Almada Lodge - Times Farm Camp Corporation
73 Times Farm Road
Andover CT 06232
Contact Information
Address 73 Times Farm Road
Andover, CT 06232-
Telephone (860) 742-2267 x
Fax 860-742-3298
E-mail info@channel3kidscamp.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The mission of Channel 3 Kids Camp is to provide fun year round-opportunities to children of all abilities, families, & communities through educational & recreational programs that promote diversity, acceptance and environmental appreciation.

 
A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.

Holiday Light Fantasia is  Channel 3 Kids Camp's largest annual fundraiser. The 2-mile show transforms Hartford's Goodwin Park into a drive-through wonderland of holiday spirit with a beautiful collection of over 1 million lights set to a special holiday soundtrack. Whimsical holiday scenes, familiar characters and local tributes shine bright in larger-than-life lighted scenes and 200 individual displays. Lighted animations celebrate not only Christmas, but Hanukkah, New Years, and Three Kings Day.

 
The event runs nightly (unless snow/ice cause unsafe conditions) from Thanksgiving through New Year's Day from 5-9pm Sunday-Thursday and 5-10pm on Friday & Saturday nights. Volunteers are critical to the success of this event, from the teams that help replace light bulbs in displays during the weeks before it opens to assisting our staff and board members with greeting visitors and running the event in the evenings. Event sponsors help defray the cost of Holiday Light Fantasia so that ticket costs ($15 per passenger car) go directly to fund programs offered at Channel 3 Kids Camp.  

This holiday tradition welcomed over 90,000 visitors last year! We look forward to welcoming even more supporters throughout the lighted celebration from November 23, 2017 through January 1 2018.

A Great Opportunity Ending Date Jan 01 2018
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1937
Former Names
Channel 3 Country Camp
Times Farm Camp
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Denise K. Hornbecker
Board Chair Ms. Jillian G. Wood
Board Chair Company Affiliation Managing Partner, GW Association Management Solutions
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $2,265,895.00
Projected Expenses $2,019,184.00
Statements
Mission

The mission of Channel 3 Kids Camp is to provide fun year round-opportunities to children of all abilities, families, & communities through educational & recreational programs that promote diversity, acceptance and environmental appreciation.

 
Background

The Harrison B. Freeman family, in collaboration with the Union for Home Work in Hartford, began its tradition of providing a summer camping experience for city children at their summer home, the Almada Lodge in 1910. In 1920, the Hartford Times assumed full responsibility for the program. In 1931, the Freeman family and the Hartford Times deeded the camp over to a newly formed charitable corporation, The Almada Lodge-Times Farm Camp Corporation, known as the Times Farm Camp. In 1976 when the Hartford Times ceased publication, WFSB Channel 3 stepped forward to serve as the camp’s media partner. While WFSB has been a dedicated media partner for over 40 years providing invaluable exposure and public awareness, WFSB does not own, nor pay the Camp's expenses. Almada Lodge-Times Farm Camp Corporation, a 501(c) 3 corporation, is in its 107th year. During that time, we have consistently and successfully offered a camping experience for children and youth throughout our region from a variety of backgrounds. The camp has grown from serving 20 campers in 1910 to serving nearly 3,000 children year-round on our 150 acre campus located in Andover and Coventry. In 2014 we completed construction and opened Ashley’s Place, a fully accessible, dorm style cabin with 24 hour nursing support that has enabled us to include hundreds of children with special needs among our typically developing campers. The 3 primary principles of inclusion are: Every child can participate; every child can make a friend; every child can succeed. With bond support for ADA improvements from the State of CT and foundation grants, we also replaced our inaccessible and broken down playground, our pool/shower house and paved our dirt roadways.  We opened a childcare center with preschool curriculum that is growing to capacity. We have a dedicated Board of Directors that provides governance and support to our Chief Executive Officer and leadership staff. 100% of our Board members contribute financially and through volunteer time to events and activities. Volunteers play an integral role in fundraising and camp operations, including those who come to help with spring and fall camp cleanup projects, help staff our fundraising events, and those who provide their expertise in our programs. We are fortunate to have more than 300 volunteers each year.

Impact

Accomplishments: We made a large number of facility upgrades in 2014 and 2015, positioning us well to accommodate our new inclusive population. In 2016 we renovated and expanded our high & low ropes challenge course with zip line, improving accessibility, and brought in an experienced adventure learning program manager. The ropes course has become one of the most popular physical and team building activities during summer camp. We have grown in year round numbers from serving 1707 in 2013 to serving 2518 in 2016, an increase of 47%. The weekend respite program begun in 2014 grew from 10 monthly participants to 30 in 2016, an increase of 200%, with increasing referrals from DCF.

 

Goals: Continue to grow enrollment and capacity in the year-round preschool program and weekend respite program; Raise the remainder of the necessary funds for and complete the renovation of the camp’s Recreation Hall to improve safety and accessibility and increase programming capacity; build awareness and utilization of the camp and its facilities to schools, community groups, scouting and religious organizations for adventure learning field days, retreats and other weekend rental opportunities, further diversifying and increasing revenue. We look forward to serving more children of all abilities throughout the year and continuing to provide outstanding educational and recreational experiences.

Needs

 * The camp Recreation Hall, built in 1937, needs major renovation for accessibility, safety & improved service delivery. It is not insulated or heated thus can’t be used year-round; its stage is inaccessible. It houses our performing & visual media arts programs and library, provides a covered space for other activities in bad weather & is used for training and meetings in summer. Significant renovation will make the building entirely accessible, usable year-round, & double non-summer program space. Cost: $178,088.

* Continue renovation of Turn Lodge, which holds our kitchen, dining hall & restrooms. Windows were replaced in 2016 but doors and flooring need replacing. As we serve more children yearly its kitchen needs to be expanded. Cost: $370,000

* Wheelchair accessible van. We get many requests to transport children with disabilities. Vehicle should accommodate 4 wheelchairs/16 seated passengers & be used year-round. Cost: $71,192.

* Ramp/resurface the pool built in 1963. Existing plaster has significantly degraded & causes scrapes to 15-20 children daily. It is inaccessible. Cost: $128,840

* Build/equip a laundry facility/training room with 4 commercial washers & dryers, 160 lockers to secure personal belongings & staff training room. Cost: $409,889.

CEO Statement

Founded in 1910, The Channel 3 Kids Camp is one of oldest and most respected nonprofit children’s organizations in Connecticut. Supported by a dedicated Board of Directors and creative professional staff, we have the experience and stability to develop, implement, evaluate and sustain innovative programs that break from cookie-cutter models and are based on the unique needs of children. The Camp serves nearly 3,000 children each year at our 150 acre campus in Andover and Coventry, CT. We have always been committed to improving the quality of life for children, rooting our efforts in educational and recreational programming in accordance with our mission statement. Since its inception, programs have focused on helping children develop personally and socially. We foster the skills necessary for personal, social, and career-related success. These skills include character development, interpersonal skills, life skills, health-related behaviors, conflict resolution skills, communication skills and leadership skills. With our teens, community volunteerism encourages civic participation and cooperation, while nurturing skills such as leadership and management. We are excited to have become a camp for children of all abilities; it has been a longtime goal. If a child with disabilities can go to school alongside a child without, the same should be true for camp. As we have evolved as an inclusive organization, we now operate a licensed preschool program and offer weekend respite for families of children with special needs. This not only supports our mission, but allows us to be operational year round. We are now not only a camp but an educational recreation center where children learn, grow and play in an inclusive environment where every child can participate; every child can make a friend; and every child can succeed.

Board Chair Statement

I have recently been elected as Board President for the Channel 3 Kids Camp, and I am looking forward to the next two years. Working with the CEO, Denise Hornbecker and her staff, we expect a truly successful run. While it feels good to be a part of a well-run organization, it feels even better to be involved with one that makes such a significant difference to children who need a magical place to be a kid.

For over 100 years, we have encouraged kids to spend time in the country, enjoying an experience that they might not have at any other time in their lives. They smell fresh air, play outside in a safe environment, and learn to swim, swing on ropes, and engage with kids who may not be just like them. We more recently have been able to extend that same opportunity to children with special health care needs, or those who might benefit from a setting and a staff who can care for them and their requirements. Our camp gives kids and their families a little bit of hope. And with hope, you can do anything.

Through Denise's and the Board's leadership, the camp has over the past five years made physical improvements including new building construction, building renovation and multiple accessibility upgrades--all without undertaking a formal capital campaign. Additionally, the reserve fund has been re-established, currently holding $100,000. 

Our Board of Directors and volunteers are dedicated and amazingly enthusiastic. It is an honor to work side-by-side with them on events and activities at the camp. The staff of C3KC is unbelievably passionate towards the campers and the facility. They lean in, every day, and it shows. The smiles on the children are the gifts they receive.

I invite anyone to come to the camp to see the activity and bustle for yourself. Visit our website, or attend one of our events. I am very pleased to be the Board President of a nonprofit organization that changes the lives of children for the better.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Recreation & Sports / Camps
Secondary Organization Category Environment / Environmental Education
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge

We serve children from across the state of Connecticut, with 17% of participants coming from The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven/Valley Community Foundations’ service area over the past 3 years. We offer a special camp week each summer in partnership with the National Military Family Association for children from active military families. There is no CT residency requirement for that week, but the majority of those campers are from CT. School groups from across CT, MA and NY come during the school year for the Nature’s Classroom residential environmental education program.

 
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Channel 3 Kids Camp provides year-round, structured & inclusive out of school programming for children of all abilities that addresses social & educational skill building. Learning is part of a complex & ongoing developmental process that continues outside the classroom. Out-of-school time is important for children. Success in school & in life requires more than math & English. Knowledge in subjects such as science & technology, communication, & problem solving as well as social competence in developing relationships with those diverse backgrounds, are some of the skills that children must learn in order to succeed in life. School year programs include Respite Weekends for children with special needs, Teen Leadership, Nature's Classroom, and our Open Arms childcare center that offers a preschool curriculum and quality childcare from 7:30am-5:30pm.   

Programs
Description

Overnight & Day camp provide a retreat for Connecticut boys & girls ages 6-13 (up to 21 with special needs) & include children of all abilities. 150 acres provide a care-free environment for a summer of new friendships, play & the outdoors. Activities are hands on & include swim lessons, archery, arts & crafts, performing arts, gardening, visual media arts, hiking, orienteering, ropes challenge course, nature exploration & more. Visiting educational programs vary each summer. The program serves 85 day & up to 200 overnight campers weekly. A 6:1 camper/staff ratio (as low as 3:1 overnight) ensures strong supervision & support. The camp experience helps broaden social skills, promote independence & build confidence.  Beyond the social benefits, youth develop increased awareness of the relationship between people & nature. The inclusive model teaches appreciation & respect diversity, & to understand that regardless of ability, all can participate.

Population Served General/Unspecified / At-Risk Populations / People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
The following is a summary of reports submitted for summer 2016 by activity leaders & counselors:

· 75% demonstrated improved self-confidence

· 90% showed improved focus and follow through

· 80% tried new activities/took positive risks

· 40% showed improvement in working as part of a team

· 30% showed improvement in time management/organization

· 50% demonstrated improved peer relationships

· 70% showed improvement in peaceful conflict resolution

· 60% demonstrated improved self-respect/respect to others

· 80% improved at following directions

· 80% showed overall enthusiasm & happiness throughout the camp week.

 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
  • Children learn to work and play together and to accept and respect differences.
  • Youth are inspired to develop life-long skills through educational and personal development opportunities
  •  
  • Reduction of youth violence and the adoption of alternative dispute resolution methods.
  •  
  • The discovery of hidden talents and abilities and the overcoming of challenges that foster a feeling of self-reliance and increased self-esteem.

 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Self assessments (in questionnaire form) by each camper at beginning and end of week; staff assessments of campers at end of week. Parent surveys are done electronically at the end of each session. Parental participation in survey completion, while at times challenging, continues to grow. We see stronger participation from families of kids with special needs than with typical children.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

99% of Counselors in Training (CITs) and participants in the Teen Leadership program are past campers.

More than half of our campers return for multiple summers.

88% of parents responding to surveys say our program exceeds their expectations for their child. One parent wrote “My son Danny has had a rough time making friends due to how much we’ve moved around, and has been a victim of bullying for many years. I removed him from a free day program in our town due to bullying, & wasn’t sure where he could go. Danny’s time at Channel 3 Kids Camp made me cry tears of joy. The staff and his fellow campers made a huge difference to him. This camp has given my son laughter, joy and friends-he even wants to be a camp counselor. Without your financial assistance I would not have been able to pay for Danny’s last 2 weeks. I couldn’t take time off from my job to care for him without putting at risk our hard fought achievements this year. I can’t tell you how much this means to my family & me.”

 

Description

The Nature's Classroom environmental studies program gives 5 day experiences at camp year round. NC’s focus is the outdoor environment. This unique experience for students & teachers lets students take an active role in education by participating in exciting hands-on interdisciplinary classes. After a week of living & learning together, students develop a sense of community, confidence in themselves & an appreciation for others that carries over to their school life. Strengthened peer cooperation & student-teacher relationships influence the cognitive growth of the students throughout the school year. Together, they return to the classroom united through this shared experience to achieve the common goal of the pursuit of knowledge. Our 150 wooded acres, including the Skungamaug River, provide a week of wonder.

Population Served General/Unspecified / K-12 (5-19 years) / Adults
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Demonstrated motivation and enthusiasm for specific subjects and exposure/understanding of the outdoors.  Students return to the classroom more engaged in experiential learning and more environmentally aware.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. 65 percent of schools return year after year, some for the entire 29 years we have offered Nature's Classroom. Students gain experiential knowledge in biology, chemistry, physics, nature and field study.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Weekly self and teacher evaluations via questionnaire.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
High return rate of school groups year after year. Increased number of schools wishing to participate in Nature's Classroom. Letters of appreciation from teachers.
 
Description

Teen Leaders attend a 4-week session during the summer and 8 weekends during the school year. We provide them with personal, social & recreation programs in an environment that enhances personal & social skills, teaches leadership & responsibility, & promotes self-esteem. We’ve added reading & financial literacy to their activities. We empower teens to make a difference in their communities. By volunteering, they learn the good in helping others. We help teens prepare for college & future careers with guest speakers & visits to local colleges. Our teens act as camp ambassadors at events like the WFSB telethon. After 2 years they are eligible to become counselors in training. CITs receive a stipend & take on additional responsibilities with younger campers. Many go on to become full summer counselors; most go on to college or a certificate program. Thanks to the donation of 2 new cabins we can now accommodate 28 teen leaders in each 4-week session, up from 15 previously (86% increase).

Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / General/Unspecified / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
75% of Teen Leaders enter the Counselor in Training (CIT) program. Teen Leaders become more active in their own communities during the school year.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The vast majority of participants in the Teen Leadership program go on to college. Camp staff remain in contact with these teens throughout the year to encourage continued involvement in community service activities. Between the time they first come to camp as children and leave for college, we are in touch with this group on an ongoing basis for 8 to 10 years.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
ongoing contact and assessment of teens in program via self and staff evaluation forms after weekends spent here. Parental evaluations after summer and throughout school year.
 
We look for participants in this program by looking at our campers for nascent leadership qualities and behavior, engagement in camp programs and ability to work in an integrated way with others. We look for their ability to problem solve individually and collaboratively.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

We continue to develop Teen Leaders with interest in our buddy system that pairs them with a camper with special needs to mentor & assist in activities. This system teaches the Teens/CITs patience, encouragement, & how to help others build self-confidence while trying new activities throughout camp. A success story is the pairing last summer of JoEva, a 14 year old Teen Leader, with 10 year old Preston, who is nonverbal & has multiple developmental disabilities. What these two did the most together was play. Preston was always excited to see JoEva, and eager to spend time with her. They were frequently observed in a variety of activities together including playing ball games, tag and hide-&-seek. JoEva developed a great deal of patience and caring for Preston over the course of the summer. While nonverbal, Preston grew more vocal in her presence, as time together helped her to more easily understand his efforts to communicate with her and others. It was a win-win for both campers.

Description

Open Arms Childcare Center is inclusive and welcomes children ages 15 months-5 years. The center is open 7:30 to 5:30 year-round (except major holidays) and priced affordably at just $200 per week. The fully licensed and insured center includes a full preschool curriculum at no additional cost and is licensed for 19 children. It began operations in fall 2015. Unique about the center is the access it has to all of the camp grounds; the children spend a large amount of time outdoors, even in the winter!

Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / People/Families with of People with Disabilities / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

We measure our success by setting goals, watching, and evaluating the children each and every day. When they arrive, we evaluate the children by playing different games and other activities which allow us to see if they can count, recognize and put numbers in order, sing the alphabet, recognize the letters in their names, sort objects, and name colors and shapes. As we watch the children form friendships they learn to share and take turns, participate in large and small group activities, and follow simple directions. Sample outcomes: Upon arrival 33% of 3-year-olds can demonstrate self-readiness for activity transition. After four weeks that doubles to 66%. 50% can recognize & recite numbers 1-10; after four weeks it’s 75%. None of our children under 2 (new in fall 2016) could recognize or arrange the letters of their name correctly; four weeks in 90% can.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Children coming into the program by age 3 leave kindergarten ready at the end of two years in the program. 100% of children participate in experiential learning, age appropriate reading development, social development and activities that help them begin learning team building and personal responsibility. This program began with 4 children in September 2015 and is nearly full. Our two 2016 graduates are now in kindergarten, replaced in the program by younger siblings.  As this is still a fairly new program, the primary goal is to provide the structure, curriculum and experiences that will make all children who enter at age 3 (and depending on the individual child, as many at age 4 as possible) kindergarten ready by age 5. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

 A child who started with us at age 3 had a lot of anxiety and was extremely shy. She would burst into tears when anyone new tried to talk to her or if we tried an activity she wasn’t familiar or comfortable with. In our center we have unique opportunities to take the children on hikes through the woods, engage in special activities with other camp staff & children, and give the children the chance to try new things. This was particularly difficult for this little girl. She needed continued reassurance that she was safe and we would take care of her. Now, she is now one of the first children to greet a visitor who comes to our class. She helps to reassure and comfort the younger children when we take a hike, an activity that at first was very scary to her. It is amazing to see her social skills blossoming right before our eyes. She will move on to kindergarten in the fall instilled with a new sense of confidence that will enable a smoother transition into her new school.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

We have a child who started with us at age 3. She had a lot of anxiety and was extremely shy. She would burst into tears when anyone new tried to talk to her or if we tried an activity she wasn’t familiar or comfortable with. In our center we have unique opportunities to take the children on hikes through the woods, engage in special activities with other camp staff and children, and give the children the chance to try new things. This was particularly difficult for this little girl. She needed continued reassurance that she was safe and we would take care of her. Now, she is now one of the first children to greet a new guest who comes to our class. She also helps to reassure and comfort the younger children when we take a hike; an activity that at first was very scary to her. It is amazing to see her social skills blossoming right before our eyes. She will move on to kindergarten in the fall and I am very proud of the confidence we have instilled in her allowing for a smoother transition into her new school.

Description

Monthly respite weekends provide a safe, recreational getaway for children with special needs and provide what is often a much needed break for their family caregivers. The program runs September through May for children 3 and up who have physical and/or developmental needs. They are a mini-retreat for campers with activities including arts & crafts, baking, nature walks, team building, games and more. Respite weekends focus on independence and socialization for youth while providing their families the comfort of knowing their child will be well cared-for in a safe and nurturing environment. Program provides 24 hour nursing care along with staff trained and experienced in areas of special needs care. The weekend runs from 5pm Fridays until 1pm on Sundays with meals & accommodations included.

Respite weekends are held simultaneously with Teen Leadership weekends to provide maximum opportunities for inclusive activities and peer support and encouragement.  
 
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

40% of regular respite participants are able to participate in a social group successfully.

75% of respite campers learn while how to read directions, measurements and work as teams by participating in cooking/baking activities.

5% of regular participants demonstrate a reduced need for behavior related medication.

25% of respite participants continue with behavior plans from school and home to ensure success

50% of Respite staff have participated and completed PPMT training (Physical/Psychological Management training) to ensure staff use techniques of de-escalation for both children with special needs and those in DCF foster care.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. For families of children with special needs, the need for respite does not go away as the child gets older. Long term success for us is shown in the number of families who continue to utilize this program for respite;  in the gains their child makes in independence, decision making and socialization, and through increased referrals by DDS and DCF workers who see the benefits to both child and family through the program.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Parent evaluations show that overwhelmingly, they feel their child is in a safe environment, is increasingly willing to spend time away from home (showing independence) and has improved self-esteem. We are revising parent/caregiver evaluations now that we serve a larger number of DCF involved children to better reflect positive behavioral changes. The Program Director is in regular contact with families on each child's progress and challenges. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Participation has increased 200% since we began this program. Success story: Natalie is 18 years old & has been diagnosed with Fragile X Syndrome as well as Autism Spectrum Disorder. Her parents had never spent a night away from her. Her behavior is challenging. She climbs on tables, tears books & if left alone at meals will grab other people’s food. In September 2015, Natalie began respite weekends. With 1:1 support, while it was rough at first the staff learned behavior modification methods to help ensure her success. That summer Natalie attended 3 camp weeks & her parents were took their first vacation in 18 years. Natalie loves the pool & being outside. She loves to take walks, helps to plant flowers here & enjoys working in the soil. Natalie has not missed one respite weekend since. Her parents look forward to monthly respite. They use many strategies that have worked here, at home. She will attend 7 weeks of camp this year; her family has already booked a summer vacation.

 

 

Program Comments
CEO Comments

The target age demographic for overnight camp is age 8-13 (up to 21 with special needs). That was not an available choice on the drop down menu. Serving children with special needs is more expensive for us due to the need for lower staffing ratio and nursing care. The cost of a camp week for a typical child exceeded $850 last year primarily due to rising food costs--most of our families pay as little as $125. For children with disabilities requiring the smaller staff to camper ratio and medical care provided at Ashley's Place, the actual cost per camper is up to $3300/wk; most families pay $975 (less than the few other camp programs for children with disabilities). We are the only overnight camp in Connecticut to serve children of all physical, developmental and financial abilities together. Inclusion is now a part of our year round programming. Our childcare center is the most affordable in the area for local families, with a 7:30-5:30 school day (if parents wish) at no additional cost. It is nearing capacity. The respite weekend program has grown 200% since its beginning in 2014. These new programs and the income from Nature’s Classroom help to diversify our funding sources and improve year round cash flow.

CEO/Executive Director
Mrs. Denise K. Hornbecker
Term Start June 2007
Email d.hornbecker@channel3kidscamp.org
Experience

Denise K. Hornbecker was named as Executive Director of the Channel 3 Kids Camp in June 2007 and promoted to Chief Executive Officer in 2014. She began work immediately upon her arrival toward necessary facility upgrades. She initiated and oversaw rebuilding of the 100 plus year old campus including a septic & water system replacement project of $1.4 million dollars and the refurbishing of four buildings. Working with the Board of Directors, a major donor and the support of numerous grants, she oversaw design & construction of four new buildings, resulting in doubling the organization's assets and created the ability to serve twice as many children throughout the year. Among her accomplishments, Mrs. Hornbecker diversified funding streams to include year round sustainable programming, spearheaded an inclusive model for all programs and increased contributed income by 300%. She implemented a plan for marketing the 100 year old program to include all facets under one brand identity, recruited and educated board members to adopt a giving policy and brought in an authority on strategic planning to help move the staff and board into a culture of partnership. Under her leadership, Channel 3 Kids Camp has become the only overnight camp in Connecticut to accept children regardless of physical, developmental or financial ability. She recently joined the board of the CT Community Nonprofit Alliance. Prior to joining Channel 3 Kids Camp, Mrs. Hornbecker spent the previous decade at Easter Seals Connecticut-Rhode Island, Inc., where she was Vice President of Development and Public Affairs and Chief Development Officer. She was responsible for the organization’s program marketing, external communications, individual & corporate giving, grant writing, special events, planned giving, endowment, annual report & website. She served as the Secretary of the Northeast Region Easter Seals Leadership Association and was the Northeast Regional Development Leader.


pasting
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 14
Number of Part Time Staff 82
Number of Volunteers 300
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 90%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 26
Asian American/Pacific Islander 3
Caucasian 48
Hispanic/Latino 13
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 3 (Biracial or multiracial)
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 47
Female 43
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr. Daniel Andrews Jan 2001 - June 2003
Mr. Robert Burrows Jan 2003 - June 2007
Senior Staff
Title Director of Programs
Experience/Biography

Alycia Williams joined Channel 3 Kids Camp in November 2013 as Inclusion Director and was promoted to Director of Programs in late 2014. She was previously the Camp Director for  Easter Seals Camp Hemlocks and has experience in working with with both children and adults with varying developmental and physical disabilities. Through her positon as Director she was in large part responsible for the camp's marketing presentations,grant writing, outcome measurement,budget planning and implementation of overall programming. That same year she received the President's Award through Easter Seals NH and CT. She also served as the camp's groups rental manager as well as Director of Youth and Aquatics programs for children throughout New London and Tolland counties.

Alycia was Director of Childcare, Youth and Aquatics programming at the YMCA of Southeastern Connecticut from 1998 to 2007. Her roles there also included Camp Director of YMCA Camp Anderson in North Stonington CT for low income families in New London County.

Title Chief Financial Officer
Experience/Biography

Donna L. Basler joined Channel 3 Kids Camp as Chief Financial Officer in 2014. Donna brings more than 20 years of financial management experience to the organization. Before joining the camp she was the Director of Finance and Administration for AIDS Connecticut (formerly AIDS Project Hartford) for seven years and Accountant for InterCommunity Mental Health Group for four years. Donna served as Treasurer of First Congregational Church in East Hartford from 1998-March 2017. Her financial management expertise has been a tremendous asset as the organization grows. Donna has been a member of the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers for over 20 years and previously owned her own bookkeeping firm.

Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

Our newest collaboration is with support from the CT Police Chiefs’ Association which is providing funding to allow us to partner with New Haven’s Believe in Me Empowerment Corporation. We will look to serve a minimum of 25 children who have a parent who is incarcerated in summer camp. We work with the following organizations to recruit campers/school groups: Nature's Classroom; Wheeler Clinic; CT Dept. of Children & Families; CT Alliance of Foster & Adoptive Families; CT Dept. of Developmental Services, CT Bureau of Rehabilitation Services/BESB; National Military Family Association; CT National Guard Office of Family Support, Manchester & East Hartford Youth Service Bureaus, The Epilepsy Foundation and American Academy of Dermatology (children with skin disorders), Miracle League of CT, Jett Foundation's Camp Promise and the CT Family Support Network. We conduct active outreach to parent groups of children with disabilities and have worked with Autism Families of CT and CT Autism Services & Resources. Outreach to additional disabilities specific organizations, schools and youth service bureaus continues statewide.

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits2009
Connecticut Community Nonprofit Alliance2016
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Outstanding Service to Military FamiliesConnecticut National Guard2013
Comments
CEO Comments
In evaluating our staffing, please note that 4 part time employees are year round and 81 are seasonal (June-August). We include both full and part time employees in determining our demographic breakdown.
Board Chair
Ms. Jillian G. Wood
Company Affiliation Managing Partner, GW Association Management Solutions
Term Mar 2017 to Mar 2018
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Dr. Anton Alerte Pediatrician-Burgdorf Pediatric Primary Care Center
Mr. Kevin Brown Mohegan Sun/Mohegan Tribal Council
Mr. Michael F. Collins Eastern Connecticut Health Network
Mr. Klarn DePalma General Manager, WFSB Channel 3
Ms. Molly Devanney Highland Park Markets
Mr. Douglas Evans Kroll McNamara Evans & Delehanty, LLP
Mr. Ed Havens President, Imperial Oil Company
Mr. Ronnell A. Higgins Yale University
Mr. John Holt Nutmeg State Financial Credit Union
Mrs. Denise K Hornbecker Channel 3 Kids Camp
Mr. Michael Kolakowski KBE Building Corporation
Ms. Bettye Jo Pakulis State of Connecticut
Mr. Ron Perine Mintz & Hoke
Mr. Matt Rich Rich Financial Services, LLC
Mrs. Jan Rodrigue Rodco Machine
Mr. Carlos Rosario Community Health Services
Mr. Scott Siedor Robinson & Cole, LLP
Ms. Laura Soll-Broxterman Laura Soll Public Relations LLC
Mr. Greg Thomas Creative Services Director, WFSB Ch 3
Mr. Steve Toffolon Managing Director, March USA Inc.
Mr. Wilson Vega Vice President, Field Operations, Global Imaging Systems
Ms. Jillian G. Wood American Academy of Pediatrics, CT Chapter
Ms. Hyacinth Yennie Community Volunteer
Mr. John Zahner Edward Jones
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 18
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 1
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 17
Female 7
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Boiler and Machinery
Builders Risk
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Commercial General Liability and Medical Malpractice
Computer Equipment and Software
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability
Employment Practices Liability
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Fiduciary Liability
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Professional Liability
Property in Transit and Off Premises
Risk Management Provisions
Special Event Liability
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Blanket Personal Property
Business Income
Crime Coverage
Educators Errors and Omission Liability
Employee Dishonesty
General Property Coverage
Internet Liability Insurance
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workplace Violence
Standing Committees
Board Development / Board Orientation
Executive
Program / Program Planning
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Finance
Campus Planning and Development
CEO Comments
Through the leadership of our Chief Executive Officer and Board of Directors, we have moved to more stable financial footing, less dependent on contributed income (though that will always be important to us) and more self-reliant. Board members have brought personal and business relationships to the table to make this vision a reality. There are arguably few boards of nonprofit organizations our size that are as active in leadership, guidance and procurement of financial resources as dedicated and energetic as ours. They have rebuilt the reserve fund, completely depleted by unanticipated construction cost overruns in 2013-14, to $100,000 and it continues to grow.
One of our board members, Ed Havens, was a camper in the 1930's. He has remained involved with the camp ever since and joined the board as an adult (currently a youthful age 93). He is a tremendous example of the dedication our campers, teen leaders and board members have to the organization.
 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $2,265,895.00
Projected Expenses $2,019,184.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$394,326$661,512$902,749
Government Contributions$152,133$1,138,436$695,700
Federal------
State--$1,078,000$670,912
Local------
Unspecified$152,133$60,436$24,788
Individual Contributions$735$332$355
------
$796,663$586,036$443,834
Investment Income, Net of Losses$2--($2,500)
Membership Dues------
Special Events$27,383$40,594$45,360
Revenue In-Kind$64,721----
Other$525,983$406,943$466,139
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$1,497,487$1,412,443$1,595,210
Administration Expense$351,812$362,863$330,034
Fundraising Expense$352,290$405,784$284,094
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.861.301.15
Program Expense/Total Expenses68%65%72%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue61%22%17%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$4,861,377$5,052,293$4,322,328
Current Assets$364,203$295,291$171,639
Long-Term Liabilities$1,558,294$1,097,210$762,791
Current Liabilities$133,405$116,858$374,078
Total Net Assets$3,533,861$3,838,225$3,185,459
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --DCF $81,000DSS $591,367
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --CT Dept. of Social Service $997,000Hartford Foundation for Public Giving $225,086
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --KBE Building Corp. $112,860
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.732.530.46
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets32%22%18%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments

Our Board finance committee and staff met monthly in 2016 to strategize and review the financial statements.  This new schedule allowed for more interaction between the staff and board in understanding unexpected occurrences as they happened. 2016 was the first year in the past decade that no major renovations took place. The one exception were two new larger cabins that were built and donated by Lowe's Home Improvement. These were done in the fall. The financial impact of these cabins will be very positive for the camp as the current cabin configuration requires a 3 to 1 ratio for camper to counselor.  This ratio is challenging for staffing costs as the children do not require that ratio. This will allow us to staff at 8 to 1 for the children who are 10 and over. We will serve more children more cost effectively. We now have commitments for 4 more of these cabins to be erected this Spring. We have tripled the number of participants in our respite program. Our preschool is close to capacity. The respite weekend and preschool programs have helped with our year round cash flow. It is continued collaborations and a focus on a balance of earned income with our contributed income that is strengthening the financial position for the organization. 

 


Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Related Information

Protect the Environment

Stewardship of our natural resources is essential if we wish to guarantee that present and future generations enjoy clean water, good air quality and open spaces. When you support organizations that protect the environment you address immediate need today while ensuring a greener tomorrow.

Nurture Children & Youth

When families, schools and communities take the view that children and youth are valued and respected assets to society, they necessarily support environments that nurture youth development. Children raised to embrace positive social values, to seek self-understanding, and to value their self-worth grow to become community-minded young adults with a sense of belonging and a belief in their resiliency. See how you can help our community's children grow into tomorrow's leaders.