Connecticut Association for Human Services
237 Hamilton Street
Suite 208
Hartford CT 06106
Contact Information
Address 237 Hamilton Street
Suite 208
Hartford, CT 06106-
Telephone (860) 951-2212 x
Fax 860-951-6511
E-mail info@cahs.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The Connecticut Association for Human Services improves opportunity and prosperity for Connecticut’s children and families by shaping policies and programs that significantly and measurably reduce poverty and promote a secure future.  We are inspired by a belief in shared prosperity and the vision of a Connecticut where all children and families thrive and, regardless of income level, contribute to and share in Connecticut’s growth. 

Founded in 1910, CAHS is a nonprofit organization committed to ending poverty in Connecticut. In order to achieve our mission, CAHS works hand-in-hand with advocates, service providers, private citizens, businesses, labor, policymakers, and government agencies. CAHS has taken the lead statewide in promoting family economic security policies and strategies that empower low-income working families to achieve financial stability, including improved access to basic needs, development of a system of quality early care and education, and effective investments in post-secondary education and job training. Through our efforts, we are able to assist providers and community leaders in linking lower-income residents to existing support programs and services.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1978
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Charity Type I Supporting Organization
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. James P. Horan
Board Chair Mr. Casey McGuane
Board Chair Company Affiliation CEO, BankMobile
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $1,523,315.00
Projected Expenses $1,521,056.00
Statements
Mission

The Connecticut Association for Human Services improves opportunity and prosperity for Connecticut’s children and families by shaping policies and programs that significantly and measurably reduce poverty and promote a secure future.  We are inspired by a belief in shared prosperity and the vision of a Connecticut where all children and families thrive and, regardless of income level, contribute to and share in Connecticut’s growth. 

Founded in 1910, CAHS is a nonprofit organization committed to ending poverty in Connecticut. In order to achieve our mission, CAHS works hand-in-hand with advocates, service providers, private citizens, businesses, labor, policymakers, and government agencies. CAHS has taken the lead statewide in promoting family economic security policies and strategies that empower low-income working families to achieve financial stability, including improved access to basic needs, development of a system of quality early care and education, and effective investments in post-secondary education and job training. Through our efforts, we are able to assist providers and community leaders in linking lower-income residents to existing support programs and services.

Background

CAHS was founded in 1910 as a volunteer organization that held annual conferences to discuss philosophies and innovations in the field of social work. Our vision over the past century has remained steadfast: a Connecticut where all children and families thrive, regardless of income, and contribute to and share in the state’s growth. CAHS is helping to build a Connecticut where low-income residents work with government, business, labor and faith leaders in developing policies and programs that ensure the state’s prosperity, as well as their own.

CAHS promotes economic security strategies that empower low-income working families to achieve financial independence. CAHS works to reduce poverty and build family economic success (FES) through outreach, education, and policy work. We inform service providers and others to advocate for policy and practice changes that move low- to moderate-income (LMI) families toward prosperity. Most efforts are directed at families under 130 percent of the federal poverty level and all at families under 200 percent of the federal poverty level.

CAHS champions important issues by:

  • Promoting collaboration among ongoing initiatives to help end poverty in Connecticut.
  • Creating a supportive cross-sector network for policies and practices that ensure family economic stability.
  • Connecting to the state’s plans for strengthening its workforce, recharging its economy and reducing child poverty.
  • Building new leadership across sectors to achieve these goals – a broad partnership that includes families, community leaders, nonprofit social services providers and advocates, government, business, labor, faith-based groups and policymakers.
  • Developing and strengthening policies and programs to move families out of poverty and prevent families from falling into poverty by providing universal access to supports and opportunities for low- to middle-income families.

 

A key strength of CAHS is our ability to collaborate with others. We bring together diverse interests – concerned citizens, policy makers, human service providers, corporate leaders, labor leaders, academics, state and municipal organizations, and religious organizations.

 

Across CAHS' various outreach program areas, over 28,000 (directly and indirectly) low- to moderate-income Connecticut residents receive assistance with tax preparation, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP-formerly food stamps) applications, and opportunities to improve financial literacy.

 

CAHS has been a statewide leader in SNAP and nutrition program outreach for over 15 years. In that time, we have gained a good sense of the most effective methods of connecting lower-income people to the programs for which they qualify. In 2010, 14,000 people were pre-screened for food stamps or received application information, thanks to CAHS staff involvement. This includes the 3,000 households that were screened for several benefits through the Access Benefits (now known as EarnBenefits Online) program.
Impact

At CAHS, we are proud of our recent accomplishments:

Volunteer Income Tax Assitance:  In 2016, CAHS expanded outreach through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program. In 2016, trained VITA volunteers in New Haven prepared almost 4,700 tax returns, returning $9.1 million in state and federal refunds to local families including $2.5 million in federal Earned Income Tax Credits (EITC) which may have otherwise gone unclaimed.
 
Financial education: Since 2009, the Connecticut Money School (CMS) has provided free financial education targeted to low- and moderate-income adults. With over 4,500 students served to date, CAHS has hosted this program in over 70 locations statewide.  CMS now includes Spanish and online versions. CAHS also has a Youth Money School, which offers financial education for teens and young adults, including workshops on budgeting, credit, and paying for college.

State and federal policy advocacy: CAHS has a significant presence and impact in advocacy roles, at both the state and federal levels, as leaders of the Family Economic Success (FES) Network. In 2012, CAHS led the statewide coalition advocating for the adoption of the state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). CAHS produces and disseminates policy briefs and reports regarding policies impacting family economic success, including early care and education, access to higher education, and access to benefits, among others. CAHS has found success in the passage of the statewide two-generation initiative. To support CAHS’ program and policy work, KIDS COUNT and the Working Poor Families Project produce data and policy briefs on topics such as developmental education.

Needs

Volunteers are needed throughout the state and are trained and supported throughout their work:

  • Connecticut Money School (CMS) – Volunteer instructors prepare and deliver classroom instruction for up to 30 participants. Topics range from Basic Budgeting to Saving for College. For more information, visit www.ctmoney.org.
  • Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) – Volunteers are trained as tax preparers or serve as greeters or intake specialists. VITA sites are located in Bridgeport, Danbury, Derby, Meriden, Naugatuck, New Haven, Norwalk, Shelton, Stratford, Waterbury and other locations throughout the state. 
Financial support is always needed to expand the delivery of services from basic needs outreach to our financial education and empowerment programs. 
 
Partner organizations are critical to CAHS’s success. We operate with local governments, non-profit agencies, businesses and state agencies throughout the state to administer programs, build coalitions, and increase the coordination and impact of our work. We continually seek additional partners and advocates.

For more information about these needs, or if you would like to partner with CAHS, please call our office at 860-951-2212.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Alliances & Advocacy
Secondary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Food Programs
Tertiary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
CAHS serves the state of Connecticut with concentrations in Hartford, New Haven, Waterbury, and Fairfield County.
Programs
Description

The Connecticut Money School (CMS)  provides free financial education for adults and seniors  We believe that everyone should have the opportunity to become financially independent. We ensure that students receive a high standard of financial education that will help them work towards a prosperous future.

 

CMS is a community-based initiative created to promote economic stability for low to moderate income adults and seniors in Connecticut.  Nearly 100 instructors with financial backgrounds teach our classes. Topics covered include: debt, savings, basic budgeting, credit, loans, health care, homeownership, saving for college, and senior issues (long-term care, retirement, fraud prevention).  We have recently added a Spanish language and online version, covering a broad range of topics.
 
CAHS also operates the Youth Money School, which offers financial education for teens and young adults, including workshops on budgeting, credit and paying for college. 

 

Population Served Adults / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. In the past year, 740 adults received services through CMS and 500 youths received services through the Youth Money School via a network of 40 active volunteers.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Pre- and post-tests. 
Description For hundreds of thousands of workers in Connecticut, even a full-time job does not pay enough to allow them to make ends meet and achieve self-sufficiency.  Public benefits and work supports can supplement household income earned from wages.  Eligible individuals and families often do not take advantage of such benefits because they are unaware of them, wrongly believe that they are not eligible if employed, or the feel it is a “hassle” to enroll. 

 

CAHS is addressing these urgent needs by replacing our previous benefits program, Access Benefits Online, with a new program EarnBenefits Online (EBO). EBO is an easy-to-use, web-based system that allows individuals to be screened for eligibility for sixteen public benefits programs. EBO is already being utilized in other states, including Georgia, Maryland, New York, and Tennessee. The easy screening process involves a client answering fourteen questions from an agency staff person. The EBO software program then produces a list of benefits the client is eligible for, clear instructions on what paperwork is needed, and fills out relevant forms. EBO expedites the process of applying for benefits and helps to eliminate the barriers that hinder individuals' and families' access to needed benefits.

 

 
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Screened close to 3000 individuals in the first year of the Access Benefits Program. EBO is still new and partnerships are still forming.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Data exchange agreement with Department of Social Services
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Enrolled 1041 households in benefits in 2011 through the Access Benefits Online Program. The Earn Benefits Online Program is still in its infancy, but partnerships with provider organizations have begun to be formed.
Description

Since 2004 CAHS has organized coalitions of VITA sites across the state.  VITA programs provide alternatives to paid and predatory tax preparation in low-income communities. According to IRS data, in 2003 nearly 57% of Refund Anticipation Loan (RAL) recipients were also recipients of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). A RAL is a short-term high-interest loan offered by some commercial tax preparers that allow people to borrow the amount of their refund before they receive it. In 2003, the IRS estimated that EITC recipients nationally paid $740 million dollars in application, administrative, and loan fees. In addition to paying high fees for tax preparation, the IRS estimates that 20% of those eligible for the EITC do not take advantage of it, leaving millions of dollars in unclaimed credits each year. VITA sites ensure that residents have access to a free tax service that will screen for refunds and tax credits, without offering high interest loans or administrative fees. This service keeps refunds and credits in the hands of low and moderate-income families, and in their communities.

Population Served Families / Adults / Elderly and/or Disabled
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. In the 2016 tax season, volunteers in New Haven prepared almost 4,700 tax returns, returning $9.1 million in state and federal refunds to local families including $2.5 million in federal Earned Income Tax Credits (EITC
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. IRS and internal program metrics
Description CAHS operated the Annie E. Casey Foundation Kids Count project in Connecticut.  Kids Count is a public education and advocacy campaign that provides reliable, comprehensive, timely data and analysis on how well Connecticut’s children are doing at the state and local levels.

Kids Count is known for its positive influence on decision-making and its success in moving important issues into the public arena. By linking data with sound policy analysis, Kids Count makes the case that social, economic, education, and health policies can’t be developed and implemented in isolation, as they have far-reaching effects on the lives of all children across the state. Our analyses demonstrate to policymakers and the public that in order to maintain a healthy Connecticut, we must work to improve family well-being as much as we work to improve the state’s economic well-being.

Kids Count produces a number of publications, including a biennial data book and annual policy briefs and reports that explain the real-life implications of policymakers’ decisions on children and families. Our publications focus on topics about family economic security, health, education, safety, economic development, and workforce education and skill development. 
Population Served / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
CEO/Executive Director
Mr. James P. Horan
Term Start Nov 2001
Email jhoran@cahs.org
Co-CEO
N/A
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 9
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 200
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 81%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 0
Unspecified 10
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Comments
CEO Comments
 
 
Board Chair
Mr. Casey McGuane
Company Affiliation CEO, BankMobile
Term June 2014 to June 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Ms. Denise Berryhill Davis
Ms. Karen Debois-Walton Ph.D
Mr. Chris Duffy
Mr. Jim Eckerle
Ms. Mary Kay Fenton
Mr. Walter Gilliam Ph.D.Yale Child Study Center
Ms. Merle W. Harris Charter Oak State College, Retired
Mr. Jamal Jimerson
Mr. Curtis Law Norwalk Housing Authority
Ms. Lily Lopez Citi Community Development
Ms. Cynthia McKenna Catholic Charities, Archdiocese of Hartford
Ms. Elsa Nunez Ph.DEastern Connecticut State University
Ms. Tanya Rhodes Smith
Mr. Todd Zeidenberg CLU,ChFC,CLTCSecurian Financial
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Blanket Personal Property
Boiler and Machinery
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Commercial General Liability and Medical Malpractice
Computer Equipment and Software
Crime Coverage
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
General Property Coverage
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Professional Liability
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Board Co-Chair
N/A
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Nominating
Program / Program Planning
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $1,523,315.00
Projected Expenses $1,521,056.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902015
Form 9902014
Form 9902013
Form 9902012
Form 9902011
Form 9902010
Form 9902009
IRS Letter of Exemption
501c3 letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,477,522$1,275,594$1,626,017
Government Contributions$0$268,221$184,846
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified--$268,221$184,846
Individual Contributions------
--$81,268--
$99,609--$49,545
Investment Income, Net of Losses$1$16$138
Membership Dues$10,225$9,535$15,695
Special Events$11,747----
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$336----
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$1,302,741$1,390,419$2,076,299
Administration Expense$122,115$149,284$121,266
Fundraising Expense$58,406--$95,338
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.081.060.82
Program Expense/Total Expenses88%90%91%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue4%0%5%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$1,382,219$1,389,005$1,059,114
Current Assets$598,463$512,094$243,054
Long-Term Liabilities$809,942$1,130,531$869,010
Current Liabilities$203,772$15,147$35,286
Total Net Assets$368,505$252,327$154,818
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountWilliam C. Graustein Memorial Fund $400,000 --Annie E. Casey Foundation $382,500
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountAnnie E. Casey Foundation $280,018 --William Casper Graustein Memorial Fund $302,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountBureau of Rehabilitation Services $133,210 --DSS $152,704
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.9433.816.89
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets59%81%82%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 237 Hamilton Street
Suite 208
Hartford, CT 06106
Primary Phone 860 951-2212
Contact Email info@cahs.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. James P. Horan
Board Chair Mr. Casey McGuane
Board Chair Company Affiliation CEO, BankMobile

 

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