Helen Keller International/ChildSight® Program
352 Park Avenue South
12th Floor
New York NY 10010
Contact Information
Address 352 Park Avenue South
12th Floor
New York, NY 10010-
Telephone (212) 532-0544 x
Fax 212-532-6014
E-mail info@hki.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The mission of Helen Keller International is to save and improve the sight and lives of the world's vulnerable by combatting the causes and consequences of blindness, poor health and malnutrition. Recognizing a lack of accessible, adequate vision care among low-income children in the United States, HKI established ChildSight® in 1994. The program identifies and treats common vision disorders like nearsightedness by providing in-school vision screenings, prescription eyeglasses, and ophthalmologic referrals to local partners for follow-up care as needed. In so doing, the program “brings education into focus”™ for children who would otherwise be left with poor vision – and unfulfilled potential.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1915
Former Names
Helen Keller Worldwide
American Foundation for Overseas Blind
American Braille Press
Permanent Blind Relief War Fund for Soldiers & Sailors of the Allies
British, French, Belgian Permanent Blind Relief War Fund
Helen Keller International
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Kathy Spahn
Board Chair Mr. Henry Barkhorn III
Board Chair Company Affiliation Investor
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $82,768,369.00
Projected Expenses $82,762,645.00
Statements
Mission

The mission of Helen Keller International is to save and improve the sight and lives of the world's vulnerable by combatting the causes and consequences of blindness, poor health and malnutrition. Recognizing a lack of accessible, adequate vision care among low-income children in the United States, HKI established ChildSight® in 1994. The program identifies and treats common vision disorders like nearsightedness by providing in-school vision screenings, prescription eyeglasses, and ophthalmologic referrals to local partners for follow-up care as needed. In so doing, the program “brings education into focus”™ for children who would otherwise be left with poor vision – and unfulfilled potential.

Background Helen Keller International (HKI) is privileged to carry on the work and legacy of our founding trustee, Helen Keller, whose indomitable spirit continues to guide our work worldwide. Founded in 1915, HKI has grown from a small organization dedicated to serving soldiers blinded in World War I to one of the world’s leading nonprofit organizations working to prevent blindness and reduce malnutrition. Our mission is to save the sight and lives of the most vulnerable and disadvantaged. We combat the causes and consequences of blindness and malnutrition by establishing cost-effective, evidence-based programs in hard-to-reach communities.
Impact

Headquartered in New York City, Helen Keller International’s programs prevent blindness and reduce malnutrition in 22 countries – 13 in Africa, 8 in Asia Pacific, and in the United States – reaching 300 million people each year. In 2009, Helen Keller International received the prestigious António Champalimaud Vision Award in recognition of our significant achievements in preventing blindness worldwide. Last year, Helen Keller International received the 2014 Henry R. Kravis Prize in Leadership, which recognizes extraordinary leadership in the nonprofit sector. This year, we received the 2015 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Development Cooperation for our broad impact around the world.

Needs

In classrooms across Connecticut, children are unable to make the most of their education because their parents cannot afford or easily access the glasses they need to see clearly. Kids struggling with poor vision struggle to learn, to read the blackboard, and to fully engage with their teachers and peers.  With a gift of $25, ChildSight® can provide a vision screening and pair of prescription eyeglasses to a child in need, improving their sight and their academic potential.  Together, with your support, we can continue to "bring education into focus"TM for vulnerable children in Connecticut.

Board Chair Statement


Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Health Care / Management & Technical Assistance
Secondary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Nutrition
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / Blind/Visually Impaired Centers, Services
Areas Served
Internationally
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
National
Other

Headquartered in New York City, HKI’s programs prevent blindness and reduce malnutrition in 22 countries – 13 in Africa, 8 in Asia Pacific, and in the United States – reaching 300 million people each year.  In the United States, our ChildSight program serves students in California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York and Ohio. 

Programs
Description

Recognizing a void in accessible, adequate vision care among low-income children in the U.S., HKI established ChildSight®in 1994.  ChildSight®identifies and treats refractive error by providing in-school vision screenings, prescription eyeglasses, and referrals for follow-up care as needed. In so doing, the program “brings education into focus™” for children who would otherwise be left with poor vision and unfulfilled potential.  ChildSight®serves children in California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Ohio.  Since its inception, the program has screened over 1.7 million children and delivered over 258,000 pairs free eyeglasses to children in need.

 

In 2000, HKI launched ChildSight®Connecticut to provide services to the state’s most vulnerable schoolchildren. Since its inception, the program has screened more than 103,000 children and has provided nearly 23,000 children with the free eyeglasses they needed to focus and thrive, academically and in life.


Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Blacks, African Heritage / Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

In the 2015-2016 academic year, we anticipate that 75% of students surveyed will report that their ChildSight®glasses “help them with their schoolwork” and that 85% of the teachers surveyed will report observing a positive influence on academic performance, classroom participation and/or classroom behavior among students who received ChildSight®eyeglasses.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Goals of ChildSight®:
 
Increase access to eye health services for low-income middle-school students; Improve the vision and academic potential of the targeted students who receive free prescription eyeglasses; and raise community awareness about the importance of maintaining healthy vision.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. HKI continually refines ChildSight®to ensure that it remains an efficient, cost-effective means of addressing the primary eye care needs of poor children. The key indicator of success is our capacity to improve the vision of children who might otherwise be left with untreated vision problems. A secondary indicator is whether children who received eyeglasses exhibit subsequent improved academic performance and classroom behaviors. ChildSight® gathers qualitative information from the students, teachers and school administrators via surveys, which is a compelling measure of program impact. Student surveys are used to assess student eyeglass use prior to and after receiving ChildSight® glasses. Questions are asked about the frequency and length of use; the impact of the glasses on social adjustment, self-perception, and self-reported academic performance; and the overall effect on the child’s activities. Teacher surveys track perceptions of changes in behavior, class participation, educational performance and grades among students who receive glasses.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

“I teach four classes, and I have noticed many of my students wearing glasses now. Behaviors have improved, but, most importantly, students are able to see what is on the projector instead of squinting. 
– Heather Nixon, Math Teacher, John S. Martinez School, New Haven, CT

“One of my students had major difficulties seeing the lessons on the board, no matter where he sat in the classroom. ChildSight® has provided him the opportunity to see posted work more clearly. He completes his work in a more timely fashion, and he remains focused on the task at hand, rather than struggling to see. Thanks to ChildSight®, his self-esteem has also improved.
 
Andrea Bailey, Teacher, Nathan Hale School, New Haven, CT 


“I know that several of my students last year needed to sit in the front
because they could not see without glasses. I additionally had one girl that would get daily headaches. We later found out these headaches were due to her vision problems. After receiving the glasses, the headaches went away.”
 
–Mokrzewski, 7thGrade English teacher at Bennie Dover Jackson Middle
School, New London, CT
CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Kathy Spahn
Term Start Mar 2005
Email info@hki.org
Experience Kathy Spahn, President and Chief Executive Officer of Helen Keller International, is responsible for all operations, programs, finances, communications and public policy initiatives of HKI. Ms. Spahn works closely with the Board of Trustees, global leaders in public health, staff members throughout HKI, partner organizations, and HKI supporters in carrying out her responsibilities. Prior to joining HKI, Ms. Spahn was President and Executive Director of Orbis, a global non-profit organization dedicated to the prevention and treatment of blindness in the developing world. At the time, the organization had four affiliate offices and five country programs, and a medical volunteer corps of 370. Prior to her work with Orbis, she was Executive Director of God’s Love We Deliver, a New York-based AIDS service organization dedicated to combating malnutrition and hunger among people living with HIV/AIDS. Ms. Spahn serves on the Boards of Directors of the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) and The Bernadotte Foundation for Children’s Eyecare, and has also served as a Board member and Chair of InterAction and a member of GAIN’s Partnership Council. She is a Founding Board member of both the North America chapter of IAPB and the Association of Nutrition Services Agencies (ANSA), and a founding partner of the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Disease Control. She also serves on the 2020 and Strategic Advisory Council of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and IFPRI’s Leadership Council Compact of 2025. She joined HKI in March 2005 and is located at headquarters in New York City.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 1021
Number of Part Time Staff 13
Number of Volunteers 0
Staff Retention Rate 91%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1034 Various ethnicities are employed by the agency.
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 0
Unspecified 1034
Senior Staff
Title Vice President for Asia-Pacific
Title Vice President for Eye Health
Title Senior Vice President of Programs
Title Chief Financial Officer
Title Vice President for Africa
Title Vice President, External Relations
Title Vice President, NTDs
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

To help achieve maximum impact in our work, HKI collaborates with hundreds of program partners including local communities, international and local NGOs, national and local governments, and a variety of corporations and foundations in the private sector.

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Vision AwardAntonio Champalimaud Foundation2009
The Henry R. Kravis PrizeHenry R. Kravis Prize in Leadership at Claremont McKenna College2014
BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Development CooperationBBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Development Cooperation2015
Board Chair
Mr. Henry Barkhorn III
Company Affiliation Investor
Term Jan 2016 to Dec 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Randy C. Belcher Fossil Inc.
Ms. Brooks Betts
Ms. Jennifer A. Buda Management and Capital Partners
Dr. R.V. Paul Chan MD, MSc, FACS
Dr. Howard Cohn M.D.American Hospital of Paris
Dr. Anne L. Coleman M.D., Ph.D.Jules Stein Eye Institute
Ms. Mary F. Crawford Industis/EXL
Mr. Anthony Dorment
Mr. Gregory D. Feller
Mr. Desmond FitzGerald North America Properties Group
Dr. Cutberto Garza MD, PhD
Mr. David M. Glassman Prince Management Consulting
Dr. Jean-Pierre Habicht M.D., M.P.H., PH.DCornell University
Dr. Christy L. Hanson ,MPH, PhD
Mr. David P. LeCause Allergan, Inc.
Mr. John Linville JD
Mr. Reynaldo Martorell PhD
Ms. Bettina Maunz
Mr. Mark J. Menting Sullivan and Cromwell
Ms. Beverly Miller Orthwein Retired
Mr. Bradford Perkins FAIA, MRAIC, AICPPerkins Eastman Architects
Mr. James H. Simmons III
Dr. Bruce E. Spivey M.D., M.S., M.Ed.International Council of Ophthalmology
Mr. Robert M. Thomas Jr.Sullivan and Cromwell
Ms. Denise Allen Williams
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 20
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 2 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 16
Female 8
Unspecified 2
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $82,768,369.00
Projected Expenses $82,762,645.00
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
HKI 9902015
HKI 9902014
HKI 9902013
HKI 9902012
HKI 9902011
HKI 9902010
Audit Documents
HKI Audit2015
HKI Audit2014
HKI Audit2013
HKI Audit2012
HKI Audit2011
HKI Audit2010
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
ChildSight Connecticut Fact Sheet2013View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Revenue$72,110,597$58,471,982$59,388,476
Total Expenses$62,283,535$58,591,614$53,227,490
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$28,575,279$15,524,979$19,858,815
Government Contributions$42,042,062$41,860,146$38,152,136
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$42,042,062$41,860,146$38,152,136
Individual Contributions$28,597$30,090$33,035
------
$89,462$71,870$45,086
Investment Income, Net of Losses$29,504($1,152)($24,423)
Membership Dues------
Special Events$1,190,415$785,064$1,005,327
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$155,278$200,985$318,500
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$52,383,897$49,469,921$45,134,685
Administration Expense$8,699,278$8,072,113$6,961,424
Fundraising Expense$1,200,360$1,049,580$1,131,381
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.161.001.12
Program Expense/Total Expenses84%84%85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue2%2%2%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$50,501,786$41,034,335$46,277,097
Current Assets$46,069,252$37,208,111$42,423,533
Long-Term Liabilities$1,190,558$1,277,420$1,005,923
Current Liabilities$18,702,533$18,919,985$24,469,404
Total Net Assets$30,608,695$20,836,930$20,801,770
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountMargaret A. Cargill Foundation $14,200,000Canadian Dept. of Foreign Affairs, Trade & Dev. $14,441,858Canadian Dept. of Foreign Affairs, Trade & Dev. $12,032,099
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDFATD - Dept. of Foreign Affairs, Trade & Dev. of Canada $11,235,652Research Triangle Institute $5,918,181Conrad N. Hilton Foundation $4,800,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountResearch Triangle Institute $8,338,022FHI 360 $5,908,010FHI 360 $4,656,235
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.461.971.73
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets2%3%2%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments


Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 352 Park Avenue South
12th Floor
New York, NY 10010
Primary Phone 212 532-0544
Contact Email info@hki.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Kathy Spahn
Board Chair Mr. Henry Barkhorn III
Board Chair Company Affiliation Investor

 

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