Children's Law Center of Connecticut
30 Arbor Street
Hartford CT 06106
Contact Information
Address 30 Arbor Street
Hartford, CT 06106-
Telephone (860) 232-9993 x
Fax 860-232-9996
E-mail clc@clcct.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
Our mission is to protect impoverished children in family court and advocate for systemic changes to the adversarial system and other policies that advance the well-being of children involved in family transitions. Through our programs and services, we strive to create safe, stable environments for children whose parents are in chronic conflict.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1994
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Atty. Justine Rakich-Kelly
Board Chair Atty. Robert Madden
Board Chair Company Affiliation University of St. Joseph
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $1,124,367.00
Projected Expenses $1,114,367.00
Statements
Mission
Our mission is to protect impoverished children in family court and advocate for systemic changes to the adversarial system and other policies that advance the well-being of children involved in family transitions. Through our programs and services, we strive to create safe, stable environments for children whose parents are in chronic conflict.
Background

In November 1992, six year-old Ayla Rose was shot and killed by her father during a court ordered supervised visitation, after a violent argument with Ayla’s mother. From this tragedy arose a coalition of concerned professionals and parents, united to examine how our legal system failed this little girl. Ultimately, the need was identified for children to have a legal advocate of their own in their parents’ high conflict family court cases. Twenty three years later, CLC has grown to a staff of twelve, a budget of $1.1 million, and operates in twelve of Connecticut’s 13 judicial districts with plans underway to be statewide by the end of 2016 with the inclusion of the Danbury jurisdiction. In 2015, the organization served 2,368 children and families through its programs and services. Today we remain the only organization in Connecticut with this unique mission and have become a national model of excellence.

The Children’s Law Center (CLC) strives to create safe, stable environments for indigent children whose parents are in chronic conflict. Our primary goal is to be the voice for children in family court disputes, where otherwise their interests would be overlooked and they could potentially be put in harm’s way. Our clients would otherwise have no representation in a family court system designed to serve parents. We are there to remind all concerned that the most important parties in the case are the children. We work with parents to create co-parenting plans that enable and encourage a safe, positive and loving relationship that emphasizes the important roles of both a mother and father in a child’s life. In addition to poverty, our cases are exacerbated by conditions such as violence, neglect, abuse, addiction, mental illness, incarceration, and other chronic challenges.
Impact

2016 Accomplishments:

  1. Our Legal Representation Program served 554 children in 368 families.
  2. Our Families in Transition Mediation Program served 81 children in 51 families.
  3. Our free Children's Law Line served 1,781 children through 1,225 calls.
  4. We are currently in 12 jurisdictions in Connecticut. We are well respected in the legal and mental health community and have strong support from the State of Connecticut Office of the Chief Public Defender.
Current Organizational Goals:
  1. To increase community awareness of the vulnerability of children who are caught in the crossfire of family court disputes.
  2. To assist families and the court system by advocating for these indigent children directly.
  3. To advocate for systemic change in family court by advancing policies that will create a system that is collaborative in nature and focuses on children’s needs and interests.
  4. To expand our efforts to cover statewide judicial districts. 

 

Needs

Nearly 35,000 family court cases involving divorce and custody are filed annually in Connecticut. 50% of these cases involve minor children, 69% of whom are under age 10. Research has shown that children of divorcing parents suffer from depression, sleep disorders, loss of self-esteem, behavioral regression and other emotional problems. Children who live apart from one parent are more likely to drop out of school, have or cause a teen pregnancy, or experience a divorce in adulthood. The longer parental conflict continues, the greater the harm and ongoing trauma and consequences for children. Children in stable homes are better able to perform in school, interact appropriately with peers/siblings, and meet developmental milestones. Research demonstrates at least 75% of contested custody cases involve domestic violence in Connecticut. By helping families work through their conflicts and develop stable homes, we are contributing to transformational changes and the economic turnaround of many families. Many of our recommendations, implemented by the courts, require that parents remain employed, participate in treatment programs, and provide adequate housing for themselves and their children before the court will award them custody.

Children involved in family court are typically legally neglected in a system designed to serve parents engaged in adversarial disputes. In Connecticut, there is a provision for the appointment of counsel when parents do not agree, but if the family cannot afford to pay for an attorney, then the child often goes without representation.

CEO Statement
The Children's Law Center's attorneys provide legal representation to low income children involved in highly contentious divorce, custody and visitation cases in family court. Cases are typically complicated by exacerbating circumstances involving chronic conflict between parents, putting children who are already under significant stress at even higher risk of abuse or neglect.  The program is the only one of its kind in Connecticut. The cross-disciplinary model is unique in that it addresses not only the legal strategy of divorce and custody, but the mental health of the children and parents involved as well.  Research shows that children of divorcing couples suffer from depression, sleep disorders, loss of self-esteem, behavioral regression and other emotional problems.  The longer the parental conflict continues, the greater the consequences for the children.  By protecting a child's relationship with each parent, we help to ensure that the child continues to receive the love and support of the two most significant people in his or her life.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Crime & Legal - Related / Legal Services
Secondary Organization Category Crime & Legal - Related / Dispute Resolution & Mediation
Tertiary Organization Category Crime & Legal - Related / Single Organization Support
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
CLC's Legal Representation program operates in the New Haven, Hartford, New Britain, Waterbury, Tolland, Windham, Bridgeport/Fairfield, Stamford/Norwalk, Danbury, Litchfield, Middlesex and Norwich/New London judicial districts.
 
Our Children's Law Line is a toll-free service for the general public with questions concerning family law, statewide. 
 
The Families in Transition (FIT) program operates largely in, but is not restricted to, Greater Hartford and New Britain.
Programs
Description
The Legal Representation program focuses on serving the best interests of children in family court by addressing the needs of each child we serve. The program provides attorneys to children living in poverty who are affected by high conflict custody and visitation cases. In addition to qualifying as indigent at below 125% of the federal poverty guideline, one of the following exacerbating circumstances must also exist in order to qualify for CLC services: domestic violence, substance abuse, mental illness, child abuse/neglect, or other chronic conflict. An attorney/mental health team works together to shape legal strategies. Through our work, we seek to achieve the most stable, safe, and optimal living arrangement for children caught in the middle of a family crisis. 
 
In 2016, our Legal Representation Program served 554 children in 368 families. In New Haven Family Court alone we served 105 children.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
A judge appoints the Children’s Law Center as Attorney for the Minor Child (AMC) or Guardian ad Litem (GAL). An AMC, generally, represents the wishes of the child as long as those wishes are not detrimental to the child’s well being. A GAL acts as a witness for the Court and makes recommendations to the Court as to what parenting arrangement is in the children’s best interests. The staff attorney assigned to the case will, with the input and assistance of the staff mental health clinician, gather information about the child and family from collateral sources such as doctors, teachers, police, social workers and extended family. Our team works to improve the parenting skills of the parents, including ongoing education about how their conflict harms their children. We also help implement necessary services and referrals for the family, some of which may be court ordered.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Participation in the Legal Representation program serves to decrease the amount of stress and negative effects of parental conflict on children who are then better able to perform in school, interact with their peers and siblings, and meet developmental milestones. We encourage parents to be actively involved with their children, thereby ensuring that the children have support in their lives beyond what we are able to provide as they are experiencing transition. By helping families work through their conflicts and develop stable homes, we are directly contributing to family self-sufficiency. Many of our recommendations require that parents are employed, participate in treatment programs, and provide adequate housing for themselves and their children before the court will award custody.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The organization’s database tracks detailed demographic information about clients and their parents. The outcome measurement system for the Legal Representation program reviews cases upon their closing and collects data related to how the program minimizes parental conflict, reduces risk factors and puts services into place. The organization uses the results to gauge the program's effectiveness and to monitor any shortcomings.

2015 outcomes:
• In 96% of cases, judges adopted the CLC attorneys' recommendations.
• In most cases, the number of motions filed in the courts by parents is reduced once CLC becomes involved in a case.
• 70% of cases ended in settlement or agreement; no more than 30% went to trial.
• 75% of cases remained closed and did not return to court for further litigation, indicating positive resolution and no re-emerging issues.
• In 64% of cases, parents reported that co-parenting improved after CLC involvement; 62% indicated that the family environment improved.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

7-Year Old Jonathan was living with his mother, while his dad was incarcerated. When Jonathan and his mother met with our CLC attorney, it was clear that mom had significant mental health issues. She was withdrawn and barely spoke. DCF was brought in and Jonathan was sent to live with his paternal grandparents, where he has been for some time. In the meantime, dad was released from prison, but had no job, no place to live. Jonathan’s mother entered counseling and treatment, showing good signs of progress: her behavior is now stable, she is on regular medication and is holding down a job. Dad is also making positive strides, has been compliant with parole, has a job and an apartment. During this time, Jonathan has remained with his grandparents. Both parents are anxious to be a part of Jonathan’s life.  The court and our attorney have concurred that it is time to reunify him with his parents. They now share joint custody and Jonathan is beginning to experience a safe, consistent family environment with both his mother and father in his life.

Description

The Children’s Law Line is a free, state-wide telephone help line that answers legal questions and gives advice, information and referrals to people seeking help with family court issues. Our system to aid and protect children consists of a maze of agencies, courts, laws and resources that is often overwhelming even to the most experienced advocates, and simply not navigable to those of limited means. The Law Line is designed to be an accessible resource, with the majority of referrals coming from 2-1-1, Infoline, Statewide Legal Services, DCF, courts, attorneys, the internet and word of mouth.  The phone number is 1-888-LAW-DOOR. In 2016, the Law Line served 1,781 children through 1,225 calls.

Population Served Families / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Children’s Law Line provides immediate assistance to parents, guardians and other service providers who have concerns about the safety and well-being of children in their care. Callers to the Law Line are able to access services that help them deal with their specific questions and problems, all of which involve children. The assistance provided to callers creates an immediate impact, reducing or fully alleviating family stress. Because most callers have no attorney of their own, the Law Line provides critical insight into the legal system.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The Law Line program is designed to impact nearly 1,500 children annually. Since the economic recession began in 2008, our goal has been to maintain the program at its current level of service. In 2014, the Law Line served a total of 1,302 children.

Because callers to the Children's Law Line are connected to additional community services and provided resources that address their specific situation, they are able to begin the process of addressing complicated issues that impact their children, or children in their custody. With this help, parents (and sometimes grandparents) are able to tackle, with some measure of efficiency, problems that could be time-consuming and intractable. Children are the ultimate beneficiaries, as their lives become less complicated in the long run. By reducing conflict and helping guide parents and guardians toward a resolution, even in the early stages of the process, the negative impact is reduced.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
An annual statistical evaluation is compiled that includes the total number of calls, caller demographics and issues raised by callers. This data is compared to summaries of previous years. Survey calls are made no less than once a year to solicit feedback on customer satisfaction with the Children's Law Line. The study asks to what degree the caller found the information to be helpful and whether their situation has improved, in addition to measuring and assessing the issue they were calling about. Our most recent outcome report for the Law Line indicates that 94% of respondents reported a combined positive of “Very Helpful” or “Helpful” when evaluating the help they received. We often hear comments like, "it's because of you that I have a plan. I can move forward with my life and take care of my children."
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Dana called the Law Line because, although she shared joint legal custody of her child, she feared for her son’s safety when he was with his father. Dana reported that there had been a history of domestic violence, that her son had witnessed the abuse, that the father was exhibiting erratic behavior and was non compliant with their current custody order. Through a series of six phone calls to the Law Line, our staff was able to walk Dana through the process of filing a motion to modify her custody and visitation order. We helped Dana understand the family court process and what to expect, beginning with family relations all the way to speaking with a judge. Dana even called us back before she went to court, to rehearse her statements for accuracy and to make sure that she stayed on point. Recently, we received a final phone call from Dana just to say “thanks” for all the help and support she had received from the Law Line. She had gone to court and the judge had ruled in her favor.
Description The Families in Transition (FIT) program is a hybrid family mediation service and parenting education program that helps families resolve their immediate issues while educating parents about how extended conflict impacts their children. We help parents understand each others' perspectives, and give them tools to improve their communication with each other. Sessions are facilitated by a volunteer male/female team consisting of an attorney and a mental health professional, both of whom are certified in family mediation. The service helps families avoid expensive and time-consuming litigation, thus shielding children from the harmful effects of long-term parental conflict. The FIT program is currently the area's only mediation service designated to serve low-income families. Most clients are court referrals, however, the program is open to anyone in need of service. The program operates on a sliding-scale fee basis. In 2016, the program served 81 children in 51 families.
Population Served Families / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
The Families in Transition (FIT) mediation sessions protect children from the harm that high conflict parenting disputes cause. Parents come to understand that they will be co-parents for the rest of their children's lives, and develop appropriate communication skills. Clients obtain settlements similar to those which would be achieved in a contentious court case, as an alternative to the stress of legal fees and court appearances. Through mediation sessions, participants maintain a sense of control over their lives.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Participation in the Families in Transition (FIT) mediation sessions is designed to improve communication and parenting as the participants restructure their relationship. Mediated arguments are more often observed and followed, helping to mitigate future problems especially when both parties are involved and invested in the process.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The success of the FIT program is indicated by the clients' willingness to continue participating in the mediation process until a settlement has been reached, and/or participants have successfully implemented new communication tools. Success is also indicated by clients' willingness to return to mediation if future issues arise, rather than resorting to adversarial court proceedings.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
In 2014, The Children's Center handled 51 FIT cases, affecting the lives of 76 children. However, it is difficult to measure family participation during specific time periods, as cases are ongoing and participation fluctuates.
Description

The Children’s Law Center advocates for improvements in the legal system that will better safeguard children. We actively participate in ongoing advocacy efforts at the state level; promoting professional development in the legal community concerning the representation of children, and monitoring legislative initiatives related to children and family law.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
The Children's Law Center's Advocacy program enables legal professionals to gain a greater understanding of the unique practice of representing children in family court. Similarly, decision-making bodies (e.g. legislature, Supreme Court) will gain understanding into how changes to the current practice are likely to impact children in Family Court.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The ultimate change resulting from the Children's Law Center's Advocacy program is improvement in the legal practice of representing children in Family Court.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The success of the Children's Law Center's Advocacy program is tracked by submitting testimony regarding proposed legislation and its impact on current legal practices. CLC will then analyze the legislative actions affecting the practice of representing children in family court. The Children's Law Center also educates professionals serving children and families, the community, and parents.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Since 2010, the Children’s Law Center became the coordinator of the Regional Academies for Children's Advocacy (RACA), a group of four regional academies consisting of legal and mental health professionals involved in child advocacy in family court. The purpose is to provide support and assistance to professionals newer to the field and to create a forum for questions, concerns, trends, difficult case scenarios, etc. Each of the four regional academies meets approximately 3 times a year, with a maximum capacity of 35 attendees per meeting, to discuss a topic of interest. The group explores such issues as attorneys and social workers collaborating to focus on the mental health of children in divorce cases, and psychological vs. psychiatric evaluations, when to order which, and what to expect to get when you order them. Since the Children’s Law Center was appointed coordinator, all sessions have been held at or near maximum capacity.
Program Comments
CEO Comments

Because our Legal Representation program is well established and well respected in the legal and mental health communities, CLC does not encounter many challenges in its operation and implementation. The greatest challenge to the Legal Representation program continues to be our capacity to meet the demand for our services. Our New Haven staff attorney carries a full case load at all times and we are forced to turn away cases. As our staff attorney closes a case and we reopen intake, it fills to capacity immediately. The obstacle to meeting this need is funding to support more resources and staff to fulfill the demand. We look forward to increased funding from our New Haven area supporters.

Measuring programmatic outcomes has been a challenge. Our organization has garnered great respect and support from the local legal community and at the state levels. Our programs are unique and innovative, and subject to strict client confidentiality. The nature of our work with young child clients does not always allow us to measure long-term outcomes successfully. To address this challenge, we participated in the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving's 18-month Building Evaluation Capacity Program ("BEC") which helped us find more effective ways to measure our outcomes.

We are also encountering challenges with funders in terms of their evolving changes in funding guidelines. In the past, many funders supported a broad range of "human services/basic needs" organizations, in which we are categorized. Priorities are becoming more focused with targeted emphasis on children's literacy, community redevelopment and financial stability, the environment and hunger. Although CLC's services have great impact on the well-being of children and families, we cannot claim a direct correlation to the above focus areas. We have been notified by United Way of Central and Northeast CT that beginning in their fiscal year 2016-17, CLC may no longer fit their guidelines, after many years of support. Other funders have already determined more narrowly focused priorities.

CEO/Executive Director
Atty. Justine Rakich-Kelly
Term Start Oct 2000
Email justine@clcct.org
Experience

Justine Rakich-Kelly graduated from Western Connecticut University, cum laude, with a BS in Justice and Law Administration. Between college and law school she worked in the legal department at Union Carbide doing corporate divestitures. She earned her law degree from the University of Connecticut in 1991. Upon graduating from law school, Justine began her legal career at Koskoff, McMahon & Condon in Plainville, Connecticut. In 1993 the Law Offices of Justine Rakich-Kelly were opened, specializing in juvenile and family law, with a focus on poverty cases. Justine joined Statewide Legal Services in 1998 as a legal aid attorney in the Family Unit, and was soon promoted to manager of the unit. In October of 2000, she was named Executive Director of The Children’s Law Center.

During Justine’s tenure, Children’s Law Center has been at the forefront of incorporating a mental health component into the process of legal representation of children in family court. The model is the only one of its kind in the state of Connecticut, and has been widely adapted nationally.

Under Justine's leadership, The Children's Law Center has expanded from 3 jurisdictions to 9 jurisdictions, from a full time staff of 2 to a staff of 13, and the annual budget has grown to $1,237,000.00.

Justine is a member of the Connecticut Bar Association, Family section and is a Fellow of the Connecticut Bar Foundation, where she serves on the Education Subcommittee. She is a member of the AFCC and the NACC, and is a tireless advocate for serving the best interest of children in family court. Under Justine's leadership, the Children's Law Center hosts the Statewide Academy of Child Advocate, a work group of professionals dedicated to improving the lives of children whose parents are battling over their custody in court. Finally, Justine continues to serve as a facilitator for the Statewide Training for Guardians ad litem and Attorneys for Minor Children hosted by the State of Connecticut Judicial Branch.

Justine celebrated her 15th year as Executive Director at The Children’s Law Center in 2015.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 13
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 90
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 80%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 13
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Deputy Director
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
Our work provides us with opportunities to collaborate with other organizations. We work cooperatively with Lawyers for Children America and the Center for Children's Advocacy, both children's advocacy programs. Our services complement each other; neither provides legal representation in family court. We also enjoy good, professional relationships with Greater Hartford Legal Aid, Statewide Legal Services, and Connecticut Legal Services, all of whom share a common commitment to legal advocacy of the poor. Our staff has ongoing, collaborative relationships with many other service providers to whom we refer our clients for additional services, such as Klingberg Family Centers, KidSafe, Wheeler Clinic and The Village for Children and Families. In addition we have recently begun a collaboration with Bridge to Success in Waterbury and Read to Grow, which has donated over 600 books to CLC to help us create bonding with families and encourage children's literacy.
Board Chair
Atty. Robert Madden
Company Affiliation University of St. Joseph
Term Oct 2015 to Oct 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Ms. Kelly Barnett
Mr. Mark Boxer Ph.D.Cigna
Mr. Tim Buckley Trumbull Group Benefits
Mr. Jonathan Fink CPABlum Shapiro
Atty. Sandra Gersten Gersten Law Offices
Mr. William Johnson Johnson Financial Group
Atty. Pamela Magnano O’Connell, Flaherty & Attmore-West LLC
Hon. C. Ian McLachlan
Atty. Christine Miller Reid & Riege, PC
Mr. Gaurav Patel SS&C Technologies
Ms. Patricia Pheanious Retired, Department of Social Services
Mr. Patrick Proctor Retired
Mr. James Russell CPA/ABVFilomeno & Company, P.C.
Dr. Elizabeth Thayer Beacon Behavioral Services, LLC
Mr. Jovanni Valentini The Hartford
Mrs. Maureen Zavatone Financial Advisor
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 10
Female 7
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 60%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Board Governance
Finance
Program / Program Planning
CEO Comments

In 2012 the governance committee began a review of the by-laws of the organization. At our September 12, 2013 board meeting, term limits were instituted. Going forward, all new board members will serve a term of three years; current board members will have the option to serve an additional three year term after which they will cycle off the board for at least one year. Each current board member is given an option of extending their term into the next year (2015) or year after (2016) to avoid a mass exodus at the next Annual Meeting and to allow for a steady 1/3 off, each year of the 3 year cycle. The by-laws continue to be reviewed and additional proposals for modifications may be made at future meetings.

Each board member is expected to serve on at least one committee and make a financial commitment to the organization. 

 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $1,124,367.00
Projected Expenses $1,114,367.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$342,539$405,370$458,687
Government Contributions$280,480$245,403$0
Federal------
State$129,838$54,919--
Local------
Unspecified$150,642$190,484--
Individual Contributions------
------
$301,267$328,180$424,776
Investment Income, Net of Losses$23,586$17,062$6,968
Membership Dues------
Special Events$139,819$124,451--
Revenue In-Kind------
Other($23,029)($22,257)$92,800
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$961,553$856,672$870,227
Administration Expense$113,554$118,677$110,040
Fundraising Expense$97,595$99,792$87,245
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.911.020.92
Program Expense/Total Expenses82%80%82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue13%13%19%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$1,273,031$1,330,801$1,320,017
Current Assets$772,184$833,686$835,277
Long-Term Liabilities----$8,937
Current Liabilities$135,866$51,793$59,282
Total Net Assets$1,137,165$1,279,008$1,251,798
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Bar Foundation $188,551CT Bar Foundation $217,052CT Office of Chief Public Defender $420,500
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountAmerican Savings Foundation $111,791Hartford Foundation for Public Giving $114,472CT Bar Foundation $220,873
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountState of CT Judicial Branch $109,838American Savings Foundation $102,081American Savings Foundation $96,346
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities5.6816.1014.09
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%1%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments The Children's Law Center maintains strong fiscal health. We have an active and prudent Board of Directors and a strong Finance Committee that pays careful and regular attention to our organizational budget throughout the year. Our current financial strategy is to increase revenue streams and expand our program outreach statewide.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 30 Arbor Street
Hartford, CT 06106
Primary Phone 860 232-9993
Contact Email clc@clcct.org
CEO/Executive Director Atty. Justine Rakich-Kelly
Board Chair Atty. Robert Madden
Board Chair Company Affiliation University of St. Joseph

 

Related Information

Promote Civic Vitality

Greater New Haven’s vibrancy is linked to its communities’ support of its neighborhoods, public gardens and sports, as well as its commitment to the protection of its people and pets.

Nurture Children & Youth

When families, schools and communities take the view that children and youth are valued and respected assets to society, they necessarily support environments that nurture youth development. Children raised to embrace positive social values, to seek self-understanding, and to value their self-worth grow to become community-minded young adults with a sense of belonging and a belief in their resiliency. See how you can help our community's children grow into tomorrow's leaders.