American Symphony Orchestra League
33 W. 60th Street
5th Floor
New York NY 10023-7905
Contact Information
Address 33 W. 60th Street
5th Floor
New York, NY 10023-7905
Telephone (212) 822-4050 x
Fax 212-262-5198
E-mail arisbud@americanorchestras.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
The mission of the League of American Orchestras is to advance the experience of orchestral music, support the people and organizations that create it, and champion the contributions they make to the health and vibrancy of communities.

 

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1962
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jesse Rosen
Board Chair Ms. Patricia A. Richards
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired; Former Senior Vice President and Regional Manager, The Private Bank of Wells Fargo; Chair, Board of Trustees, Utah Symphony | Opera; Board of Trustees, Westminster College, Salt Lake City
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission The mission of the League of American Orchestras is to advance the experience of orchestral music, support the people and organizations that create it, and champion the contributions they make to the health and vibrancy of communities.

 

Background
The League of American Orchestras was founded in 1942 and chartered by Congress two decades later. The first grass-roots meeting on May 21, 1942, was organized by Leta G. Snow, manager of the Kalamazoo Symphony, who wanted to exchange ideas and information with other civic orchestra leaders. Twenty-three people attended the inaugural meeting in Chicago, and forty orchestras from seventeen states subsequently accepted an invitation to join the new organization as charter members. Despite travel restrictions brought on by World War II, the League managed to convene national meetings three more times that decade, and in 1950, annual conventions were declared “the order of things.” The League’s first public policy challenge, and the issue which brought the smaller civic orchestras together with the larger professional orchestras (which were not part of the League when it was founded), was the campaign in 1950-51 to repeal the twenty percent federal excise tax that had been imposed on concert tickets during the war. The effort to repeal the tax was successful, due in large part to the League’s leadership in forming a grassroots campaign. The League’s first executive, Helen Thompson, was credited with the success of the campaign, securing the League’s role as representative of all U.S. orchestras, large and small.
 
Today, with headquarters in New York City and an office in Washington, D.C., the League is one of the nation’s largest performing arts service organizations and the only national organization dedicated solely to the orchestral experience. Its diverse membership of nearly 800 orchestras across North America runs the gamut from world-renowned symphonies to community groups, from summer festivals to student and youth ensembles.
Impact Orchestras are playing increasingly essential roles in advancing civic priorities, refreshing the repertoire with new and multidisciplinary works, and connecting with new audiences through new concert formats and marketing strategies. The League provoked the conversations and introduced the perspective, knowledge, and tools to help orchestras make these and many other changes. Highlights of the League’s activities over the last year include the Los Angeles debut of our Essentials of Orchestra Management seminar, an intense, 10-day course in running a fiscally sound and artistically vibrant orchestra in the 21st century; the 3rd round of Getty Education and Community Investment Grants, which awarded 22 grants to orchestras for a variety of community-based programs; the launch of the Noteboom Governance Center, through which the League delivers substantive support to orchestra boards through a broadening and deepening of engagement with orchestra board members; and the release of an unprecedented resource, Reimagining the Orchestra Subscription Model, a nationwide study of subscription trends over the last 10 years conducted by the League in partnership with the global consulting firm Oliver Wyman, using data provided by member orchestras.


In our 2016 fiscal year, the League is focused on leading its members in collectively advancing, articulating, and advocating for the essential experience that only orchestras can provide. A new initiative in 2016 is the Ford Musician Awards for Excellence in Community Service, a program that will recognize the contributions of five musicians demonstrating the highest standards of community service. Other upcoming activities include the Bruno Walter National Conductor Preview, which has become a launching pad for many gifted young conductors and will give up to six participants the opportunity to conduct sessions with the Nashville Symphony in May 2016, and the League’s 71st National Conference in Baltimore in June 2016.

Needs

The League is the one national organization that serves the universally shared interests, needs, and values of orchestras, helping them achieve what they cannot achieve alone. Over the past several years, the League’s work has helped the field evolve and change. Orchestras throughout the country are experiencing a moment of great possibility. Never before have orchestras embraced the opportunities presented by their current environment with such vigor and ingenuity: the rate of experimentation is at an all-time high. Orchestras are reexamining their missions and placing a greater emphasis on public impact, with a view toward fusing excellence and engagement, fostering creativity and creating community value, and understanding repertoire as a continuum of new and old.

 
More than ever, they are looking to the League for leadership, guidance, and as a partner to help them identify and implement strategies that will lead them to greater sustainability and vitality. In response, the League has tailored its programs to help orchestras address their most critical issues and adapt to new market realities. Priority areas include strengthening leadership; advancing artistic vitality; generating knowledge; informing the field; and creating and communicating public value.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Music
Areas Served
National
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
Programs
Description

The League offers a variety of seminars, fellowships, mentoring circles, webinars, and meetings through which orchestra staff, board members, musicians, and volunteers can build valuable leadership skills to address their orchestras' short- and long-term challenges and evaluate and improve governance practice. The League’s annual National Conference offers additional opportunities for professional development while providing a forum to discuss emerging issues and trends, exchange ideas, and model possible solutions to common problems.

Population Served US / Adults /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The League’s anticipated outcome for all of its programmatic work is for orchestra leaders to use the learning and information gained through participation to inform their decision-making and apply new practices in their orchestras.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Through all of its programs and services, the League aims to strengthen orchestras’ capacity to more fully engage with the communities in which they exist.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The League is committed to conducting candid and thorough assessments of all of its programs to ensure that resources are being allocated as efficiently and effectively as possible. It solicits quantitative and qualitative feedback from those who directly participate in its programs and use its services. Surveys and evaluation forms provide data that help determine whether particular programs are meeting goals and members’ expectations and how to adjust them in a changing environment. League Board committees provide oversight and review progress on goals, and field constituent groups, advisory committees and councils, and ad hoc task forces offer feedback on League activity.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

This year, the League and the University of Southern California established a new strategic partnership to develop future orchestra leaders. The League, in association with USC’s Arts Leadership program, presented Essentials of Orchestra Management in Los Angeles for the first time, from July 7-16, 2015. Thirty-one new and aspiring orchestra professionals (selected through competitive application) participated in the 2015 Essentials program—an intense, highly interactive course in running a fiscally sound and artistically vibrant orchestra in the 21st century.

 

Additionally, six men and women under the age of 35 continued to participate in the League’s two-year Emerging Leaders Program, designed to train and support the next generation of orchestra leaders. Now in their second and final year, participants from Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Eastern Connecticut Symphony Orchestra, Houston Symphony, Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra (FL), and San Francisco Symphony, have been applying their improved skills by leading a specific project designed to benefit their orchestras and the communities they serve. These projects are providing the cross-functional training that is essential to securing senior leadership positions within the orchestral field. 

 
Description

The League's print and digital publications, including Symphony magazine, SymphonyOnline, and The Hub, play a critical role in informing orchestra leaders about new knowledge and practice. Orchestra leaders are also invited to participate in online discussion groups, a confidential space where they can share their extensive knowledge and learn about best practices throughout the field.

Population Served US / Adults /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

The League’s anticipated outcome for all of its programmatic work is for orchestra leaders to use the learning and information gained through participation to inform their decision-making and apply new practices in their orchestras.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Through all of its programs and services, the League aims to strengthen orchestras’ capacity to more fully engage with the communities in which they exist.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The League is committed to conducting candid and thorough assessments of all of its programs to ensure that resources are being allocated as efficiently and effectively as possible. It solicits quantitative and qualitative feedback from those who directly participate in its programs and use its services. Surveys and evaluation forms provide data that help determine whether particular programs are meeting goals and members’ expectations and how to adjust them in a changing environment. League Board committees provide oversight and review progress on goals, and field constituent groups, advisory committees and councils, and ad hoc task forces offer feedback on League activity.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Through the award-winning Symphony magazine, SymphonyOnline (a free digital version of the magazine), and The Hub (a special section of the League’s website), the League serves as the number one source for orchestra-related news and information. These print and digital communications keep orchestra leaders informed and connected, and provide a balance of viewpoints relevant to the field.

Description The League equips orchestras with industry-specific research to fuel innovation and provides the data and information they need to make key decisions.  The League also conducts, analyzes, and disseminates a range of surveys -- from quick questions focusing on specific issues, to annual, in-depth studies.
Population Served US / Adults /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

The League’s anticipated outcome for all of its programmatic work is for orchestra leaders to use the learning and information gained through participation to inform their decision-making and apply new practices in their orchestras.

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Through all of its programs and services, the League aims to strengthen orchestras’ capacity to more fully engage with the communities in which they exist.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The League is committed to conducting candid and thorough assessments of all of its programs to ensure that resources are being allocated as efficiently and effectively as possible. It solicits quantitative and qualitative feedback from those who directly participate in its programs and use its services. Surveys and evaluation forms provide data that help determine whether particular programs are meeting goals and members’ expectations and how to adjust them in a changing environment. League Board committees provide oversight and review progress on goals, and field constituent groups, advisory committees and councils, and ad hoc task forces offer feedback on League activity.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

During the last year, the League has made great strides to better serve as the orchestra field’s primary generator for meaningful, accessible, and actionable knowledge and information. These strides include the reestablishment of a senior leadership position in the Knowledge Center department and the creation and diffusion of new and refined resources. In partnership with the global consulting firm Oliver Wyman, the League conducted a nationwide study of subscription trends over the last 10 years, using data provided by member orchestras. The unprecedented study, titled Reimagining the Orchestra Subscription Model, provides League members and the field at-large with a comprehensive and in-depth analysis of subscription trends and identifies strategies that promote frequency and loyalty. The results were released in early November, followed by two webinars led by Namita Desai, author of the study and a consultant at Oliver Wyman, which reviewed the findings and answered questions for 140 individuals from 104 orchestras

Description The League helps orchestras broaden their role in community, raises public awareness of the value and vitality of orchestras and symphonic music, and fosters conversations on the public role of orchestras with policymakers and others. It also works to impact policy at the federal level, representing orchestras nationwide in a variety of areas, including travel restrictions for musicians whose instruments contain small amounts of ivory, arts and arts education funding, research and policy, visas for foreign guest artists, cultural exchange, and nonprofit tax issues.
Population Served US / Adults /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

The League’s anticipated outcome for all of its programmatic work is for orchestra leaders to use the learning and information gained through participation to inform their decision-making and apply new practices in their orchestras.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Through all of its programs and services, the League aims to strengthen orchestras’ capacity to more fully engage with the communities in which they exist.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The League is committed to conducting candid and thorough assessments of all of its programs to ensure that resources are being allocated as efficiently and effectively as possible. It solicits quantitative and qualitative feedback from those who directly participate in its programs and use its services. Surveys and evaluation forms provide data that help determine whether particular programs are meeting goals and members’ expectations and how to adjust them in a changing environment. League Board committees provide oversight and review progress on goals, and field constituent groups, advisory committees and councils, and ad hoc task forces offer feedback on League activity.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Through its office in Washington, DC, the League continued to work to impact policy at the federal level, representing orchestras nationwide in a variety of areas, including arts and arts education funding, research and policy, visas for foreign guest artists, cultural exchange, and nonprofit tax issues. The League is also in ongoing dialogue with policy leaders to seek both short and long-term solutions that address wildlife conservation goals while also protecting international musical activity that requires musicians to travel across borders with the tools of their trade.

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Jesse Rosen
Term Start July 2008
Email jrosen@americanorchestras.org
Experience

Since becoming President and CEO of the League of American Orchestras in 2008, Jesse Rosen has been a leading voice for change, empowering the League’s 800 member orchestras with knowledge and perspective to navigate their own paths through a rapidly changing environment.

Under Rosen’s leadership, the League has advocated for orchestras’ reinvigorated and deeper engagement with community; greater discipline and understanding of fiscal health; increased use of data to inform decision-making; and widespread engagement with composers. He has increased the League’s impact by building partnerships with organizations such as New Music USA, Board Source, the Thornton School of Music at USC, and the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and has given voice to America’s orchestras through his Huffington Post blog, Symphony magazine column, national media interviews, and international appearances.

During his sixteen-year tenure at the League, Rosen has been instrumental in creating new programs and partnerships in the areas of artistry, leadership development, diversity, governance, capitalization, and community engagement, including Ford Made in America, Music Alive, and Getty Education and Community Investment Grants. Rosen has embraced new technologies, and, under his direction, the League has renewed its focus on hard data, issuing a range of crucial longitudinal studies and reports.

Rosen serves on the board of the American Composers Orchestra, as Vice Chair of the Performing Arts Alliance, and on the Board of Overseers of the Curtis Institute of Music. A lifelong musician and experienced orchestra CEO, Rosen has served as general manager of the Seattle Symphony, executive vice president and managing director of the American Composers Orchestra in New York City, orchestra manager of the New York Philharmonic, and vice president of programs for Affiliate Artists, Inc. A trombonist, Jesse Rosen received his bachelor’s degree from the Manhattan School of Music and pursued graduate studies at The Juilliard School.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 31
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 69%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 4
Caucasian 28
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 2 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 16
Female 19
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Chief Operating Officer
Title Vice President Learning and Leadership Development
Title Vice President for Advocacy
Title Vice President, Strategic Communications
Title Vice President, Knowledge Center
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Board Chair
Ms. Patricia A. Richards
Company Affiliation Retired; Former Senior Vice President and Regional Manager, The Private Bank of Wells Fargo; Chair, Board of Trustees, Utah Symphony | Opera; Board of Trustees, Westminster College, Salt Lake City
Term June 2014 to June 2016
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Burton Alter Director and Board President, New Haven Symphony Orchestra
Ms. Alberta Arthurs Independent Contractor/Commentator in the Arts and Humanities
Mr. Brent Assink Executive Director, San Francisco Symphony
Dr. Malcolm Brown Board Member, Winston-Salem Symphony
Mr. Richard Cisek Former President and CEO, Minnesota Orchestra
Ms. Melanie Clarke Executive Director, Princeton Symphony Orchestra
Mr. Bruce E. Clinton Chairman and CEO, The Clinton Companies
Ms. Gloria dePasquale Cellist, The Philadelphia Orchestra
Ms. Helen DeVos Honorary Member, Executive Board, Grand Rapids Symphony
Mr. Aaron Dworkin Founder and President, Sphinx Organization
Mr. Aaron Flagg Chair and Associate Director, Juilliard Jazz
Ms. Marian Godfrey Retired; Former Senior Director, Pew Charitable Trusts
Mr. Douglas Hagerman Chair, Board of Directors, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
Mr. Jim Hasler Retired, The Clorox Company
Mr. Mark Jung Internet and Mobile Executive Mentor
Ms. Camille LaBarre Managing Director, The Metropolitan Opera
Mr. Robert Levine Principal Violist, Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra
Dr. Hugh Long Board President, Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra
Ms. Kjristine Lund Principal in Charge, Lund Consulting
Mr. Anthony McGill Principal Clarinet, New York Philharmonic
Mr. Alan McIntyre Chairman, Stamford Symphony Orchestra
Mr. David Alan Miller Conductor and Music Director, Albany Symphony Orchestra
Ms. Catherine Moye Owner and Designated Broker, Windermere Real Estate
Mr. Lowell J. Noteboom Partner, Stinson Leonard Street LLP
Mr. Steven C. Parrish Member, Board of Directors, Stamford Symphony Orchestra
Ms. Anne Parsons President and Executive Director, Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Ms. Mary Carr Patton Board of Directors, New York Pops, Inc.
Mr. Robert Peiser Board President, Houston Symphony
Mr. Daniel Petersen Executive Director, Seattle Youth Symphony Orchestra
Mr. Henry Peyrebrune Bassist, Cleveland Orchestra
Mr. Alan Pierson Artistic Director and Conductor, Alarm Will Sound
Mr. Jesse Rosen President and CEO, League of American Orchestras
Mr. Robert Rosoff Retired; Former Executive Director, Glen Falls Symphony Orchestra
Mr. David M. Roth Board Member, Hartford Symphony Orchestra
Mr. Daniel Bernard Roumain Composer, violinist, band-leader, educator, curator, and arts administrator.
Ms. Mary Saathoff Executive Director, Lubbock Symphony
Mr. Barry A. Sanders Former Chairman, Los Angeles Philharmonic
Ms. Cynthia M. Sargent Trustee, Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Ms. Helen Shaffer Board Member, Houston Symphony
Ms. Pratichi Shah President and CEO, Flourish Talent Management Solutions
Ms. Penny Van Horn Trustee, Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Mr. Matthew VanBesien President, New York Philharmonic
Mr. Robert J. Wagner Principal Bassoonist, New Jersey Symphony Orchestra
Mr. Albert K. Webster Board Member, American Composers Orchestra
Mr. Jonathan Weedman Senior VP, Wells Fargo Foundation
Ms. Linda Weisbruch President, Volunteer Council, League of American Orchestras
Mr. Simon Woods President and CEO, Seattle Symphony
Ms. Wendy Young Executive Director, Symphonicity
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 42
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 2 Indian/Other
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 31
Female 18
Unspecified 0
Standing Committees
Audit
Board Governance
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Human Resources / Personnel
Investment
Membership
Program / Program Planning
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01 2015
Fiscal Year End June 30 2016
Projected Revenue $5,407,817.00
Projected Expenses $5,403,755.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 5%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$2,754,410$1,990,233$4,678,503
Government Contributions$133,260$160,500$138,405
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$133,260$160,500$138,405
Individual Contributions------
------
$646,025$650,967$875,275
Investment Income, Net of Losses$88,393$87,458$84,300
Membership Dues$1,682,318$1,742,568$1,726,142
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$12,138$24,236$31,138
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$4,073,428$4,273,514$4,190,915
Administration Expense$662,752$924,063$1,237,336
Fundraising Expense$769,844$692,100$841,522
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.970.791.20
Program Expense/Total Expenses74%73%67%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue27%32%17%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$7,975,780$8,066,663$8,908,362
Current Assets$2,668,703$3,208,007$4,345,351
Long-Term Liabilities$219,084$205,084$177,415
Current Liabilities$581,238$939,972$1,039,672
Total Net Assets$7,175,458$6,921,607$7,691,275
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Andrew W. Mellon Foundation $500,000The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation $500,000Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation $1,657,500
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Richard & Helen Devos Foundation $400,000Metlife Foundation $160,000The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation $552,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Clinton Family Fund $250,000National Endowment for the Arts $140,000The Richards and Helen Devos Foundation $500,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities4.593.414.18
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets3%3%2%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 33 W. 60th Street
5th Floor
New York, NY 100237905
Primary Phone 212 822-4050
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jesse Rosen
Board Chair Ms. Patricia A. Richards
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired; Former Senior Vice President and Regional Manager, The Private Bank of Wells Fargo; Chair, Board of Trustees, Utah Symphony | Opera; Board of Trustees, Westminster College, Salt Lake City

 

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