New Haven Farms
P.O. Box 8953
New Haven CT 06532
Contact Information
Address P.O. Box 8953
New Haven, CT 06532-
Telephone (203) 9976152 x
Fax 203-9976153
E-mail info@newhavenfarms.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

New Haven Farms promotes health and community development through urban agriculture.  

The Farm-Based Wellness Program provides free cooking, nutritional, and agricultural education to participants referred from healthcare providers in New Haven for 16-20 weeks during the growing season. After each session, participants take home a weekly share of nutrient-dense fruits and vegetables grown on one of eight urban farms sites.  Health outcomes, behavior change, and food security are measured throughout the program.

The goals of New Haven Farms’ Farm-Based Wellness Program are to:

·     Produce nutrient-dense vegetables and fruits on seven urban farm sites;

·     Distribute a weekly share of fresh, affordable produce to fifty-seventy families;

·     Improve health outcomes and reduce food insecurity by increasing participants’ consumption of nutrient-rich, fresh vegetables;

·     Increase knowledge and skills of growing, choosing and preparing healthy food; and

·     Build a sense of community, and increase social capital by creating and maintaining relationships among farm members, volunteers, and neighborhood residents.

Participants are motivated to stay involved with the farms beyond the program.  In 2015, an Incubator Garden was created in partnership with the New Haven Land Trust to provide advanced growing techniques among a cohort of families who had completed the Farm-Based Wellness Program. Monthly gatherings in the off-season and a Community Health Ambassador training program are strategies to keep participants engaged year-round and cultivate community leadership from our participants.
 
Affordable food shares and a farm stand will also become available in 2016, not only to past participants of the Farm-Based Wellness Program but also other low- and middle- income community members, who do not need a medical referral to make purchases.
 
The Peels & Wheels Compost Program began in September 2014 to collect household food waste by bicycle and process it at Phoenix Press Farm, where it becomes nutrient-rich soil. To date, it has composted over 26,000 pounds of food scraps through a neighborhood-level weekly pick-ups.
 
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2011
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Russell L Moore
Board Chair Ms. Doss Venema
Board Chair Company Affiliation Volunteer
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $310,080.00
Projected Expenses $327,427.00
Statements
Mission

New Haven Farms promotes health and community development through urban agriculture.  

The Farm-Based Wellness Program provides free cooking, nutritional, and agricultural education to participants referred from healthcare providers in New Haven for 16-20 weeks during the growing season. After each session, participants take home a weekly share of nutrient-dense fruits and vegetables grown on one of eight urban farms sites.  Health outcomes, behavior change, and food security are measured throughout the program.

The goals of New Haven Farms’ Farm-Based Wellness Program are to:

·     Produce nutrient-dense vegetables and fruits on seven urban farm sites;

·     Distribute a weekly share of fresh, affordable produce to fifty-seventy families;

·     Improve health outcomes and reduce food insecurity by increasing participants’ consumption of nutrient-rich, fresh vegetables;

·     Increase knowledge and skills of growing, choosing and preparing healthy food; and

·     Build a sense of community, and increase social capital by creating and maintaining relationships among farm members, volunteers, and neighborhood residents.

Participants are motivated to stay involved with the farms beyond the program.  In 2015, an Incubator Garden was created in partnership with the New Haven Land Trust to provide advanced growing techniques among a cohort of families who had completed the Farm-Based Wellness Program. Monthly gatherings in the off-season and a Community Health Ambassador training program are strategies to keep participants engaged year-round and cultivate community leadership from our participants.
 
Affordable food shares and a farm stand will also become available in 2016, not only to past participants of the Farm-Based Wellness Program but also other low- and middle- income community members, who do not need a medical referral to make purchases.
 
The Peels & Wheels Compost Program began in September 2014 to collect household food waste by bicycle and process it at Phoenix Press Farm, where it becomes nutrient-rich soil. To date, it has composted over 26,000 pounds of food scraps through a neighborhood-level weekly pick-ups.
 
Background

In 2008, employees of Chabaso Bakery, located in the Fair Haven neighborhood, started an organic vegetable garden on bakery property. In 2010, Chabaso Bakery partnered with the Fair Haven Community Health Center (FHCHC) and turned the garden operation and management over to the clinic’s Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). FHCHC pre-diabetic patients and their families attended weekly garden workdays, taking home shares of the harvest in exchange for their participation. The program provided impoverished Fair Haven residents, and their families, many of whom are at risk of diabetes and obesity, greater access to fresh, organic, and nutrient-dense vegetables, as well as an opportunity to be physically active. They also received nutrition education and cooking instruction as part of the program. 

In August of 2010, Rebecca Kline, the DPP Garden Manager, invited a large group of interested citizens to explore the idea of scaling up the Chabaso/FHCHC DPP garden initiative to make urban farming a part of everyday life in New Haven.  From this initial meeting, a working group was formed, and New Haven Farms was born.  Its mission is to promote health and community development through urban agriculture.
 
In 2013, Phoenix Press Farm was built at the end of James Street, and Jacqueline Maisonpierre became the Farm Manager. 
 
In 2015, New Haven Farms built its largest farm site to date at 611-613 Ferry Street, began taking participants referred from three other healthcare providers in New Haven, and started a 20-member CSA to generate revenue for the Farm-Based Wellness Program.  Ferry Street Farm allowed New Haven Farms to partner with the New Haven Land Trust on an Incubator Garden, where 22 families began growing more food themselves after completing the Farm-Based Wellness Program.  James Jenkins became the Executive Director in May 2015.  
 
An affordable farm stand and CSA program are planned in 2016 to increasing participants' opportunities and choices after they complete one summer of the Farm-Based Wellness Program, as well as provide low- and middle-income residents easier access to fresh, local food without needing a referral from a healthcare provider.
 
 
Impact
Recent Accomplishments:
  1. 25,000 pounds of fruits and vegetables produced over the last two years on less than one acre across eight sites
  2. Farm-Based Wellness Program 2013-2015 enrolled 188 participants referred from four healthcare providers in an inclusive model for children and other family members to also attend (approximately 800 people); 64% participation rate in 2015; 94% reported changes in eating habits; 50% of program participants in all three years reported decreases in BMI and weight change.
  3. Inaugural Incubator Garden helped 22 families from the Farm-Based Wellness Program grow their own food for a season with advanced training
  4. Peels & Wheel Compost Program has diverted and processed over 26,000 pounds of food scraps since September 2014
  5. Programming expansion for 2016 includes incentivized, affordable CSA shares and farm stand; monthly gatherings and gardening workshops in the off-season; and increased community gardening opportunities for graduates.
Goals:
  1. Enroll 50-70 new participants in the Farm-Based Wellness Program and increase outcomes through program improvement.
  2. Enroll 30 past participants in the Incubator Garden and build affordable CSA and farm stand sales among past participants and other community members
  3. Reach 60 households for compost members.
  4. Strengthen Community Health Ambassador Program, Community Advisory Board, and other participant-empowered community leadership development opportunities including roles in Farm-Based Wellness Program.
Needs
Needs:
  1. Secure multi-year funding for Farm-Based Wellness Program participants' education and food shares (~ $800 per participant/household; $56,000)
  2. Increase staffing to cultivate and manage volunteers, participants moving into leadership roles, and other programmatic outreach and partnerships ($15,600 Community Leadership Coordinator salary; $6,000 CT Food Justice VISTA Member).
CEO Statement
Volunteer at New Haven Farms.  Meet our participants (once patients, now producers) growing their own food, help our Cooking and Nutrition Educator prepare a Farm-Based Wellness Program meal, work with your hands outside in the sunshine, experience Phoenix Press Farm on the Quinnipiac River at sunset, meet neighborhood leaders, learn gardening tips, sign up to become a composter.
 
Learn the relationships between poverty, economic inequality, food access, nutrition, and chronic disease. 1 in 3 New Haven residents is food insecure. 1 in 2 is either diabetic or pre-diabetic. 1/3 of households in six low-income communities in New Haven makes less than $15,000/per year; the next 1/3 makes between $15,001-30,000. 40% of food is wasted in America.
 
Join us to change the story in our communities. In 2015, its fifth year, New Haven Farms produced 13,500 pounds of food on one acre of land--eight New Haven sites, once vacant lots.  22 Farm-Based Wellness Program graduates became Incubator Gardeners, growing their own food with their family members and learning advanced skills. Over 50 families received agricultural, cooking and nutrition education with free weekly fruit and vegetable shares for four months. Help us grow the next five years.
Board Chair Statement

New Haven Farms and urban agriculture grew out of a concern for the health and welfare of our employees and people in our neighborhood.   The initial efforts were unfocused; the garden survived for two years because of the wonderful organic soil sourced by my wife, Nancy Dennett, and through the intercession of the Diabetes Prevention Program at Fair Haven Community Health Center. We evolved to a nonprofit, hired a director, and began the expansion and programing that has now grown for each of the last three years.  

Growing vegetables in the inner city poses challenges—soil is almost universally unfit, there are no large plots to scale up the farm production process. These and other factors would possibly prevent any for-profit organization from attempting to farm here.


But converting empty lots strewn with garbage, as we did on Ferry Street, into a field of organic greens; bringing people otherwise much restricted by the choices in “urban deserts” to a converted parking lot on the edge of the Quinnipiac to assist in harvesting the best available organic produce; and listening to the participants in the educational programs praise the impact on their eating habits—we know and have demonstrated that the efforts and costs are well repaid in community development and individual health and wellness.

If we accomplished no more than making people aware of the ability to enhance their access to fresh vegetables, it would be a success. If the conversion of vacant lots to green fields merely added to the quality of the neighborhood, it would be a success. But the longer term goal of New Haven Farms is to foster, throughout the City, great awareness of the impact of diet on health and greater involvement of as many individuals as possible in securing access to the necessary food.

Imagine a city where lawns gave way to kale and tomato plants.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Agricultural Programs
Secondary Organization Category Health Care / Community Health Systems
Tertiary Organization Category Education / Educational Services
Areas Served
New Haven

New Haven Farms, serves a population that is 91% racial and/or ethnic minority (75% Latino and 57% African-American) and 9% Caucasian.  Over 97% of the members fall below 200% of the federal poverty rate, and of those, 89% are at or below 100% of poverty. Seventy percent are women, and Spanish is the preferred language by over half of the participant population. New Haven Farms receives patient referrals from the pool of the approximately 15,000 Fair Haven Community Health Center (FHCHC) and Haven patients, as well as referrals beginning at Cornell Scott Hill Health, Connecticut Mental Health Center, and Yale Primary Care. The percentage of minorities is 91%, compared with 40% in the city, indicating that the percentage of Latinos among our farm members is 200% greater than in the city. Fair Haven, where seven of our farm sites are located, has been designated a Medically Underserved Area and a Health Professional Shortage Area.

Programs
Description

The Farm-Based Wellness Program is intended to benefit low-income residents of New Haven whose ability to access fresh affordable produce may be limited by a lack of nearby grocery stores, lack of access to transportation, lack of income, or for other reasons.

Participants referred from healthcare providers either have, or are at risk for, diet-related chronic disease and live within 200% of the federal poverty line. They participant in 16-20 weeks of hands-on education on the farm through a program that is open to their entire family and that also runs a youth education component.

Farm members receive baskets of fresh, organic farm produce on a weekly basis for the season, and are required to attend at least one two-hour, on-farm educational session per week. During those sessions, members participate in cooking classes and are given nutrition information about the nutrient-dense foods that they harvest that week, with culturally-relevant recipes for them to try at home. They are taught how to plant, harvest, and tend the vegetables, which gives them the added health benefit of being physically active. In addition, members are provided with vegetable seeds and seedlings to encourage them to start backyard gardens with their families.

 

Population Served At-Risk Populations / Minorities / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Three hypotheses guide New Haven Farms Fresh Produce Prescription Program:

Hypothesis 1Fresh Produce Prescription Program membership will improve food security status

Hypothesis 2Fresh Produce Prescription Program membership will increase fruit and vegetable intake

Hypothesis 3: Fresh Produce Prescription Program membership will improve BMI and HbA1c

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. New Haven Farms aims to establish a farm or garden associated with all 1,124 federal qualified health clinics in the United States. Our vision is that patients at risk for diet-related chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes, are referred to our farms and granted access to nutrient-dense foods, cooking classes, and nutrition education. Patients' health thereby improves, and along with it the environmental sustainability and economic growth of participating communities is enhanced.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

By the end of 16 farm education sessions, we measure success based on whether participation can reduce diabetes risk factors by increasing fruit and vegetable intake and by reducing food insecurity of participating clients. Pre/post tests are used to evaluate changes in food security, fruit and vegetable intake, BMI, and HbA1c. Every week, each farm participant is weighed, and fills out food insecurity and fruit/vegetable intake surveys. Further analysis entails the use of an OLS regression to ascertain if there is a dose-response of vegetable intake on diabetes risk-factors, controlling for medication and adherence, vegetable intake as well other household and demographic factors. Likewise, process information gathered at weekly intakes allows a measure of “exposure” of number of hours spent on the farm contributing to farm productivity to examine the effect on this factor on fruit/vegetable intake as well as risk factors.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

The client database at the Fair Haven Community Health Center indicates that 79% (n=5490) of the 6,950 adults served at the FHCHC are overweight or obese, concentrating an effect that is seen in the broader community. Many of these adults grew up on farms, and as such are able to use their agricultural knowledge for the first time upon arriving in this country. They report a significant increase in both food security and fruit and vegetable consumption. For most of our participating children, this is the first time they have seen a fresh carrot or tomato. They are more inclined to taste all these vegetables when they plant and harvest them themselves, than ever before. 

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Russell L Moore
Term Start Apr 2017
Email russell@newhavenfarms.org
Experience Executive Director has held nonprofit senior management and leadership positions for the last twenty years.  These professional experiences include Executive Director, American Diabetes Association, Philadelphia, PA, Director of Individual Giving, Oxfam America, Director of Leadership Circle Gifts, WGBH  Foundation.  The Executive Director recently served as Interim Executive Director of the Poughkeepsie Farm Project.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 7
Number of Volunteers 27
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 0%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
James Jenkins - Jan 2017
Rebecca Kline Aug 2010 - May 2015
Senior Staff
Title Farm Manager
Experience/Biography

Crystal Spring Community Farm,Brunswick, ME

Full Season Farm Apprentice(April ’12 – Current)

-  Managed a diversified organic CSA farm: twelve acres under mixed vegetable cultivation, 75       acres of mixed hay and pastured fields, flock of 75 Katahdin Sheep

-  Responsibilities included: plant propagation, cultivation, and harvesting, pest and disease          control, crop planning and rotation, seed ordering and budgeting, tractor maintenance     and      use, rotational grazing and hay production, and customer service

 

Holbrook Farm,Bethel, CT

Farm Manager(November ‘11 – February ‘12) -Assistant Farm Manager(June – October ‘11)

-   Managed vegetable production, farm crew, compost operation, volunteers, wholesale                               accounts and daily business activities

-   Managed winter greenhouse production and flock of 350 laying hens

 

YMCA Camp Orkila,Orcas Island, WA

Outdoor Environmental Educator(February - June ‘11)

            -  Taught science based curriculum, forest and marine ecology, to middle school students                -   Facilitated challenge course and team building activities with student and adult groups

 

Cheetah Conservation Fund,Otjiwarongo, Namibia

Volunteer & Conference Coordinator, Environmental Educator (January - July ‘10)

            -   Conducted outreach environmental education classes to school children in Northern Namibia    -   Managed all volunteer scheduling, coordinated arrival and departure of all guests

                 -   Coordinated international training courses for wildlife conservation professionals

 

New Pond Farm,Redding, CT

Alternate Camp Director (June ‘09- August ‘09)

            -   Supervised counselors in addition to residential campers

            -   Developed and implemented educational classes in farming, animal care, and ecology

 

EDUCATION & ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS

University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources,Burlington, VT

-   B. Sc. in Environmental Science, Conservation Biology Concentration, May ‘09 

-   Honors College - Phi Beta Kappa - Grade Point Average: 3.74 

 

 

ADDITIONAL SKILLS

Language:Fluent in Spanish, basic understanding of German 

 

Computer:Experience with Macs, PCs, Microsoft Word, Excel, and ArcGIS

 

Certifications:  Trained Doula, First Aid & CPR

Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation No
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Collaborations

New Haven Farms draws on key partners to fulfill its mission. Key partners include Fair Haven Community Health Center, Cornell Scott Hill Health Center, Connecticut Mental Health Center, Chabaso Bakery, City of New Haven Community Services Administration, City of New Haven Livable City Initiative,Yale Sustainable Food Program, the New Haven Food Policy Council, and Bishop's Orchards.

Additionally, New Haven Farms is comprised of individuals who work for and are connected to other key organizations in the community, including Cooking Matters, the New Haven Land Trust, City Seed, Yale School of Public Health, Junta Center for Progressive Action, Wholesome Wave, Haven Free Clinic, Edgerton Park Conservancy, Common Ground High School, and Cold Spring School.  

Board Chair
Ms. Doss Venema
Company Affiliation Volunteer
Term Feb 2016 to Feb 2018
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Willliam Dennett PHDWakefield Eductational Consulting
Mr. Bruce Ditman Marcum LLP
Ms. Jean Dyer SC CT Regional Water Authority
Mr. James Farnam James Farnam LLC
Brianna Ficcadenti Yale School of Management
Dr. Frank Lobo MDYale-New Haven Hospital / School of Medicine
Elizabeth Magenheimer RNFair Haven Community Health Center
Mr. Sean Matteson ConnCAN
Ms. Janie McCotter Daycare Owner
Mr. Charles Negaro Chabaso Bakery and Atticus Bookstore Cafe
Angela Oren Esq.Community Volunteer
Ms Abigail Paine Fair Haven Community Health Center
Mr. Todd Rofuth PhdSouthern Connecticut State University
Dr. Lisa Sanders MDYale-New Haven Hospital / Yale School of Medicine
Mr. Ted Stonbely The Montessori School
Ann Wiley Foilage Design Systems
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 7
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Constituent Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Ms. Georgina Castelan New Haven Farms Incubator Gardener
Ms. Luz Catarineau Colville Amistad Catholic Worker
Ms. Suzanne Edwards Horticulturalist - Newhallville
Ms. Concepcion Guerrero New Haven Farms Incubator Gardener
Ms. Nilda Martinez Pequenas Ligas Hispanas de New Haven
Ms. Pamela Monk Thomas Chapel Church
Ms. Leslie Radcliffe Truman Street Community Garden
Ms. Jamilah Rasheed Field of Greens Community Garden
Ms. Ruth Torres New Haven Farms Incubator Gardener
Standing Committees
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Finance
Program / Program Planning
CEO Comments
New Haven Farms created the Community Advisory Board, consisting of past program participants and other representative community members, to establish a new structure for community dialogue and input.  The group meets once a month for dinner and discussion.  Meetings are in Spanish and English, and members agree to serve for at least six months.  Community Advisory Board members have already improved our referral process, provided feedback on educational programming, enhanced formal leadership roles for past participants, envisioned new community partnerships, and advised New Haven Farms toward expanding into new neighborhoods.
 
New Haven Farms updated governance documents and practices following the hire of a new Executive Director, and a four-month strategic planning process resulted in a 2016-2020 strategic plan for the next five years. New Haven Farms seeks to increase contracts and multi-year contributions to secure wellness programming, expand food production on new farm sites, and continue innovating and improving programs through long-term staff development, community involvement, increased partnerships, and board leadership.  
 
 
 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $310,080.00
Projected Expenses $327,427.00
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902015
Form 990-EZ2014
Form 990-N2013
Form 9902011
IRS Letter of Exemption
New Haven Farms 501C3
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$171,745$44,465--
Administration Expense$26,929$117,621--
Fundraising Expense$12,392----
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.301.12--
Program Expense/Total Expenses81%27%--
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue5%0%--
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$108,583$43,407--
Current Assets$102,333$35,357--
Long-Term Liabilities$4,892----
Current Liabilities--$3,220--
Total Net Assets$103,691$40,187--
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- ----
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- ----
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- ----
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities--10.98--
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets5%0%--
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address P.O. Box 8953
New Haven, CT 06532
Primary Phone 203 9976152
Contact Email info@newhavenfarms.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Russell L Moore
Board Chair Ms. Doss Venema
Board Chair Company Affiliation Volunteer

 

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