True Colors
30 Arbor Street
suite 201a
Hartford CT 06106-0610
Contact Information
Address 30 Arbor Street
suite 201a
Hartford, CT 06106-0610
Telephone (860) 232-0050 x
Fax 860-232-0049
E-mail director@ourtruecolors.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
True Colors works to create a world where youth, adults and families of all sexual orientations and gender identities are valued and affirmed. We challenge all forms of oppression through education, training, advocacy, youth leadership development, mentoring and direct services to youth and those responsible for their well-being.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1998
Former Names
Children From the Shadows
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Robin P. McHaelen MSW
Board Chair Nicholas D'Agostino
Board Chair Company Affiliation Central CT State University
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $575,000.00
Projected Expenses $573,685.00
Statements
Mission True Colors works to create a world where youth, adults and families of all sexual orientations and gender identities are valued and affirmed. We challenge all forms of oppression through education, training, advocacy, youth leadership development, mentoring and direct services to youth and those responsible for their well-being.
Background
True Colors grew from an all volunteer run, field work project to a full fledged agency with a  $500,000 annual budget under the leadership of the current executive director, as well as wonderful volunteers and Board members.  True Colors uses 4 full time staff, one public ally apprentice, interns and volunteers to run our 5 programs: 
--Statewide mentoring and weekly social/support programming for LGBT youth in out-of-home care
-- youth leadership development and school based advocacy with middle, elementary and high schools across the state
-- professional cultural competency training with more than 2,400 participants each year;
-- our annual conference which is now the largest LGBT and ally conference in the country
--and the Safe Harbor Project which is a collaboration between True Colors and the State Department of Children and Families focusing on the needs of LGBT youth in out-of-home care.
Impact True Colors has changed the landscape for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer and questioning youth across Connecticut.  We have provided cultural competency training to more than 17,000 youth serving professionals including social workers, educators, and clinicians. We offer Connecticut's only LGBTQI  youth mentoring program, recruit foster parents for youth in out-of-home care, provide school based advocacy and offer the largest LGBTQIA youth conference in the country every March.
Needs
  • General Operating Expenses (grants often cover program expenses - but we still have to pay the rent and turn the lights on - not very sexy but incredibly important. Cost = Any amount!)
  • Youth Conference Scholarships: because inclusion is important to us, we keep youth rates low -- in fact, the costs of youth participation in the conference are more than twice what we charge them to participate - and we waive fees, lower fees and offer scholarships to ensure that every youth who wants to participate, can - whether they have the resources or not. That results in about a $40,000 deficit each year that we work to make up in co-sponsorships, donations, and scholarships.  This year, the deficit is likely to be higher because of budget crises is affecting agency's ability to off-set their staff registrations. $75 - $150
  • Tickets to interesting activities for the mentoring program - much of what the mentoring program does is help youth build connections and memories  - activities such as live theater, museum tickets, skating, etc. offer mentor/mentee pairs the opportunity to build their relationships $50 - $150
  • A volunteer coordinator - we are working to raise the funds to hire a full time volunteer coordinator to help us better serve our youth with recruited, trained, and supervised volunteers
CEO Statement
True Colors is the ONLY organization in CT solely dedicated to the needs of LGBT youth and their families - at home, at school, in the community and within the child welfare arena.  Our passionate and dedicated cadre of staff and volunteers touch thousands of lives each year - both directly through our mentoring and youth leadership programs and indirectly through our advocacy, policy and training work.
 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Secondary Organization Category Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy / Civil Rights, Social Action, & Advocacy N.E.C.
Tertiary Organization Category Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy / Lesbian/Gay Rights
Areas Served
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
True Colors, Inc. is a statewide agency serving all of Connecticut. In addition, we have had a national impact through our training and consulation programs
Programs
Description

True Colors offers CT's only mentoring program for LGBT youth. We match LGBT youth in out-of-home care (foster care, group homes, shelters, etc) with adult mentors who spend 1-3 hours a week with them. In addition, we offer 4 -5 monthly group activities to provide LGBT youth with the chance to socialize with other LGBT youth. We currently have just over 125 youth in the program

Population Served Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Youth have demonstrated (through pre and post program testing):
  • improved social skills
  • Reduced behavioral issues
  • Increased satisfaction with their overall quality of life
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Launched in 2003 specifically to meet the un-met needs of LGBT youth, we are now the Department of Children and Family's largest mentoring provider.  Dozens of our matches have been maintained long term (3 or more years); many of our youth have gone onto college or other secondary education.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
CT State Department of Children and Families
United Way of the Capital Area
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. S* was in 17 different placements before she was referred to True Colors. We matched her with a wonderful mentor, who not long after became her foster parent. S* stayed with her mentor for more than 18 months (her longest placement ever) until she graduated and went on to college.
Description Now in its seventeenth year, the True Colors annual conference is the largest LGBT youth issues conference in America. More than 2,500 LGBT and ally youth, educators, social workers, clinicians, health care providers, family members and clergy come together each year to participate in workshops, activities, and programs that celebrate, educate and advocate for the interests of LGBT youth and their families
Population Served Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered / At-Risk Populations / General/Unspecified
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals No
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
  • educators, social workers and youth learn new skills which they can take back to their classrooms and communities. 
  • Youth feel included, affirmed
  • Our range of workshops is comprehensive -- offering skill building fand developing cultural competency skills for both those who are new to the work and those who have been working with this population for years
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Literally thousands of  LGBT and ally youth have come through our doors over the last 17 years. Feedback, testimonials, letters of thanks pour in after each event and many use words like, "You literally saved my life!" "My best day ever!" "First time I ever felt like I belonged".
 
When we began working with LGBT youth in 1994, there were 4 Gay/Straight Alliances across CT - now there are more than 150 - and we had a hand in most of them!
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Workshop committee made up of staff and youth/adult volunteers who review both overall conference and individual workshop evaluations
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Jen started with True Colors in 1994 as one of the youngest out lesbian students in Connecticut.  Already living largely on her own as a 16 year old, she found a new family within the ranks of our youth and adult volunteers. Over the next 17 years, she graduated from high school, grew from entry level to division manager at a national retail chain - and is still the overall volunteer coordinator for the conference., managing more than 160 volunteers during the event! 
 
 
Description
Youth Leadership Development:  this program focuses on the needs of LGBT and ally youth at school. We provide an on-site, six week Activist Institute, which gives youth the skills to advocate for themselves and others. In addition, we partner with schools and other organizations to offer Gay/Straight Alliance Summits which brings together youth from a regional area. Finally, we provide direct advocacy and intervention with youth experiencing harassment on the basis of actual or perceived orientation or gender
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Students identify and implement specific change projects in their schools. In the 2011/2012 school year, for example, student projects included:

·        1 school created a mural of LGBT support

·        1 school co-sponsored the Laramie Project and fund-raised to bring students to the True Colors conference

·        4 schools planned assemblies to combat anti-LGBT bullying

·        3 schools wrote public service announcements and speeches on anti-LGBT bullying to be presented on Day of Silence

·        1 school designed a senior elective course on sexism and homophobia

·        1 school created an online resource for LGBT students

·        1 school put together personal narratives on experiences with anti-LGBT bullying to present to administration

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. It is our hope that the program will impact both youth and their communities in positive ways. First, youth develop self-efficacy and confidence. In addition, as their skills develop, youth develop a stronger sense of their personal responsibility to be as well as their ability to be productive citizens. In addition, the projects that youth take on are designed to impact the schools and communities they are part of, especially this year, with our renewed focus on systemic change. For example, if a student group creates – and gets approved -- a policy about gender neutral bathrooms, students in future years will continue to reap the benefits of that greater inclusivity. Or perhaps students might decide to work with their school culture officer (a position required by statute for the first time this school year) to get questions about orientation and gender onto the school climate survey – again, the information can be used to inform policies and practices that impact students for years to come.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Our ‘measurable outcomes’ include 8-12 Activist Institutes serving 80 – 120 high school students; the production (or co-sponsoring of) 3 regional summits serving 75- 150 youth and adult advisors in different parts of the state; the completion of a middle school community needs assessment via school based surveys and a community conversation about the needs of these youth; the creation of 2-5 new programs targeting LGBT youth at the middle school as determined by the outcomes of a needs analysis survey

·        Additional definitions of success include: 95% of satisfaction surveys with youth participants rate their experiences as good, very good or excellent; 95% of satisfaction surveys with adult participants rate the impact of the program on student engagement and skills as significant; and a minimum of 80% of the student groups that participate in the Activist Institute choose and implement a change project that results in lasting change

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Positive outcomes of Activist Institute were reflected in the enthusiasm, creativity, and ambition of some of the change projects GSA students came up with. In terms of the students we served, many of them developed leadership skills in tangible ways. For instance, one student who had suffered years of bullying due to his gender presentation was able to spearhead his school’s change project and turn some of his personal frustration into positive change. He came up with an idea for an LGBT-themed mural for his school, rallied together student support, and got his GSA advisor and art teacher to help him distribute resources for the project. The students at this particular school are now working on their mural, which will be displayed at the start of the fall 2012 school year.

Students in other schools have followed similar paths – having either experienced anti-gay bullying or witnessed the situations of their LGBT peers, they have really recognized an opportunity to stand up, assert themselves, and combat homophobia and cissexism in their communities. Overwhelmingly, many students seemed to feel equipped to educate their peers on LGBT issues despite the threat of backlash and disapproval. Through developing their change projects, GSA members learned how to converse eloquently on the subject of sexual orientation and gender identity. They learned to explain to others that sexual orientation is not a “choice” that can be “cured” through conversion therapy or forced heterosexuality. They learned the crucial difference between gender identity and sexual orientation, and how to effectively communicate that concept to others. They learned about taking a stand and defending their points and the difficulty of combating ignorance.
Description
The Safe Harbor Program is a collaboration between True Colors and DCF. We run a statewide task force; provide recommendations regarding policy and programming; recruit foster parents for adolescents of all orientations and gender; train DCF and provider staff; and provide consultation services to staff and providers regarding specific youth and/or their families
Population Served Adults / Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Short term successes have included finding affirming homes for specific youth within the system, the development of inclusive policies and advocacy on behalf of specific youth or families. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Our primary goal is to improve the quality of life for LGBT youth in out-of-home care, to connect them to community and when possible to re-connect them with biological and/or chosen families or kinship networks. We work to ensure that they are safe, valued and affirmed through culturally competent programs, policies and practices. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Quarterly reports to and oversight by DCF
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.  DCF was the first state agency to include gender identity and expression in its non-discrimination policies - years before the state statutes required it!
Description
True Colors trains more than 2,400 helping professionals across CT and nationally each year. Our curriculum has been adopted as a model curriclum by the Child Welfare League of America, the National Association of Social Workers and Lambda Legal Education and Defense Fund.
Population Served Adults / Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Lesbian, Gays, Bisexuals, Transgendered
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
In the short term, provider awareness and understanding is increased; participants are successfully able to differentiate between their personal views, beliefs and values and their professional responsibilities and their interactions with youth are more inclusive of the needs and concerns of LGBT youth.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long term goals of this program include improving the overall quality of life for LGBT youth at home, at school, in the community and in out-of-home care.  We work to ensure that those responsible for the health and well-being of young people have the sensitivity, skills and understanding to effectively work with this population.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success is monitored via pre and post surveys regarding knowledge base and degree of comfort as well as workshop evaluations
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Participant feedback has been uniforming outstanding! More than 90 % of participants rate the program as excellent or very good;
Examples of recent comments include:
--Thanks very much for teaching my class, Human Behavior in the Social Environment,.  The students valued learning with you!  They found your teaching approach "awesome" and found the information, ideas, and perspectives important to their professional development. Students were especially impressed by the dangers faced by LGBTQI youth in coming out.  They hope to create a more intentionally welcoming, affirming, and inclusive environment for families and children in their future practice.

--Thank you for your terrific session on Talking to GLBT Youth at the 8th Annual Yale Pediatric Update CME Course. I really appreciate the amount of thought, and time, you put into preparing and presenting the material. I am tremendously grateful to you for having helped make the day such a success. I heard many attendees saying great things about your talk.


Program Comments
CEO Comments
Our programs literally save lives - and we have the testimonials from youth, social workers and teachers to back that statement up! 
 
One significant challenge that we face is that schools in particular rarely have the funds to support cultural competency training targeting smaller populations. As a result, although they know they need training (especially in the elementary and middle school arenas), they rarely have the funds. The demand is high, our resources are limited and we too often have to choose to train those who can afford it rather than those who really need it... Even so, we provide dozens of pro-bono workshops each year.  We would love to be able to offer comprehensive training at no charge or reduced rates if we could identify a funding source to supplement the costs.
CEO/Executive Director
Robin P. McHaelen MSW
Term Start Sept 1998
Email director@ourtruecolors.org
Experience

Robin P. McHaelen, MSWis the founder and current Executive Director of True Colors, Inc. She is the co-author of A Sexuality and Gender Diversity Training Program: Increasing the Competency of Mental Health Professionals(2011, Professional Resource Press, FL) as well as Recommended Practices to Promote the Safety and Well-Being of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning (LGBTQ) Youth and Youth at Risk of or Living with HIV in Child Welfare Settings (2012, Lambda Legal) and several other articles on LGBT youth concerns. Robin is the recipient of numerous awards including the 2011 University of Connecticut, Provost’s Award for Excellence in Public Engagement; the 2009 Hartford Courant/Fox 61 Tapestry Award, the 2008 National Education Association’s Virginia Uribe Award for Creative Leadership in Human Rights and the 2008 Social Worker of the Year (National Association of Social Workers, CT Chapter). 

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 150
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director, Mentoring Program
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Quarterly
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Quarterly
Collaborations
We collaborate with LifeWorks in California, the only other LGBT youth-in-out-of-home care mentoring program. We are part of the SAFE Schools collaboration that includes the Connecticut Chapter of the Gay, Lesbian, Straight, Education Network (GLSEN), the Anti-Defamation League; and the Governor’s Prevention Partnership providing school climate training. We are members of a School Climate Task Force managed by the State Department of Education. We work with GLSEN on joint school based initiatives. We work with the Anti-Discrimination Coalition which successfully helped get gender identity and expression added to Connecticut’s Civil Rights Statutes. We are co-founders of the Connecticut Coalition of LGBT Concerns, a broad based coalition which meets periodically to work on common initiatives. We collaborate with the HGLHC to provide joint youth programming each year, including Queer Prom and an annual Halloween dance for LGBT and ally youth. In addition, we represent LGBT youth concerns on various prevention task forces including youth suicide prevention, intimate partner violence prevention, and the healthy teens coalition. We also work with the Hartford Conference of Churches to provide Entrepreneurial training for youth in greater Hartford.
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
One Woman Makes a DifferenceCT Women's Education and Legal Fund1999
Virginia Uribe Award for Civil Rights LeadershipNational Education Association2008
Social Worker of the YearNational Association of Social Workers, CT Chapter2008
Gender Equity Achievement of the YearNational Association of Multi-Cultural Education2006
Martin Luther King Day HonoreeYale School of Nursing2003
Provost's Award for Excellence in Outreach and Public EngagementUniversity of CT2011
Tapestry AwardHartford Courant/Fox 612010
Board Chair
Nicholas D'Agostino
Company Affiliation Central CT State University
Term June 2013 to June 2014
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
James Eckerle Retired
Elena Gervino VP, the Travelers
Nina Simone Lawrence Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation
Mark Pappalardo Bank of America
Jimmy Tickey Friends of Rosa Delauro, Campaign Manager
Tyrone Walker United Technologies
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 5
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 5
Governance
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Directors and Officers Policy
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Medical Health Insurance
Professional Liability
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Standing Committees
Board Governance
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Finance
Executive
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
CEO Comments
True Colors has a relatively small working board. Since the creation of our first comprehensive strategic plan in 2009, they have been working diligently to complete the objectives related to governance (which are largely completed); board evaluation and selection (in process) and board development.  Fund development (especially in the area of individual donor and major gift development) continues to be a challenge. 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2013
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2013
Projected Revenue $575,000.00
Projected Expenses $573,685.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902012
Form 9902011
Form 9902010
Form 9902009
IRS Letter of Exemption
501c3
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
True Colors Annual Report2011View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201220112010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$182,484$227,058$140,261
Government Contributions$157,397$153,261$186,431
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$157,397$153,261$186,431
Individual Contributions------
------
$119,980$101,698$98,591
Investment Income, Net of Losses$142$310$1,067
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$5,011$20,421$16,201
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Program Expense$448,406$440,141$380,876
Administration Expense$34,151$28,874$43,248
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.961.071.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses93%94%90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Total Assets$266,970$283,099$234,723
Current Assets$258,482$274,038$224,603
Long-Term Liabilities$15,272$11,233$8,038
Current Liabilities$13,821$16,446$4,998
Total Net Assets$237,877$255,420$221,687
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201220112010
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDCF $157,397DCF $153,261DCF $156,432
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountHartford Foundation for Public Giving $90,000Hartford Foundation for Public Giving $84,000Hartford Foundation for Public Giving $55,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountUnited Way $15,337Perrin Family Foundation $20,000United Way $15,950
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities18.7016.6644.94
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets6%4%3%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments
We expect to end  at essentially a break-even point.  In addition, we have $104,000 in short term and accessibly CDs, which represents about a 3 month cash reserve.  We are in the process of raising funds to support a full-time volunteer coordinator. As we analysed our progress on the goals of our strategic plan, it became clear that we need additional resources to reach those goals. We know that we need to grow our organizational skills in three areas:  individual donor development and relationship building; more effective recruitment, integration and supervision of volunteers in that arena; and increased community awareness of our work.  We have completed Step One in our process to grow in these areas with an analysis of our current job responsibilities to identify service responsibilities that we can shift from the ED and to whom? Since long term funding of that position will be reliant on donor development, we are also working to identify grants to temporarily support the position  while we work to grow the funding streams.
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 30 Arbor Street
suite 201a
Hartford, CT 061060610
Primary Phone 860 232-0050
CEO/Executive Director Robin P. McHaelen MSW
Board Chair Nicholas D'Agostino
Board Chair Company Affiliation Central CT State University

 

Related Information

Promote Civic Vitality

Greater New Haven’s vibrancy is linked to its communities’ support of its neighborhoods, public gardens and sports, as well as its commitment to the protection of its people and pets.