Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness
257 Lawrence Street
Hartford CT 06016
Contact Information
Address 257 Lawrence Street
Hartford, CT 06016-
Telephone (860) 721-7876 x
Fax 860-257-1148
E-mail info@cceh.org
Web and Social Media
Members of the Hartford CAN gather at the Capitol for Advocacy Days.
Mission
The Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness, in partnership with members and communities throughout the state, creates change through leadership, advocacy, and building the capacity of members and the field to respond to environmental challenges. Our collective mission is to prevent and end homelessness in Connecticut.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1985
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Richard Cho
Board Chair Mr. Omar Kouatly
Board Chair Company Affiliation Microsoft
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission The Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness, in partnership with members and communities throughout the state, creates change through leadership, advocacy, and building the capacity of members and the field to respond to environmental challenges. Our collective mission is to prevent and end homelessness in Connecticut.
Background In 1982, Connecticut’s emergency shelters founded the Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness in response to the growing crisis of homelessness. Service providers came together to fight for services and affordable housing for those most in need. Established as a membership organization, CCEH has grown over the last three decades to now include more than 100 organizational and individual members that value and support strategies to end homelessness.In partnership with communities throughout the state, CCEH creates change through leadership, community organizing, advocacy, research, and education. CCEH is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization with a volunteer board of directors and dues-paying members who include emergency shelter providers, transitional housing providers, community and business leaders, and strategic partners.
Impact
We measure our success through concrete results, as we have seen five consecutive years of declining annual numbers of homelessness, representing a 10% drop in 2018 and a 40% total reduction over that period and four consecutive years of declining numbers of homelessness in our Point-in-Time count, which serves as the annual census of the homeless population. This success can be attributed to, in no small part, significant increases in homeless and shelter diversion practices from homeless service providers which CCEH oversees and supports. Calls for request to 211, the states single point of entry for housing services, have remained steady, but diversion rates have nearly doubled in 2018. Underpinning this effort are be homeful emergency assistance funds raised and managed by CCEH. Last year, we nearly doubled our fund raising goals for be homeful, and we began a partnership with the Office of Early Childhood and UConn to fund the program an additional $300,000 a year and conduct a formal evaluation of the program efficacy. To date, be homeful has prevents over 450 families with over 900 children from experiencing the trauma of entering shelter. In 2018, CCEH, along with dozens of funders, disaster case managers, government agencies, and community partners successfully raised and dispersed over $1M in emergency assistance funds statewide to evacuees displaced by Hurricane Maria. This effort prevented nearly 1,500 individuals from entering our homeless service system, and having to experience the trauma of homelessness. 
 
In the coming years we will continue to refine our crisis response system, while implementing new programs and partnerships that move us closer to our goal of ending homelessness in our state. Currently we are working on a number of initiatives including investigating and decreasing the intersection between incarceration and homelessness, matching housing authority resources with more acute client cases who may not be eligble or a good fit for lighter touch interventions, a municipal campaign to engage all 169 towns in the state to make efforts to end homelessness, and bolstering effective outreach efforts to connect more people with necessary services.  
 
Needs

The need for our work is great. Here in Connecticut, approximately 10,000 individuals utilize the shelter system each year. This figure includes approximately 1,000 families with children under the age of 18.

Homelessness is the worst form of poverty. Without a place to sleep, people struggle with the most basic human needs like staying fed and staying warm. The chronically homeless--- those individuals and families who have been homeless for more than a year and have at least one severe disability --- are during many parts of the year exposed to extreme weather conditions and are vulnerable beyond what many of us can imagine.

For children, homelessness presents challenges that go beyond what any person should experience. Homeless children are more likely to have poorer educational outcomes than their peers, are more likely to have repeat interaction with DCF, are more likely to utilize emergency rooms, and are more likely to enter the criminal justice system.

CEO Statement

Established as a membership organization, over the last three decades CCEH has grown to now include more than 100 organizational and individual members that value and support strategies to prevent and end homelessness. CCEH works through its members and colleague organizations to mobilize a strong grassroots base to achieve policy gains. CCEH is the only statewide organization that both collects and analyzes data on local, statewide and national trends relating to homelessness. CCEH uses this information to provide regional and locally focused technical support, information and training to practitioners, planners, and community leaders who seek to eradicate homelessness.

Today, CCEH builds on its history to make continuous strides in the movement to prevent and end homelessness through partnership, community organizing, advocacy, and education. CCEH works to ensure that families and individuals have more than just a bed for the night, but a stable home forever; not a single meal on a cold night, but a paying job that can support healthy groceries throughout the year.

Beyond our membership, CCEH serves a critical role in filling the information gap between and among countless local, state, and federal government and nonprofit systems working on homelessness and housing issues. Our Annual Training Institute provides crucial training to over 350 professionals, amplified by our recent addition of quarterly offerings through our Change Institute.

CCEH also builds the individual and collective voice to prevent and end homelessness through our innovative Leadership, Empowerment, and Advocacy Development training (LEAD) which has trained over 100 for persons experiencing homelessness since 2008.

CCEH’s website is a valuable resource for providers, advocates, the legislature and the public receiving an average of 28,000-30,000 visitors annually, with 1,154 unique visitors in one month alone. CCEH staff responds to hundreds of calls, e-mails, and letters from the wider community seeking to learn about homelessness, identify opportunities for advocacy and education resulting in positive local action as well as technical assistance. We connect providers, advocates and members of communities with the information that they need to better understand the populations that we serve in order to inform social policy, program design and evaluation.

 
Board Chair Statement

 

There are many reasons people experience homelessness but one thing they all share the need for a place to call home. The Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness has a proven track record of harnessing the dedicated and talented partner organizations across the state via education, organization and data analysis to truly make progress towards our goal to make homelessness rare, brief, and non-recurring for individuals and families.

Ending homelessness is not just an aspiration, but a reality we are achieving, as evidenced by our state already ending Veteran and chronic homelessness. We are creating the processes, procedures and tracking mechanisms to end Family and Youth homelessness next!

By ending homelessness we not only eliminate the trauma it causes children and families but it also makes great economic sense for our state. When everyone has a place to call home, fewer expensive emergency services are required, children succeed in school and our state community is strengthened.

We are fortunate to live in a state that has been very supportive of efforts to end homelessness. People in Connecticut are not only compassionate about making sure that neighbors get the help they need, but also understand that homelessness is far more expensive than keeping people housed. When we work together to reduce homelessness, we reduce the need for shelter beds and demand for emergency services that arise from people living on the streets exposed to the elements. By working together to make sure every person has a place to call home, we make our state a better place to live for everybody in this state.

We are grateful to all those who support our efforts, and welcome all to join our Coalition’s efforts to end homelessness in Connecticut.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Community Coalitions
Secondary Organization Category Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy / Alliances & Advocacy
Tertiary Organization Category Unknown / Unknown
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
CCEH works with communities across the state. 
Programs
Description
CCEH provides grassroots organizing and technical assistance for providers and community stakeholders, encouraging collaborative work to end homelessness through embracing best practices and working as a team.
Population Served General/Unspecified / US / Other Named Groups
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. All programs that serve people experiencing homelessness will be aware of resources, regulations, and client level data.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Communities and direct service agencies that work with people who experience homelessness will be better equipped to target their services and end homelessness as we know it.  Currently, new regulations are requiring communities to work together as never before.  The coordination and data that this program area provides will ensure that resources are used efficiently and that clients are more effectively served.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored by CCEH, community partners, the CCEH Board of Directors, and the Information Technology company (Nutmeg IT) that administers our database system.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. The five areas of the state that community impact staff have provided direct staff support to report that their activities are better coordinated.  A pilot to provide more specific system-wide data analysis in Bridgeport is guiding the process of resource allocation there.  This project will bring that capacity to greater New Haven.
Description
CCEH is the recognized source for current, comprehensive data, research, and analysis on homelessness in Connecticut.
Population Served General/Unspecified / US / Other Named Groups
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Communities and direct service agencies that work with people who experience homelessness will be better equipped to target their services and end homelessness as we know it. Currently, new regulations are requiring communities to work together as never before. The coordination and data that this program area provides will ensure that resources are used efficiently and that clients are more effectively served.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored by CCEH, community partners, the CCEH Board of Directors, and the Information Technology company (Nutmeg IT) that administers our database system.
Description
CCEH provides a voice for homeless service providers across Connecticut and in Washington, working to educate the public and policy makers on the problem, the solutions, and the resources we need to end homelessness.
Population Served General/Unspecified / US / Other Named Groups
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored by CCEH, community partners, the CCEH Board of Directors, and the Information Technology company (Nutmeg IT) that administers our database system.
Description
CCEH supports service providers with education, training, and networking opportunities.
Population Served General/Unspecified / US / Other Named Groups
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Communities and direct service agencies that work with people who experience homelessness will be better equipped to target their services and end homelessness as we know it. Currently, new regulations are requiring communities to work together as never before. The information on best practices and skills training that this program area provides will ensure that resources are used efficiently and that clients are more effectively served.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored by CCEH, community partners, the CCEH Board of Directors, and the Information Technology company (Nutmeg IT) that administers our database system.
Description
CCEH offers emergency assistance through direct service providers across the state to individuals and families facing homelessness so they can transition quickly from homelessness to housing.
Population Served Homeless / US / Other Named Groups
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored by CCEH, community partners, the CCEH Board of Directors, and the Information Technology company (Nutmeg IT) that administers our database system.
Program Comments
CEO Comments

Like so many of our members, partners, and peers, the most significant challenge facing our organization
as a whole is the current budget outlook for the State. CCEH's support for and leadership within our sector
has underpinned our ability to defend critical resources including housing vouchers and state support for the
homeless support system. CCEH is also addressing this challenge by strategically diversifying our funding
base by strengthening partnerships with private philanthropy and the private sector.

CEO/Executive Director
Dr. Richard Cho
Term Start Nov 2018
Email rcho@cceh.org
Experience
Dr. Cho brings 20 years of experience in the housing and homelessness sector to CCEH. From 2013 to 2016, Cho served as the Deputy Director at the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, the federal agency that coordinates the federal response to homelessness. At USICH, Dr. Cho was responsible for coordinating the efforts across 19 federal departments to implement Opening Doors, the federal strategic plan to end and prevent homelessness in America, and played a key role in the national push to end veteran and chronic homelessness.He also held several positions at the Corporation for Supportive Housing, where he spearheaded the development of supportive housing models and policies for people experiencing homelessness, veterans, justice-involved populations, and other vulnerable populations. For the last two and half years, Cho has been helping to lead national efforts to improve police interactions with people with mental health needs, and to reduce the number of people with mental illnesses in jails, including helping to increase connections to stable housing. He currently serves on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Crisis Prevention and Response Task Force, as well as the Kings County/Brooklyn (NY) District Attorney Eric Gonzalez’s Justice 2020 Committee, Mental Health Subcommittee. He brings a breadth of national and regional experience to the role.
Co-CEO
Experience
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 14
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 64%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Lisa Tepper-BatesJan 2013 - Aug 2018
Ms. Carol E. WalterDec 2006 - Dec 2012
Senior Staff
Title Chief Executive Officer
Experience/Biography 1 Year
Title Deputy Director
Experience/Biography 4 Years
Title Director of HMIS and Stratigic Analysis
Experience/Biography 1 Year
Title Director of Advocacy and Community Impact
Experience/Biography 8 Years
Title Director of Finance
Title Development Consultant
Experience/Biography 6 Years
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

CCEH partners closely with members of the Partnership for Strong Community’s Reaching Home Campaign, including the Work Groups for Youth and Young Adults, Families, and Re-Tooling. Specific agency partners with whom we work most closely are the Center for Children’s Advocacy, DCF, and the Connection with regard to youth. With regard to families, we work very closely with 211, DCF, the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence (CCADV), and increasingly with the Office of Early Childhood. We work closely across all populations with DOH and DHMAS. In this next phase of work, CCEH envisions building on the relationship we have begun to establish with agencies and stakeholders outside of the homeless response system including criminal justice, the Department of Correction, schools, and the community college system.


Board Chair
Mr. Omar Kouatly
Company Affiliation Microsoft
Term May 2019 to June 2021
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Jeff AndersonKelley's Pace
Belinda Arce-LopezCenter for Human Development
Tanya BarrettUnited Way of Connecticut
Mary ConklinConnecticut Legal Services, Inc.
Alison CunninghamColumbus House, Inc.
Jeff CurreyConnecticut General Assembly
Anderson CurtisACLU of Connecticut
Peter DeBiasiAccess Community Action Agency
David DudleyNew Opportunities, Inc., Shelter NOW
David FayThe Bushnell
Louis GilbertImmaCare Inc.
Mike LawlorUniversity of New Haven
Beth MecteauConnecticut Association of REALTORS�, Inc.
Jennifer ParadisBeth-El Center, Inc.
Carl SchiesslConnecticut Hospital Association
Tressa Spears JacksonCommunity Health Network of Connecticut
Catherine ZallNew London Homeless Hospitality Center
Catherine ZeinerYWCA of the Hartford Region, Inc.
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 14
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 10
Female 9
Unspecified 0
Board Co-Chair
Ms. Belinda Arce-Lopez
Company Affiliation Center for Human Development
Term May 2019 to June 2021
Email barcelopez@chd.org
Standing Committees
Board Governance
Finance
CEO Comments
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2019
Fiscal Year End June 30 2020
Projected Revenue $4,130,794.00
Projected Expenses $4,130,794.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201820172016
Total Assets$1,908,442$1,195,721$1,071,467
Current Assets$1,899,671$1,185,507$1,057,787
Long-Term Liabilities$626,175$216,615$252,011
Current Liabilities$13,803$12,739$10,269
Total Net Assets$1,268,464$966,367$809,187
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201820172016
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDept. of Housing $1,251,826Dept. of Housing $1,405,794Dept. of Housing $1,985,840
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDept. of Mental Health & Addition Services $333,500US Dept. of Housing & Urban Dev. $213,754UW Coastal Fairfield County $257,171
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Synchrony Financial $210,000US Dept. of Housing & Urban Dev. $193,458
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 257 Lawrence Street
Hartford, CT 06016
Primary Phone 860 721-7876
Contact Email info@cceh.org
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Richard Cho
Board Chair Mr. Omar Kouatly
Board Chair Company Affiliation Microsoft

 

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