connection between what they learn in school and how it can be applied in the real world – enhancing the relevance of their classroom learning and increasing their understanding of the value of staying in school.

Established in 1947, Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut (JAWCT) currently works in partnership with over 1,000 community/corporate volunteers and educators providing empowering programs to over 22,000 students across 20 communities.  JA reaches 6 million students per year in 100 markets across the United States, with an additional six million students served by operations in 119 other countries worldwide.

Background Nationally, JA was founded in 1919 by Theodore Vail, president of American Telephone & Telegraph, Horace Moses, president of Strathmore Paper Co., and Senator Murray Crane of Massachusetts. These three men sought to provide programs to help youth succeed in an economy rapidly shifting from an agricultural base to the industrial age. This dream was realized through JA's first program, entitled the Company Program, where students formed an actual company under the advisement of volunteers from business and industry. Over the past 90 years, JA has expanded its activities and broadened its scope. By continuing to use adult mentors from the business community to deliver programs and inspire students, JA now helps today's youth prepare for the opportunities and realities of work in the 21st century global marketplace. Each year, over 9 million K-12 students in 123 countries receive JA programs, which focus on three themes crucial to youth's economic and educational development: workforce readiness, financial literacy and entrepreneurship.

Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut (JAWCT) was founded in 1947 to fulfill that purpose. As it moves into its sixty-ninth year, JAWCT has improved educational outcomes for over 300,000 students in grades kindergartern through 12th, from all racial, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds in the twenty towns it serves.
Impact

Goals:

In alignment with strategic plan, continue student growth of 10% with a shift from elementary to middle and high school markets where there is the greatest need and potential for impact.

Launch a comprehensive marketing, alumni and fundraising campaign celebrating and bring recognition to its 70th year in business.

 
Accomplishments: 
New JA Launch Lesson - puts local entrepreneurs into classrooms to share what inspired them to start their own businesses and to open students’ minds to the entrepreneurial opportunities. Participating Schools: Shelton Intermediate, Bullard Havens Technical High School, Danbury High School, Fairfield Warde High School. In Shelton, Michaelangelo Guerra, owner Faccia Café and Catering in Shelton (and former JA student) and Larry Janesky, owner Basement Systems visited Shelton Intermediate School and shared their story with over 800 students, highlighting the opportunities, challenges, and preparation of starting your own business. 
 
JAWCT's three year strategic plan outlines student growth of 10%; including a shift from elementary to middle elementary school; a focus on underserved communities and an increase in middle and high school markets.  This target has been met one year ahead of plan to student distribution: 1% ahead for middle school and 4% ahead for high school.     
 
Earned JA USA’s highest national Five Star Award in recognition of JA staff and boards that meet national operational standards for compliance, student impact, operational efficiency, financial stability and sustainability.
During the 2015-2016 school year, Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut taught 22,658 students about business, jobs and the importance of education for success. 1,200 business and community volunteers provided JA programs to 20 Connecticut towns in the Greater Bridgeport, Lower Naugatucuk Valley and Greater Danbury service area resulting in:
  • Increased students' understanding of money, the world of work and the importance of education for a successful future
  • Increased mentoring relationships provided by caring adults in the community
  • New business and education partnerships that create a bridge between the classroom and the workplace.
  • Increased student awareness of local businesses, industries and career opportunities. 

Program accomplishments include:

-The 6th JA Titan High School Business Challenge, a web-based business simulation where students run a virtual company, was held in March 2016 at Sacred Heart University, a new venue. Participants from the top two teams each were awarded scholarships. Fourteen high schools participated, including Ansonia, Derby, Seymour and Shelton. Fifty area businesses sponsored the event. 
 
 
 
Needs
All programs are provided free of charge to schools and students. Each fiscal year we need to re-raise our organizational budget to deliver existing program and meet requests for program expansion. 
 
1. Volunteers to teach JA programs in grades K-12 in theGreater Bridgeport, Greater Danbury and Lower Naugatuck Valley communities.
2. Funding to support new and existing K-12 programs in the Greater Bridgeport, Greater Danbury and Lower Naugatuck communities.
CEO Statement
The past year was a successful one for Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut, donations were up, revenue and participation in our special events increased dramatically and once again we were recognized by Junior Achievement USA as one of its best local organizations in the U.S.
 
We served even more young people in Connecticut than in the previous year. In fact, 22,658 students participated in our financial education, career development and entrepreneurial programs.

JA of Western Connecticut’s vision is to be a premier organization, making a positive impact on the lives of all students in our franchised service area by developing habits for long term success and giving them a hand up for their future. 

Behind each one of these 22,000+ young people were many caring and generous adults who donated their time, energy, passion and financial resources.

 Members of our team included:

·         More than 1,000 volunteers from corporations and the community who invested countless hours of their time; 1,000 educators at 81 schools in 18 communities.

·         150 individuals, foundations and corporations who donated nearly $300,000 last year.

·         More than 1,000 friends of Junior Achievement who participated in special events that netted nearly $300,000.

·         23 members of our board of directors, along with 5 members of our Valley community board, 7 members of our Danbury community board and 8 members of our Bridgeport community boards who are deeply committed to the Junior Achievement mission.

·         The nine incredibly dedicated and hardworking members of JA’s staff.

These numbers underscore what helps to make Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut so effective – the powerful partnership between businesses, schools and the community, all focused on empowering students to own their own economic success. Thank you to each volunteer, educator, funder and community leader who invested time and resources in Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut. 

We invite you to support this remarkable effort which ensures a brighter future for each of our Junior Achievement students – and, as a result, for our community.
Board Chair Statement
It is my pleasure to serve as the Chairman of the Board of Directors for Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut.  I served as a member of the Board of Directors for five years before being appointed as the new Chairman.  I thoroughly enjoy teaching JA in the classroom and I am particularly pleased when students mention that they remember the JA class I taught in their school.
 
I am proud to see how Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut has grown and evolved to meet the needs of communities it serves and provide skills for the 21stcentury workplace. Though fundraising and allocation of funds are cornerstones of every Junior Achievement, we are also leaders in our region in bringing people together for the benefit of the community. Our volunteers are an incredible resource that fosters direct community involvement through volunteerism.  Additionally, the funds that we raise here in the community stay in that area unless a donor directs them to go elsewhere.Throughout my various experiences as a business executive, Board member and classroom volunteer, I am adamant that JA of Western CT’s core mission of “work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy,” is more critical now than ever! My goal as Board chair is to continue the great progress we have made in restructuring and building our Boards, strengthening our financial position, and ensuring that our programming is high quality and impactful, particularly in the middle schools and high schools.

I could go on and on about our numerous involvements in the community, but perhaps the best way to keep up with us would be to visit our website www.jawct.org.  We have a 70 year history of meeting the needs of the communities we serve and are excited about the future in positively impacting more young people.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Education / Educational Services
Secondary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development-Business
Areas Served
Derby
Seymour
Shelton
Ansonia
Other
JA of Western Connecticut has had a positive influence for students in the following communities: Bridgeport, Fairfield, Stratford, Trumbull, Bethel, Brookfield, Danbury, Monroe, New Fairfield, New Milford, Newtown, Wilton, Ansonia, Derby, Seymour, and Shelton improving educational outcomes for students from all racial, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds by providing empowering financial literacy, work readiness and entreprenurial programs for over 22,000 students in grades K-12.
Programs
Description
JA offers a distinct method of empowering youth to own their future economic success. The central theme found across JA’s research-based financial literacy, entrepreneurship and work readiness curriculum is that excellence in school leads to success in the real-world. All programs emphasize this school-to-career idea while teaching real-life concepts, such as ethical decision-making, opportunity costs, money management, career preparation and global competition while reinforcing important life skills, such as critical thinking, public speaking, teamwork, problem solving and budgeting. JA’s K-12 curriculum is organized into grade-specific elementary, middle and high school programs, and taught by local volunteers from the business community during the regular school day. These volunteers are recruited and trained by JA staff, and their time spent in the classroom is fundamental to our success; they lead activities while sharing their own life experiences, challenge students to think beyond their present circumstances, and reinforce basic skills crucial to succeeding in our modern economic system.
All JA programs are FREE to participating schools, volunteers and students. 
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Junior Achievement enhances the relevancy of education, bridging the gap between what students are learning in school and how it can be applied in the real world.
 
Program short term success includes:
-In a recent high school program evaluations 80% of JA students reported that JA helped them see the importance of school.
- Elementary school students who participate in JA possess more basic economics, personal finance, and business knowledge than non-JA students.
- Teachers (95%) and volunteers (92%) report that students who participate in JA have a better understanding of how the real world operates.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long term program success:
- JA alumni are using the 2010 Junior Achievement Alumni Retrospective Survey to build a solid foundation of financial security that will benefit the world economy. 
 - Research shows that JA has a positive and lasting impact on young people’s economic and career choices and ultimately success.
 - 92% stated that JA positively affected their future.
 - 88% stated JA helped prepare them for the world of work.
 - 84% indicated that JA enabled them to connect what they learned in the classroom to real life.
 - 88% report JA helped them build confidence to manage their personal finances.
 - Over 80% stated JA strengthened their problem solving, decision making, critical thinking and interpersonal communication skills.
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Upon completion of the project, JAWCT will evaluate the following:
 
Teacher and volunteer surveys solicited from every participant.
to evaluate qualitative results.
 
Pre- and post-tests administered to students to assess knowledge gain of key concepts and attitudinal changes.
 
Date of program completion, number of students and volunteers is verified by JAWCT President and registered with corporate headquarters, JA USA. 
 
Program results are reported to funding sources at the end of each program year, and more often if requested.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
JAWCT reaches nearly 70% of the student population in the city of Shelton. That is the highest participation rate in this region and among the highest participation rates in the state, in part due to the support of Pitney Bowes. JA has succeeded in bringing its programs to the remaining three Valley cities of Ansonia, Derby and Seymour. While maintaining its program impact in the Greater Bridgeport and Greater Danbury areas.

-At Seymour High School JA financial education classes were increased from two to eight classes as requested by the superintendent.

-Perry Hill Middle School received JA programming for the first time. Forty-three business volunteers from Pitney Bowes, Prudential, Perkin Elmer, Rexel Holding and Gexpro delivered the JA Program positively impacting 865 5th and 6th grade students with presentations by Mayor Lauretti and Superintendent Freeman Burr.

-Strengthen the Valley Community Board with new leadership and members:
Chair, Ruth Parkins, Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company and Vice Chair, Carla Sullivan, Valley Community Foundation; New member Albert Schneck, Wells Fargo Bank.
 
Additionally a testismonial from a Shelton teacher demonstrates JA programs are having a positive impact on our young people in the Valley area.
"Shelton Intermediate School has been involved in Junior
Achievement for many years. Junior Achievement of Western
Connecticut has helped us so that every year, 100% of our
students receive instruction from Junior Achievement volunteers
through our 'J.A. in 2 Days' program.  It has become a yearly
event at SIS.  The program compliments both our Social Studies
and our Business Education curricula and incorporates writing and
math skills as well.  The volunteers are so well-trained; it is
always a success and a great experience for our students."

Dina Marks
Shelton Intermediate School
Description
A generous multi-year grant  from The Valley Community Foundation  provides vital  financial literacy education and life skills programs for nearly 5,000 students in grades K-12 in the lower Naugatuck Valley communities during the 2017-2019 school years. 
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Junior Achievement enhances the relevancy of education, bridging the gap between what students are learning in school and how it can be applied in the real world.
 
Program short term success includes:
-In a recent high school program evaluations 80% of JA students reported that JA helped them see the importance of school.
- Elementary school students who participate in JA possess more basic economics, personal finance, and business knowledge than non-JA students.
- Teachers (95%) and volunteers (92%) report that students who participate in JA have a better understanding of how the real world operates.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long term program success:
- JA alumni are using the 2010 Junior Achievement Alumni Retrospective Survey to build a solid foundation of financial security that will benefit the world economy. 
 - Research shows that JA has a positive and lasting impact on young people’s economic and career choices and ultimately success.
 - 92% stated that JA positively affected their future.
 - 88% stated JA helped prepare them for the world of work.
 - 84% indicated that JA enabled them to connect what they learned in the classroom to real life.
 - 88% report JA helped them build confidence to manage their personal finances.
 - Over 80% stated JA strengthened their problem solving, decision making, critical thinking and interpersonal communication skills.
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Upon completion of the project, JAWCT will evaluate the following:
 
Teacher and volunteer surveys solicited from every participant.
to evaluate qualitative results.
 
Pre- and post-tests administered to students to assess knowledge gain of key concepts and attitudinal changes.
 
Date of program completion, number of students and volunteers is verified by JAWCT President and registered with corporate headquarters, JA USA. 
 
Program results are reported to funding sources at the end of each program year, and more often if requested.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
JAWCT reaches nearly 70% of the student population in the city of Shelton. That is the highest participation rate in this region and among the highest participation rates in the state, in part due to the support of Pitney Bowes. JA has succeeded in bringing its programs to the remaining three Valley cities of Ansonia, Derby and Seymour. While maintaining its program impact in the Greater Bridgeport and Greater Danbury areas.

-At Seymour High School JA financial education classes were increased from two to eight classes as requested by the superintendent.

-Perry Hill Middle School received JA programming for the first time. Forty-three business volunteers from Pitney Bowes, Prudential, Perkin Elmer, Rexel Holding and Gexpro delivered the JA Program positively impacting 865 5th and 6th grade students with presentations by Mayor Lauretti and Superintendent Freeman Burr.

-Strengthen the Valley Community Board with new leadership and members:
Chair, Ruth Parkins, Iroquois Pipeline Operating Company and Vice Chair, Carla Sullivan, Valley Community Foundation; New member Albert Schneck, Wells Fargo Bank.
 
Additionally a testismonial from a Shelton teacher demonstrates JA programs are having a positive impact on our young people in the Valley area.
"Shelton Intermediate School has been involved in Junior
Achievement for many years. Junior Achievement of Western
Connecticut has helped us so that every year, 100% of our
students receive instruction from Junior Achievement volunteers
through our 'J.A. in 2 Days' program.  It has become a yearly
event at SIS.  The program compliments both our Social Studies
and our Business Education curricula and incorporates writing and
math skills as well.  The volunteers are so well-trained; it is
always a success and a great experience for our students."

Dina Marks
Shelton Intermediate School
CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Bernadine Venditto
Term Start Mar 2008
Email bvenditto@jawct.org
Experience

Bernadine joined Junior Achievement of Western Connecticut in the fall of 2005 as a Program Manager and was promoted to President in July 2008. Under her leadership, the organization has achieved financial stability moving from operational deficits to consistent surpluses while, at the same time, each year increasing the number of students participating in JA programs by 10% and expanding program at the middle and high school levels. One of the new initiatives Bernadine has brought to the organization is the highly successful High School Business Challenge, a mission based fundraising event. Bernadine holds a B.A. in International Trade from Hofstra University.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 8
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 1200
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 80%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 9
Unspecified 0
Plans & Policies
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Date Strategic Plan Adopted June 2015
Management Succession Plan? Under Development
Organization Policy and Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Senior Staff
Title Director of Program
Experience/Biography xx
Title Vice President of Development
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Bi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Bi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Bi-Annually
Collaborations
 Junior Achievement of Western CT operates through collaborations with over 1,000 educators in 90 schools, 1,000 volunteers and corporate/ community partners.
Board Chair
Mr. Craig Winslow
Company Affiliation L. Catteron
Term July 2015 to June 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Cosmo Alberico Odyssey Logistics & Technology
Mr. Daniel Bley Webster Bank
Sherrie Casasanta Sikorsky Aircraft
Mr. James Cosgrove Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala
Mr. Adam Dworkin Griffin Hospital
Mr. Mark Ellis U.S. Trust
Mr. Leo Hansen retired
Mr. George Herring Community Volunteer
Mr. H. Michael Keden J.P. Morgan
Ms. Barbara Keegan Wells Fargo
Mr. George Logan Aquarion Water Company
Mr. Gaurav Manchanda Praxair
Mr. David Martin Western Connecticut State University
Robert Morris Pullman and Comley
Mr. Robert O'Connor People's United Bank
Mr. Philip Palmieri Integrated Print Solutions
Mr. Gary Rosato Fairfield Public Schools
Ms Tuvana Rua Sacred Heart University
Mr. Tom Santa Santa Fuel Inc.
Ms. Christina Selby
Mr. Brian Stevenson Pitney Bowes, Inc.
Ms. Kimberly Tabb Prudential
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 18
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 17
Female 5
Unspecified 1
Board Co-Chair
Mr. Adam Dworkin
Company Affiliation Griffin Faculty Practice Plan
Term July 2015 to June 2018
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Ms. Tara Barbieri CDW-G
Sandy Capellaro GE Capital
Mr. Eric Curry Webster Bank
Mr. Adam Dworkin Griffin Faculty Practice Plan, Inc
Ken Eng Cartus
Elizabeth Falk Pitney Bowes, Inc.
Peter Fazekas Aquarion Water Company
Robert Hendrick R.C. Bigelow,Inc.
Ms. Jacquelyn Kingsley Rexel Holdings USA
Ted Lefebvre Esq. Pullman & Comley, LLC
Ronald Nolting People's Securities Inc.
Ms. Lynn Padell Better Packages
Philip Pires Cohen & Wolf Attornies
Ms. Christine Scianna Hubbell
Christine Scianna Hubbell Wiring Systems
Aaron Smiles Matrix Realty Group
Mr. Thomas Swanson Peoples Bank
Kevin Toohill UBS Financial Services, Inc.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $811,100.00
Projected Expenses $892,652.00
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Additional IRS info.2013View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$506,525$499,142$358,501
Government Contributions$34,778$32,200$9,500
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$34,778$32,200$9,500
Individual Contributions------
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses$2,903$1,264$1,870
Membership Dues------
Special Events--$300,756$362,630
Revenue In-Kind$338,928----
Other$4,299$2,039$2,314
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$628,862$584,145$491,512
Administration Expense$143,728$106,376$96,391
Fundraising Expense$47,519$50,621$71,065
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.081.131.12
Program Expense/Total Expenses77%79%75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue9%6%10%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$613,626$547,209$436,447
Current Assets$276,717$356,585$356,233
Long-Term Liabilities$881$6,501--
Current Liabilities$79,411$74,698$64,329
Total Net Assets$533,334$466,010$372,118
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountWebster Bank $52,214Raymond P. Lavietes Foundation $50,000Raymond P. Lavietes Foundation $50,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountRaymond P. Lavietes Foundation $50,000Webster Bank NA $49,715Pitney Bowes $27,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountOdyssey Logistics & Technology $31,140JA Worldwide $40,000Valley Community Foundation $25,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities3.484.775.54
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%1%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments
  • In a recent Junior Achievement USA benchmark study comparing JAWCT to other JA areas of similar market size, performance and program delivery, JAWCT was above the national average in efficiency and productivity per full time employee equivalent. Organizational growth would indicate a need to secure additional resources to continue at this performance level.

  • Each fiscal year we need to re-raise all the funds necessary to provide existing program, including strengthening, stewarding current donor relationships and developing new donor partnerships. With lean staff resources, meeting those needs while growing our funding base is among our greatest challenges. 

  • Although we have a strong corporate and foundation donor retention rate, relying on this model leaves us vulnerable to changes in the economy, institutional priorities and a challenging fundraising environment.

  • According to The Osborne Group, an independent nonprofit consulting firm, “It is recommend that JAWCT begin to integrate individual giving more fully into its fundraising and diversify its fundraising base.” 

  • To increase our individual giving by a significant amount will require cultural and practical changes in the board, including seeing their role as a personal obligation rather than a corporate obligation. It will also require the examination of staff roles and additional resources.

Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 835 Main Street
Bridgeport, CT 06604
Primary Phone 203 382-0180 13
Contact Email ja@jawct.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Bernadine Venditto
Board Chair Mr. Craig Winslow
Board Chair Company Affiliation L. Catteron

 

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