New Haven Works
205 Whitney Avenue, Suite 106
New Haven CT 06511-3797
Contact Information
Address 205 Whitney Avenue, Suite 106
New Haven, CT 06511-3797
Telephone (203) 562-9000 x
Fax 203-562 9000
E-mail info@newhavenworkspipeline.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
New Haven Works (NHW) seeks to build a middle class in an urban center and improve economic stability in all communities by providing employers with a qualified workforce and connecting New Haven residents to good jobs.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2013
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Melissa Mason
Board Chair Jorge Perez
Board Chair Company Affiliation State of Connecticut Banking Commission
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $895,295.00
Projected Expenses $923,392.00
Statements
Mission New Haven Works (NHW) seeks to build a middle class in an urban center and improve economic stability in all communities by providing employers with a qualified workforce and connecting New Haven residents to good jobs.
Background

In 2013, major employers, labor and elected city officials collaborated to create New Haven Works, a public/private organization designed to ensure that regional employers and businesses have access to a local talent pool and that qualified, pre-screened city residents have access to good jobs and career pathways. The New Haven Works Board of Directors includes the Mayor of New Haven, the President of the Board of Alders, the President of the Chamber of Commerce and Vice-Presidents from Yale University and Yale-New Haven Hospital, as well as community and labor representatives.

This innovative model creates access to good jobs by signing partner agreements with regional employers and by helping city residents navigate hiring processes in a competitive job market and access available resources to overcome barriers in education, transportation and training. New Haven Works, through its partnerships with employers and quality training programs, is helping to bring down the City’s unemployment rate, particularly for residents of color. New Haven Works is a key part of a public/private collaboration to improve the economic stability of urban neighborhoods, create a stronger middle-class in New Haven, and increase the region’s economic development.
Impact

Through a change in leadership and at the beginning of its third year and subsequent changes in staff, New Haven Works has maintained organizational stability. In its third year, New Haven Works continues to make progress in each of its key programs. In FY’16 NHW enrolled an additional 522 new members and placed 342 into regular or temporary jobs. New Haven Works significantly expanded its employer engagement efforts by bringing on a Business Development Director. The year was focused on strengthening New Haven Works' “Anchor” relationships (Yale University, Yale-New Haven Hospital, and the City of New Haven. Over the course of the year, New Haven Works increased referral volume significantly. We engaged over 60 employers to better understand their hiring needs and process, discussed the New Haven Works program and services offered, and established a working relationship several new employers. NHW was able to send referrals to 55 unique employers (not counting Anchors), nearly doubling the number of referral partnerships year-over-year.

In the coming year, New Haven Works' focus will be to enhance our work in the following areas:

1. Employer Engagement: NHW will build on the relationships developed last year with existing partners and develop a limited number of new employer connections, based on some key lessons learned throughout the previous year.

2. Member Engagement: NHW will be focusing on the components of quality member engagement. This includes taking inventory of the services and case management NHW provides and how they can be improved.

3. Construction Pipeline: New Haven Works will focus on the Construction Industry and the creation of partnership with contractors, developers and unions in the building trades.

Staff Training and Professional Development: NHW will continue to pursue opportunities for training and development for its staff.
 


Needs

1.  New Haven Works needs to increase its organizational capacity to assist its members in obtaining good quality, full-time employment. In addition to the existing 5 full-time equivalent (FTE) job coaches, NHW needs another job coach to assist members seeking employment in the education and healthcare fields. The cost of one FTE job coach is approximately $50,000 including fringe benefits and taxes.    

2.  New Haven Works must continue to pursue diverse funding sources for existing and new programming.
 
3.  New Haven Works must continue to improve upon communications and feedback mechanisms with human resource departments to better serve both the business community and members.
 
4.  New Haven Works must pursue employer connections to construction contractors and apprenticeship pathways with the building trades unions in order to effectively build a Construction Pipeline that results in good jobs and careers in construction for New Haven residents.
 
5.  New Haven Works needs to further develop its communications strategy to create brand/visibility for business community as well as other community stakeholders. 
 
CEO Statement

New Haven Works collaborates with major employers and small businesses, as well as workforce development providers, support services, government initiatives, and labor organizations to identify comprehensive training programs for specific hiring needs in regional growth industries. New Haven Works pre-screened participants acquire the competencies, industry specific skills and certifications that employers need, and New Haven Works provides the individualized case management to ensure successful placement and retention in a good job. By connecting local families to employment opportunities and regional employers to qualified New Haven residents, New Haven Works builds stable neighborhoods and fosters long-term regional economic growth and development.

New Haven Works is successful in part because of the will of its diverse stakeholders. Government, employers, the community and labor all recognized the convergence of the following: (1) The urgent need to respond to violence and crime in the City and the understanding that improved economic security in the city’s high poverty neighborhoods would make safer and prosperous city for everyone (2) Continued economic growth and investment in the city’s core industries and the need to meet evolving workforce needs in the future. New Haven Works has support at the local and state government levels and partnerships with the city’s largest employers.

New Haven Works is a coordinating agency based on an understanding of existing resources and systematic gaps in order to not duplicate training programs or workforce development programs. We address key obstacles faced by job seekers by providing target supports and the one-on-one attention necessary to make it into a pre-screened applicant pool, get an interview, and get hired. We recognize that many employers pursue a local hiring strategy for a variety of reasons. They need a pre-screened, qualified, trained applicant pool and a streamlined process for recruitment and hiring. Meeting the needs of both job seekers and employers only works with collaboration and a comprehensive understanding of the specific jobs employers are seeking to fill.
 
 
Board Chair Statement

New Haven Works is the result of a grassroots public mandate to address a jobs crisis in the city of New Haven, where in some neighborhoods 22% of the residents are unemployed or underemployed, despite the fact that our core industries – particularly healthcare and education – are expanding (DataHaven 2016). Since opening in June 2013 we have made significant progress towards addressing the jobs crisis in the City and has since shifted its focus more heavily on the neighborhoods where the return to employment has been slower than the citywide average.

The creation of New Haven Works was the culmination of a two-year multi-stakeholder process, involving public hearings, a collaboration between the public and private sectors, and union, community, and business groups, to move residents into good jobs and provide job-ready applicants for local employers. New Haven Works seeks to:

1. Build a talent pool for regional businesses by recruiting, preparing, and screening City of New Haven residents for available jobs in growth occupations.

2. Collaborate on career pathways in educational services, healthcare, and construction to meet employer demand for a skilled workforce

3. Create access to regional jobs for city residents by collaborating with partner and participating employers to ensure that local residents successfully navigate pathways to employment.

Since we opened our doors, we have placed over 1000 city residents into jobs (including over 300 at Yale University, one of the region’s most competitive employers). That’s 1,000 families with more stable economic futures – strengthening the neighborhoods in which they reside.

With our success, the demand for our services continues to grow. New Haven Works’ coalition of stakeholders has been and will continue to be absolutely vital for this work and on behalf of our Board of Directors, I look forward to working with them towards connecting the next 1,000 New Haven residents to jobs with regional employers.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Employment / Employment Preparation & Procurement
Secondary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit /
Areas Served
New Haven
New Haven
Programs
Description
New Haven Works assists members in developing their career plans by providing services such as: revising resumes, creating online profiles, completing job applications and acquiring interviewing skills. In addition, NHW matches candidates' skills to jobs with partner employers.
Population Served Adults / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Short term success is to achieve annual goal of 350 total placements, and at least two-thirds (230) city residents hired into good, regular jobs.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The mandate from the Board of Directors and the communities of New Haven is to place 1000 city residents into good jobs in the first four years of the program.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Employer verification of all placements, and feedback from partner employers on the quality of matched candidates and referrals. 
 
Tracking wage data and progress on a career pathway. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Over the course of the past year, New Haven Works has engaged over 60 employers to better understand their hiring needs and process, discuss the New Haven Works program and services offered, and to establish a working relationship. We were able to send referrals to 55 unique employers (in addition to our three Anchor partners--Yale University, Yale-New Haven Hospital, and the City of New Haven), nearly doubling the number of referral partnerships year-over-year. Increased activities led to increased outcomes. Over the course of FY'16 we implemented internal tracking systems to be able to assess how our employer engagement efforts translates to outcomes, including interviews, hires, and candidate feedback. Among non-Anchor employers, we were able to generate 133 interviews, 39 hires, and 46 quality pieces of candidate feedback. In total, New Haven Works placed 343 members in employment last year.
Description New Haven Works’ 3-day job preparation and placement program developed in collaboration with partner employers to give participants the skills and tools necessary to succeed in the job search, in interviews, and on the job.
Population Served Adults / Offenders/Ex-Offenders / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The long-term success will be defined by how many graduates of the E4E workshops are placed in jobs that pay $15/hour over the course of two years after graduation.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Successful placement into regular jobs, questionnaires by employers and participants.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. When one member came into the E4E Workshop, her main goal was to get into Yale University. She has a Bachelor's degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Healthcare Administration and has over 25 years of experience in the healthcare industry, processing medical claims, payment adjustments, audit/compliances and health care data collection. She believed that she would flourish in an administrative role at Yale University. But she needed to improve her interviewing skills. She had participated in a Yale University panel interview session and felt that she did not do well. In the workshop, Constance took part in a mock group interview; she was interviewed by a panel of her peers for a position at Yale University. They were able to give her feedback on what she needed to improve on so that she could pass the Yale interview test. Constance had another interview with Yale University and was chosen for a Program Analyst position at Yale University.
Description

In FY’16 New Haven Works significantly expanded its employer engagement efforts by bringing on a Business Development Director. The year was focused on strengthening New Haven Works' “Anchor” relationships (Yale University, Yale-New Haven Hospital, and the City of New Haven), moving existing employer relationships towards more meaningful participation, and expanding employer connections. NHW engaged employers for two primary purposes – to increase program outcomes and to assess key strategic questions that would inform the development of NHW’s program moving forward.


Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Goals for FY 17 include: (1) “Engagement” activities with 90 Employers (activities include coordinating referrals, candidate feedback, hiring process alignment, job requests, and meetings) and (2) Establishing 15 new Employer referral relationships
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Looking ahead New Haven Works plans to build on top of the relationships developed and lessons learned in FY’16 by (1) Moving several existing employer relationships to more formal “Partner Employer” status; (2) Identifying and strengthening existing employer connections that have proven to not yield effective outcomes; and (3) Developing a limited amount of new employer connections, based on some of the key lessons learned in FY’16.

These efforts will be geared to increase and make more efficient our outcomes, and to continue to learn how we can best position our services to meet the needs of employers.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. NHW tracks employer engagement by measuring the number of referral relationships developed, number of interviews with employers and the quantity and quality of employer feedback on our candidates.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. In the second quarter of FY 2017, New Haven Works focused on strengthening existing employer relationships, while introducing a handful of new relationships. Specifically, we focused on increasing the number of interviews obtained by our members, and making sure that we had more and higher quality feedback obtained from the employer. To this end, we have seen a greater than 50% increase in the rate of interviews stemming from referrals (43% vs. 27% in FY'16) and a nearly 300% increase in feedback received stemming from referrals (28% vs. 10% in FY'16). While interviews and feedback have increased, hiring rates have remained stable at around 10%. We will be dedicating more structured interview prep procedures to help increase the conversion rates from interview to hiring. In addition to existing relationships, New Haven Works has struck up a handful of new referral relationships with entities that include Quinnipiac University, Liberty Bank, and several local non-profits.
Description

With both the growth in the construction industry and with the aging construction workforce, we anticipate seeing a growth in the demand for workers in the construction industry. New Haven Works is well positioned to help develop the city’s construction workforce. By capitalizing on over three years of experience removing barriers to employment, New Haven Works staff will create pathways for residents who have traditionally struggled to navigate and connect with opportunities in the construction industry.

Population Served Adults / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our goal is to develop a "ready to refer" pool of candidates to work on commercial construction worksites and place 22 New Haven residents into jobs in the construction field by the end of FY 2017. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Ultimately, New Haven Works, in partnership with various stakeholders (city, state, regional contractors, Building Trades Unions) develops a consistent pipeline of New Haven residents into construction careers - either by entering any of the unions in the building trades through their apprenticeship programs or by obtaining permanent employment with regional commercial construction contractors. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We are monitoring the success of this program by the quantity and quality of job placements in construction jobs, as well as the access to quality and industry-specific training and apprenticeship opportunities. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Although this program is in its pilot stage, it is making good progress. In March, NHW hosted an information session at the Wilson Branch Library in New Haven to recruit potential participants in the pipeline. Nearly 30 people attended and are in the process of getting screened/assessed.
Description NHW provides transportation assistance in the form of bus passes or parking passes to members to attend an interview and/or during the two first weeks of employment. 
Population Served Adults / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We track the impact of this program by tracking job placement and retention.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

In the second quarter of this fiscal year, New Haven Works saw forty-six (46) members utilize the transportation subsidy to participate in E4E and upon obtaining employment. 

CEO/Executive Director
Melissa Mason
Term Start June 2015
Email director@newhavenworkspipeline.org
Experience Melissa Mason serves as the Executive Director of New Haven Works. Melissa holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and African American Studies from Yale University. She grew up in North Haven, spending many summers volunteering and taking classes in New Haven. While finishing her Ph.D. and after graduating, Melissa worked as an organizer and researcher for UNITE HERE. During this time she worked on campaigns in New Haven, Vancouver, Philadelphia, and Washington DC. This work was closely aligned to her academic research, which focused on how community-union partnerships strengthen unions and expand economic opportunities for communities. In addition to her academic and professional work, Melissa has significant political and policy experience. She has worked regularly with New Haven’s Board of Alders and served on New Haven’s Charter Revision Commission in 2013. Through extensive engagements with policymakers and citizens across the city, Melissa has developed a deep understanding of unemployment and underemployment in New Haven from an academic, policy and personal perspective. She currently resides in Westville with her husband, daughter and dog.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 9
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 25
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 70%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 9
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mary Reynolds Jan 2013 - June 2015
Senior Staff
Title Director of Business Development
Experience/Biography

Boris comes to New Haven Works with a particular focus on building closer relationships with the regional business community, making sure that the services offered by New Haven Works makes hiring qualified New Haven residents as easy as possible for local businesses. He’s committed to making sure that New Haven growth translates into opportunities for local residents and businesses.

Boris has extensive experience building capacity for early stage organizations. Before coming to New Haven in 2012, he served as the Director of Finance and Operations at Groundswell, a social enterprise in Washington DC focused on the intersection of energy and community economic development. There he was responsible for developing and executing the business strategy for the organization.

Boris completed his MBA at the Yale School of Management in 2014. Over the last year, he has worked closely with Yale University, the City of New Haven and the business development community on strategies to increase the participation of local businesses in the supply chains of New Haven’s large institutions and businesses.

Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
New Haven Works is a coordinating entity that meets the needs of both employers and job seekers by bringing together existing services and programs, maximizing the use of public and private funds, and providing individualized job matching and support for our members and for employers. The greater New Haven region offers a variety of programs, service providers, and support systems. New Haven Works seeks to provide a more centralized, comprehensive, and transparent system of workforce connectivity for New Haven residents. Our success would not be possible without these community partners, including EDC/REX of New Haven, The New Haven Public Schools, New Haven Free Public Library, Easter Seals/Goodwill, Columbus House, EMERGE, Connecticut Center for Arts and Technology (ConnCAT), Workforce Alliance/American Jobs Center, the New Haven Adult Education Center, Gateway Community College, United Way, Integrated Refugee & Immigration Services (IRIS) and Career Resources Inc., as well as our Anchor Partners (Yale University, Yale-New Haven Hospital, and the City of New Haven). New Haven Works also includes the Connecticut Department of Labor among its partners--the agency provides funding for job coaching and other services to New Haven Works members.
Board Chair
Jorge Perez
Company Affiliation State of Connecticut Banking Commission
Term Dec 2012 to Dec 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Bruce Alexander Yale University
Toni Harp City of New Haven
Desi Kelly Community Volunteer
Laurie Kennington Local 34, UNITE HERE at Yale
Lisette Martinez Yale-New Haven Hospital
Robert Proto Central Labor Council
Anthony Rescigno Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 4
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Standing Committees
Finance
CEO Comments
This Board of Directors reflects the commitment from the business and employer communities (Chamber of Commerce, Yale University, Yale-New Haven Health), government (Mayor), the New Haven community (a community representative) and labor.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $895,295.00
Projected Expenses $923,392.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902015
Form 9902014
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Letter
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Annual Report2014View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$243,746$165,164--
Government Contributions$492,251$447,980$0
Federal$416,773$397,980
State$75,478$50,000
Local----
Unspecified----
Individual Contributions------
------
$309,179----
Investment Income, Net of Losses$150$373--
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$221----
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$917,367$464,882--
Administration Expense$42,228$36,239--
Fundraising Expense$581$672--
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.091.22--
Program Expense/Total Expenses96%93%--
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%--
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$257,323$189,216--
Current Assets$229,238$156,095--
Long-Term Liabilities$13,753$8,245--
Current Liabilities$42,439$65,211--
Total Net Assets$201,131$115,760--
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountState of CT Dept. of Labor $416,773State of CT Dept. of Labor $397,980--
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountYale University $117,256Yale University $59,470--
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCity of New Haven $75,478City of New Haven $50,000--
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities5.402.39--
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets5%4%--
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments
From November 2012 to September 2014, the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven was the fiduciary agent for New Haven Works. New Haven Works received 501(3) non-profit status in August 2014. Therefore, NHW does not have its own audit documents for FY12 and FY13.
 
Address 205 Whitney Avenue, Suite 106
New Haven, CT 065113797
Primary Phone 203 562-9000
CEO/Executive Director Melissa Mason
Board Chair Jorge Perez
Board Chair Company Affiliation State of Connecticut Banking Commission

 

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