Naugatuck Valley Project
26 LUDLOW STREET
WATERBURY CT 06710-1820
Contact Information
Address 26 LUDLOW STREET
WATERBURY , CT 06710-1820
Telephone (203) 574-2410 x
Fax 203-574-3545
E-mail nvp@conversent.net
Web and Social Media
Mission

 NVP’s mission is to bring together Valley residents, especially the poor and working poor, to build community, develop their leadership skills, and act on their faith and democratic values to create the power to address the systemic causes of poverty and injustice in the Valley.

During the past 30 years NVP leaders have created a vibrant community organization whose issue achievements have resulted in better lives for the poor and working poor people in the Valley through issue campaigns that have brought millions of public and private dollars into the Valley for job training, brownfield remediation, housing code enforcement and anti-predatory lending, as well as the creation of affordable cooperative housing developments, worker-owned companies, and a community land trust that has had a lasting impact in our region and served as a model for dozens of communities nationally.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1985
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Kenneth Adam Galdston
Board Chair Bishop Lionel French
Board Chair Company Affiliation Gospel Tabernacle Ministries, Waterbury
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

 NVP’s mission is to bring together Valley residents, especially the poor and working poor, to build community, develop their leadership skills, and act on their faith and democratic values to create the power to address the systemic causes of poverty and injustice in the Valley.

During the past 30 years NVP leaders have created a vibrant community organization whose issue achievements have resulted in better lives for the poor and working poor people in the Valley through issue campaigns that have brought millions of public and private dollars into the Valley for job training, brownfield remediation, housing code enforcement and anti-predatory lending, as well as the creation of affordable cooperative housing developments, worker-owned companies, and a community land trust that has had a lasting impact in our region and served as a model for dozens of communities nationally.

Background

The Naugatuck Valley Project is a regional organization of religious congregations and tenant, labor, and small business organizations organized in 1983 to save and create jobs, affordable housing, and critical public and private services in the Naugatuck Valley of Connecticut, one of the oldest industrial areas in the nation.

Since its beginning NVP has united those facing injustice and the growing economic divide—the poor, the working poor, and their allies—whether as workers facing a plant closing, tenants in rundown or overpriced housing, homeowners who are victims of predatory lending, the elderly without decent home healthcare or transportation, or immigrants seeking critical medical care in their own language—to engage in common action to change laws, intervene to bring about worker-owned companies, or resident-owned housing cooperatives, and hold private actors accountable to the needs of the region’s low-income families and the region as a whole.

Underlying NVP's explicit social change goals is the implicit goal of strengthening communities by bringing diverse people together around their common faith and democratic values. NVP campaigns also target economic and racial institutional injustice, empowering community members to take an active role in redressing inequities that have been entrenched for lifetimes and longer. In prioritizing our work, we place an emphasis on projects that restore dignity and political power through leader-led organizing campaigns—while winning jobs, affordable housing, and critical health care and other services. Our successful organizing, which connects people across lines of ethnicity, class and geography, creates an oasis of shared mutuality within our very polarized and fragmented American society, modeling the truth of our interdependence.

NVP is a founding member of the InterValley Project (IVP), a New England community organizing network formed in 1997 by NVP and 3 other similar groups to strengthen leadership, organizer and organizational development. It now has 7 affiliates. IVP provides NVP with leadership and staff development services through monthly visits, monthly network-wide organizer meetings for exchange and training, quarterly network leadership meetings, and an annual leadership institute.

Impact

Accomplishments

1) Winning $3 million for the redevelopment of the 22-year old, 102-unit, multi-racial self-governed Brookside Cooperative Housing. These funds will pay for the replacement roofs and windows and boilers which will allow the units to be more energy efficient, as well as an upgrade of kitchens and bathrooms.

2) Shaping discussion around the future of two Waterbury hospitals, the chief sources of acute medical care in the Valley and Waterbury’s largest employers, as proposals are made to move them from non-profit to for-profit, out-of the Valley ownership.

3) Working with Catholic pastors and lay people, the Office for Catholic Social Justice Ministry and a statewide coalition to win passage of the Connecticut Safe Drivers Act, allowing all immigrants to seek to qualify for licenses, reduce their fear of arrest, improve their ability to contribute to economic growth and reducing risk to the general public of accidents involving unqualified drivers.

4) Conducting 12 house meetings with 160 participants focused on Aging with Dignity. This has led to a campaign to win improved home healthcare through improved home healthcare jobs and NVP helping lay the groundwork for model homecare worker training to help reduce the hospital readmission of patients with chronic diseases while improving the quality of homecare jobs.

Goals

1) Complete the Brookside redevelopment

2) Creation of a job training partnership for home health care workers including hospitals, Griffin Hospital’s School of Allied Health, home care agencies, NVP and Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute as a technical resources.

3) Winning resources for programs that will allow those who want to age at home instead of being forced into nursing home care prematurely for want of simple services, to do so. These include adequate funding of Meals on Wheels, respite care, and a program for repairing the homes of low-income elders to reduce physical barriers to their living at home.

4) Working to ensure that the training, compensation, and career path for homecare workers improves their jobs, reduces turnover, and encourages hundreds of women between 25-44 to enter this field. The anticipated dramatic shortage of homecare workers in the face of a mounting need among the baby boom generation heightens the value of taking these steps.

Needs

1) Funding – Our annual budget is $195,415 and we raise 20% of it through our own efforts. NVP’s organizing leads to improvements in the well being of thousands of Valley residents on a very limited budget. Almost all of our money goes to the organizers’ salaries who work to bring together Valley residents across lines of difference race, ethnicity, language, faith, age, income and geography to help them build community, teach them how to take action to win concrete victories, and win concrete change that improves peoples lives and justice in the Valley. Additional funds will allow us to meet the growing need for additional organizing staff to help NVP build a stronger voice for equitable and just economy. As with all volunteer organizations, NVP needs additional leaders. Currently NVP is identifying and seeking to hire a new Staff Director/Lead Organizer.

2) Volunteers – Additional volunteer leaders mean more power—in numbers, creativity, representation, energy and fundraising—and more opportunities for growth and learning.

3) Additional Member Groups – As the Valley becomes more diverse we work hard to bring into membership congregations, labor union locals, housing and other community-based organizations that reflect its diversity.

CEO Statement

NVP was created by a unique mix of religious, labor and community institutions concerned about the wave of plant closings and its impact on the Valley’s ability to help its residents achieve stable, family-supporting lives. As a multi-issue organization, focused on helping individuals and groups build relationships across lines of racial, ethnic, religious, income, age and geographic difference, and teaching them leadership and organizing skills to shape decisions that shape the Valley’s future, it has played an important role in the lives of thousands of Valley residents during the past 30 years.

 

In combining citizen organizing and democratic economic development–the creation of worker-owned firms, cooperative housing and a community land trust–growing out of organizing campaigns, it has also served as a model for, and helped create, seven other similar organizations in New England. It has also inspired the work of scores of other organizations nationwide.

 

The Valley has communities with a rich industrial history, a great mix of people, and where the scale of public life if small enough to have a large impact, diverse enough to serve as a model for other, larger diverse communities, and the values of faith and having a voice in shaping one’s future are palpable.

 

It has been a wonderful community in which to build a powerful and inspiring organization.

NVP was created by a unique mix of religious, labor and community institutions concerned about the wave of plant closings and its impact on the Valley’s ability to help its residents achieve stable, family-supporting lives. As a multi-issue organization, focused on helping individuals and groups build relationships across lines of racial, ethnic, religious, income, age and geographic difference, and teaching them leadership and organizing skills to shape decisions that shape the Valley’s future, it has played an important role in the lives of thousands of Valley residents during the past 30 years.

 

 

In combining citizen organizing and democratic economic development–the creation of worker-owned firms, cooperative housing and a community land trust–growing out of organizing campaigns, it has also served as a model for, and helped create, seven other similar organizations in New England. It has also inspired the work of scores of other organizations nationwide.

 

The Valley has communities with a rich industrial history, a great mix of people, and where the scale of public life if small enough to have a large impact, diverse enough to serve as a model for other, larger diverse communities, and the values of faith and having a voice in shaping one’s future are palpable.

 

It has been a wonderful community in which to build a powerful and inspiring organization.

Board Chair Statement “We are concerned about the well-being of everyone in the Valley, but especially those who are without jobs and those who are working yet don’t earn enough to support their families. I volunteer with NVP because it gives me a concrete way to act on my faith.”
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy / Alliances & Advocacy
Secondary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Community Coalitions
Tertiary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit /
Areas Served
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Other
Ansonia
Derby
Seymour
NVP serves the towns along the Naugatuck River Valley:  Waterbury, Seymour, Ansonia, Derby, Oakville, Watertown, Thomaston and Torrington
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

This set of keywords should help someone interested in identifying an non-profit, non-partisan organization rooted in the community that empowers local leaders to identify and address pressing economic, social and environmental issues through organizing, economic development and alliance-building strategies.

Programs
Description

Leadership Development - Through formal and informal training,

working with individuals and groups, NVP organizers and IVP staff

teach leaders how to identify and tell their own story; build

relationships; build a powerful regional organization to determine issue

priorities and take public action to bring about needed change.
Population Served Adults / At-Risk Populations / Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Our leadership team will grow from its current core of a dozen formal leaders plus 50 additional leaders to core of 25 plus 125 additional leaders.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. When new leaders take on responsibilities; when current leaders take on new roles and responsibilities; when people express the importance of what they are learning or how they are growing; when we add new, diverse leaders.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. We have increased the number of low-income, women, people of racial and ethnic diversity on our leadership team compared with last year's team.
Description

Building Community Across Lines of Difference - We provide training and the opportunity at every meeting or event for leaders to have one-on-one meetings with people they don't know or don't know well, to get to know them, their story of why they care about the community and what is important to them in their lives right now. We also teach congregations and other organizations how to conduct 10-week long relationship building campaigns to strengthen ties, identify new potential leaders for the work of the congregation or organization and for their participation in NVP.

Population Served Adults / General/Unspecified / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Adding diverse groups to our issue teams as they fight for community benefits agreement in hospital ownership from non-profit to for-profit status; more funds for affordable housing energy efficiency programs;  improved services to allow people to age in their homes; better compensation and job training and a career path for home care workers.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Significant change in the way that people of different faiths, ethnicities, races, incomes, ages and geographic location relate to and work with each other in the Valley.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Self-reporting in evaluations carried out at the end of every meeting, action and campaign.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Linking immigrants from Central and Latin America, Albania, and the Azores in a campaign to win improved medical interpretation services at the Valley's and state's hospitals.
Description We then teach leaders how to listen to each others' issues, determine priorities and develop a concrete plan to move from general issues areas - "job," "housing," "environment" - to specific issue campaigns that involve those most affected by the issue and their allies, and  focus on specific achievable change.
Population Served General/Unspecified / Hispanic, Latino Heritage / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The redevelopment of Brookside Cooperative Housing; the signing of a community benefits agreement with any new owner of a Valley hospital; breakthrough pilot training programs for home care workers that allow them to remain in their jobs with the prospect of advancement in the health care sector, if they so choose; strengthened resources for services and programs that allow an increasing number of older residents to age in their homes instead of in nursing homes.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Thousands of Valley residents who have learned how to build community, leadership skills and how to take public action to win concrete jobs, housing and community service improvements that begin to shift their sense of their own power to shape their destinies.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. When we win changes that affect people's lives positively, and they feel that they are the reason the change came out, we have success.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. NVP participated in the national campaign that just resulted in the President's order to bring thousands of home care workers under the protections of the Fair Labor Standards Act; we have initiated a serious conversation with Griffin Hospital about their creating a preferred provider status for home care agencies that send their employes to training at the Griffin School for Allied Health; and NVP recently has won nearly $3 million for Brookside development. 
Description Creating Cooperative Enterprises - Jobs, housing, land trust Over the years NVP leaders have created worker-owned companies, cooperative housing developments and a community land trust. These undertakings translate our desire to change the balance of power so that key Valley residents can own and shape their businesses, jobs and housing
Population Served Adults / At-Risk Populations / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Increasing number of community assets owned and controlled by those whose lives depend on their success.  This may be additional units of cooperatively owned housing, additional worker-owned firms, or a time bank for the legal bartering of services.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Completion of redevelopment.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. NVP's work with leaders at Brookside and the Naugatuck Valley Housing Development Corporation, a community land trust created by NVP, to win $3 million in funding for the Brookside redevelopment.
CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Kenneth Adam Galdston
Term Start Sept 2008
Email nvp@conversent.net
Experience

Ken Galdston serves as InterValley Project Supporting Organizer for NVP, as NVP identifies and hires its next Staff Director/Lead Organizer. Ken served as NVP's founding Staff Director/Lead Organize, and he now provides technical support for NVP work through his role as the director of the InterValley Project, a New England community-organizing network that NVP  helped found in 1997.  He has more than 35 years of experience as an organizer and a developer of community-based enterprises, as well as a Master's in Public and Private management from the Yale School of Management.

Co-CEO
Email nvp@conversent.net
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 50
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 2
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Ms. Carol Burkhart-Lyons -
Mr. John Humphries -
Senior Staff
Title Lead Orgnizer
Experience/Biography

She has been an organizer with NVP since 2000, working with new immigrants around health care, youth, predatory lending issues.  She also serves as Co-Pastor of Iglesia Pentecostal Casa del Perdon in Waterbury.

Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

NVP creates formal collaborations, such as the Naugatuck Valley Healthcare

Jobs Partnership, which focused in training for healthcare jobs at Valley

hospitals, and has created and participated in a broad range of alliances

around winning specific policy changes, such as our successful statewide

campaign to win Medicaid funding to reimburse hospitals for medical

interpretation costs. This latter effort grew out of a successful campaign to

get Valley hospitals to improve the quality of and access to medical

interpretation services for 25,000 Limited English Proficient (LEP)

Valley residents.

 

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Jubilee CenterEpiscopal Diocese of Connecticut2003
Board Chair
Bishop Lionel French
Company Affiliation Gospel Tabernacle Ministries, Waterbury
Term May 2013 to Oct 2014
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mrs. Angela Aybar El Tabernaculo, Inc. Waterbury
Ms. Nelisa Barbosa Unity Square Housing Cooperative, Waterbury
Father John M. Cooney Retired
Ms. Victoria Encarcion South End Neighborhood Association, Waterbury
Mr. John Gorman Mattatuck Unitarian Universalist Society, Woodbury
Mrs. Brenda Morisette Western CT Central Labor Council, Waterbury
Mrs. Bonnie Odiorne First Congregational Church, Waterbury
Mr. Herman Reid Sacred Heart-Sagrado Corazon Church, Waterbury
Mr. Alex Rencsko Sacred Heart Church, Southbury
Ms. Catherine Salazar-Smith Western CT Central Labor Council, Waterbury
Mr. Steve Schrag Western CT Central Labor Council, Waterbury
Mrs. Cynthia Vergauwen Our Savior Lutheran Church, Thomaston
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 7
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
CEO Comments
NVP's President, by right of position, and two other senior leaders serve on the Board of the InterValley Project, our cooperative New England organizing network, through which we recruit, train and develop organizers; conduct three-times-a year leadership training, develop and replicate common campaigns, and raise funds together. 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Sept 01 2013
Fiscal Year End Aug 31 2014
Projected Revenue $195,415.00
Projected Expenses $195,415.00
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Audit Documents
Financial Statements2012
IRS Letter of Exemption
501(c)(3)
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Program Expense$55,977----
Administration Expense$67,668----
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.04----
Program Expense/Total Expenses45%----
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%----
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Total Assets$20,143----
Current Assets$19,414----
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$16,376----
Total Net Assets$3,767----
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201220112010
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountAtena Foundation $25,000----
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountConnecticut Health Foundation $17,500----
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCS Mott $16,000----
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.19----
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%----
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 26 LUDLOW STREET
WATERBURY , CT 067101820
Primary Phone 203 574-2410
Contact Email nvp@conversent.net
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Kenneth Adam Galdston
Board Chair Bishop Lionel French
Board Chair Company Affiliation Gospel Tabernacle Ministries, Waterbury

 

Related Information

Promote Civic Vitality

Greater New Haven’s vibrancy is linked to its communities’ support of its neighborhoods, public gardens and sports, as well as its commitment to the protection of its people and pets.