Social Communication Foundation
335 Audubon Court
New Haven CT 06510-1208
Contact Information
Address 335 Audubon Court
New Haven, CT 06510-1208
Telephone (203) 605-8727 x
E-mail catherine@socialcommunicationfoundation.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The mission of the Social Communication Foundation is to meet the 21 Century need to improve communications between socially challenged people and socially skilled people and to reduce the likelihood of bullying in the environments where they learn, live, and work.

We know that bright people with social communication challenges resulting from autism, learning disabilities, attention deficits, and other disorders are our most targeted individuals for bullying and abuse. They are people with invisible social disabilities; often considered weird, and mistreated because they are academically proficient or articulate and presumed to know better.

By improving understanding and skills between socially challenged and socially skilled people, everyone benefits for the long term. Bullying will decrease, student suicide and homicide will decrease, school and workplace attendance will improve, talents among those socially challenged will be utilized more effectively, managers will have more advanced skills, and productivity will improve.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2011
Former Names
Inclusion Teaming Corp.
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Catherine Hogan
Board Chair Catherine Sharafanowich
Board Chair Company Affiliation Cornell-Scott Hill Health Corporation, New Haven CT
Financial Summary
 
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Social Communication Foundation is to meet the 21 Century need to improve communications between socially challenged people and socially skilled people and to reduce the likelihood of bullying in the environments where they learn, live, and work.

We know that bright people with social communication challenges resulting from autism, learning disabilities, attention deficits, and other disorders are our most targeted individuals for bullying and abuse. They are people with invisible social disabilities; often considered weird, and mistreated because they are academically proficient or articulate and presumed to know better.

By improving understanding and skills between socially challenged and socially skilled people, everyone benefits for the long term. Bullying will decrease, student suicide and homicide will decrease, school and workplace attendance will improve, talents among those socially challenged will be utilized more effectively, managers will have more advanced skills, and productivity will improve.
Background

The Social Communication Foundation opened its doors in 2010 in order to 1) fill the gap in service for young people with social communication challenges, and 2) to offset the debilitating experiences of bullying that further compromise the ability of these young people to succeed.

According to the National Institute of Health, the number of young people with social communication challenges is increasing at an alarming rate, and while most of these young people are bright, their outcomes for employment and independent living are poor. During their development, these young people are included (accepted) in classrooms and after school activities, but they are not integrated (equal voice) in their schools or communities.

Young people with social communication challenges have difficulties in social reciprocity (knowing what to say, how to say it, and to whom to say it) and in the contextualization of language (word meanings, implied meanings, and expected responses), both verbal and non-verbal. The lack of success for these young people results from misperceptions about their challenges, bullying and isolation suffered during their school careers, restrictions on access to social skills training, and the absence of curriculum-based practice with socially skilled peers throughout their school careers.

Using our Inclusion Teaming Process™, a unique social communication development process, socially challenged and socially skilled young people come together to improve their communication skills and discover strategies that bridge their differences. Our programs are designed by age and skill level and provide practice and experience among people who communicate in remarkably different ways.

We have run three successful pilot programs with participants who came from around the state. We have spoken to stakeholders in mental health and urban communities about the potential for empowering two groups of marginalized young people at one time. Many young people with challenges in areas other than social communication can share leadership that promotes their wellbeing.

We envision centers for social communication around the country, with input on curriculum from experts around the world. Teaching interns, professionals in all fields, and employers will see and learn what people with remarkably different minds can achieve when given structured and supported opportunities to interact and learn from each other.

Impact

PAST ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

Our organization is young, but our founder brings decades of experience working with special needs children, as a school social worker, an assistant school administrator, a supervising clinician at the Yale Child Study Center, and an educational/anti-bullying advocate. Through her broad experience, our founder has:
1. Identified major flaws in the way our brightest youth with brain-based social communication challenges are integrated into society.
2. Translated knowledge of the problem into realistic and affordable solutions.
3. Created a Board of Directors composed of professionals who are: a) parents or relatives of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other disorder affecting social communication, b) young adults and professionals diagnosed with these disorders who bring their experience, knowledge, and leadership to our efforts, and c) professionals in the public school system.
4. Ran a total of three pilot "Beyond Differences" programs in the past 3 years, one per year, engaging a total of 36 students.

CURRENT GOALS:

In the next year we aim to:
1. Increase the visibility of our young organization in greater New Haven and throughout Connecticut.
2. Directly engage former participants and newly interested parents  (our consumers/customers) in management planning for the growth of the organization—the"Insiders & Outliers" project.
3. Develop strategies to grow program funding for financial aid to inner-city young people with ASD and other disorders affecting social communication.
4. Design software for immediate use by program participants in acquiring and analyzing data in real time.
5. Write a training of trainers’ manual to be used for training local communities in program delivery the following year.
Needs
In order for our organization to grow, we are in urgent need of:
* Board members with strategic planning and outreach experience.
 
* $3,000 to support outreach through visual effects and social media (video of testimonials), and website re-design.
 
* $24,000 to support the time our founder will need to write the training of trainers manual (16 weeks at $1,500 per week).
 
* $2,500 to support our new series of decision making management meetings, "Insiders and Outliers", starting Dec 1 2014 at Notre Dame High School, West Haven (room reservation, snacks, paper, printing costs, advertisement).
 
 
CEO Statement
Social Communication is a 21st century concept. The Social Communication Foundation recognized the needs of young people with social interaction challenges two years before the DSM 5 introduced the term as a disorder.

Social communication involves invisible brains processes and when these genetic processes result is communication behaviors that do not fit the norm, peers and some professionals are quick to judge the cause of these behaviors as attention seeking, poor parent upbringing, or worse, arrogance.

I became interested in brain-based disabilities at Smith College where I joined the college’s 504 committee, edited their Special Needs Catalogue, and became an active speaker about assumptions in the absence of knowledge. Later working as a certified school social worker, clinical supervisor at the Yale Child Study Center, assistant school administrator, and educational advocate, I met numerous families whose children were bright, struggling with social interaction, getting bullied, and having no service available to help them.

I was also president of the Connecticut Association of School Social Workers and a member of the Governor’s Task Force on Bullying at the time that the Columbine shooting took place. It was from that time on that I worked to find a solution to building skills for students that had difficulty interacting with socially skilled peers, were often mercilessly bullied, and were often judged by adults as too weird for help. Interestingly, 60-65% of their socially skilled peers did not engage in bullying them. Students who do not bully would be our greatest resource for a co-teaching/co-learning model for social communication development.

Among our early participants were students who had suffered broken arms, a broken nose, and/or chronic torment from peers. Two young people had been home schooled as a result of bullying. Participation by socially skilled peers was remarkable given the number of snow days that had to be made up. One time, socially skilled peers who had lost a peer to cancer the day before, came anyway despite their fatigue. For an average of 16 hours of training, the increased confidence of socially challenged participants was obvious.

There are no co-learning/co-teaching models for developing social communication skills available for young people or for adults, and yet, with opportunities for practicing social engagement, outcomes for socially challenged young people can improve. Participants in our programs engage openly and creatively, and they say, “This program needs to grow everywhere.”

Board Chair Statement

The Social Communication Foundation (SCF) started with Catherine Hogan’s passion for children and young adults who struggle with communication and social interaction. Her investment of time and personal resources has created the Inclusion Teaming process and proven its value through several pilot groups.

The challenges now before us are to:

Create a Train-the-Trainer manual and process to scale the program greater reach and impact

Create appropriate administrative infrastructure to maintain quality and oversight as we grow

Develop a financially viable and sustainable program for those who need services, including those unable to pay, or unable to pay the full cost.

Successfully partner with others to deliver high quality programs

Conduct ongoing assessments and research for quality improvement and to advance knowledge, understanding, and remediation of communication challenges

We seek funding for the creation and publication of the Train-the-Trainer manual, for administration and infrastructure. As a young non-profit, we seek Board members with expertise in strategic planning, development, finance, personnel, and corporate compliance.

Eventually we will need office space and access to space to deliver our programs, including preliminary interviews, training and coaching of group directors and student peers, pre and post-meeting planning and parent support. We ultimately see regional centers from which services can be offered to young in public and private schools as well as adults who can benefit.  Our current association with several academic advisors will inform data collection and research to continually improve our course offerings and outcomes.

We seek to add a new paradigm to address the social communications needs of our children. We provide our socially challenged children an emotionally corrective experience where socially skilled peers participate as co-learners in the development of the potential for their peers.  It is this platform of invested and courageous learners that sets in motion the excitement and motivation for how much more one can learn when safety and discovery abound.

 
                                                                                         
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Mental Health Treatment
Secondary Organization Category Education / Educational Services
Tertiary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Leadership Development
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
Greater New Haven, Fairfield Counties 
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Social Communication is a 21st century concept. The Social Communication Foundation recognized the needs of young people with social interaction challenges two years before the DSM 5 introduced the term as a disorder.

Social communication involves invisible brains processes and when these genetic processes result is communication behaviors that do not fit the norm, peers and some professionals are quick to judge the cause of these behaviors as attention seeking, poor parent upbringing, or worse, arrogance.

I became interested in brain-based disabilities at Smith College where I joined the college’s 504 committee, edited their Special Needs Catalogue, and became an active speaker about assumptions in the absence of knowledge. Later working as a certified school social worker, clinical supervisor at the Yale Child Study Center, assistant school administrator, and educational advocate, I met numerous families whose children were bright, struggling with social interaction, getting bullied, and having no service available to help them.

I was also president of the Connecticut Association of School Social Workers and a member of the Governor’s Task Force on Bullying at the time that the Columbine shooting took place. It was from that time on that I worked to find a solution to building skills for students that had difficulty interacting with socially skilled peers, were often mercilessly bullied, and were often judged by adults as too weird for help. Interestingly, 60-65% of their socially skilled peers did not engage in bullying them. Students who do not bully would be our greatest resource for a co-teaching/co-learning model for social communication development.

Among our early participants were students who had suffered broken arms, a broken nose, and/or chronic torment from peers. Two young people had been home schooled as a result of bullying. Participation by socially skilled peers was remarkable given the number of snow days that had to be made up. One time, socially skilled peers who had lost a peer to cancer the day before, came anyway despite their fatigue. For an average of 16 hours of training, the increased confidence of socially challenged participants was obvious.

There is a significant absence of social communication services available for young people and we aim to fill that gap. We would like to have sessions videotaped (with permissions) so that parents, future participants, funders, and educators can see the students engage openly, honestly, can creatively.

Friendship potential increases as social communications skills develop.

Programs
Description

This program is a preparatory program. Children ages 8-10 who are socially challenged come together to expand their interests, identify their strengths, and explore ways to use those strengths in relating effectively with others. The children build skills for sustaining confidence in a world of socially skilled communicators who perceive and use information differently than they do.

Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Other Health/Disability / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Parents will report improvement in child's outlook; in their ability to make positive contributions within group settings; and in knowledge about their strengths and challenges.

Participants will report positive understanding about their similarities and differences with more socially adept peers and noticeable improvement in the ability to integrate with their peers in school.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

All programs are designed to cover the continuum of skills needed for social development. Some people need only gain confidence to navigate a world with many different communicators. Other people require more extensive practice in responding effectively to others different than them. Others may need to identify the tools they need to support their ability to work and live independently. Finally, others may need improved skills in anticipating and predicting the expectations of those with whom they may live or work.

Therefore, participants are evaluated at the end of each program and may be encouraged to continue in additional programs that can advance their skills in other areas of identified need.

The Long Term Goals are:

· Improved communications in school, family, community, and workplace settings

· More effective response to police personnel and bullies

· Higher rates of employment and job sustainment

· Greater engagement in community life

· Increase in leadership roles

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Funding is needed for program implementation.
 
Description

Young people who are socially challenged learn and practice skills for school and workplace success with socially skilled peers. Groups are formed based on age and skill level. They learn how each other sees, understands, and expresses information about the world. They learn strategies for bridging their communication differences.

The curriculum provides current research on brain based communication difference and small and large group discussion about how to apply this research to their cross-peer communication. Guided instruction in used to facilitate known strategies and those developed during their interactions.


Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Other Health/Disability / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

By the end of 16 hours, 15 classes, 95% of all participants will:


· Demonstrate increased confidence in their communications with those different than themselves.

· Express reduced anxiety within the group of socially diverse communicators.

· Speak in a presentation format in front of the group regarding observations of their own and others progress in communicating.

· Respond in bullying situations with language that diminishes their risk of harm.

· Self advocate more effectively.

· Identify their strengths in learning environments

· Compliment and expand on the ideas expressed by others

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

All programs are designed to cover the continuum of skills needed for social development. Some people need only gain confidence to navigate a world with many different communicators. Other people require more extensive practice in responding effectively to others different than them. Others may need to identify the tools they need to support their ability to work and live independently. Finally, others may need improved skills in anticipating and predicting the expectations of those with whom they may live or work.

Therefore, participants are evaluated at the end of each program and may be encouraged to continue in additional programs that can advance their skills in other areas of identified need.

The Long Term Goals are:

· Improved communications in school, family, community, and workplace settings

· More effective response to police personnel and bullies

· Higher rates of employment and job sustainment

· Greater engagement in community life

· Increase in leadership roles

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Difficulties in communication can be difficult to capture.  So we work in two ways to capture the students success and challenges in communicating with others who may be quite different in their thinking and responding.  
 
1. Participants are actively involved in keeping data on pre set goals that are important to social pragmatics, team solidarity, and thinking/responding to the expressed ideas of their teammates.   
 
2. Facilitators and some participants sit after each meeting and note their observations of where members of the team showed good progress and appeared to stumble.   
 
Until such time that the meeting can be recorded (parent hesitant to give permission), this preset and constructive observational measures enable us to capture participants' challenge and success.  We then  use this information to arrange the large and small group formations for the next session.  
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

"After working with a SCF summer project, our son began to make significant gains on the social front. We received positive reports about his progress from the college he was attending."

"After college, nothing in the real world offered the same inspiration as the SCF program. He now trains others and looks forward to attending meetings. "

"Everyone that knew him was shocked to see the transformation. This was a child that always went along and did not believe in himself/ then, he just started blossoming when he went through the SCF program."

"My son now has the confidence to interact more successfully with his neuro-typical peers and potential employers as a result of this wonderful course, and the level of his self-esteem has been raised significantly."

"Your including my son as a participant and then in leadership of the program has given him a chance to see himself in a positive light and feel valued for his contribution. He is coming to accept the areas he excels alongside those more difficult for him."

"As a volunteer participant in the program, the kids on the spectrum helped me learn and grow; for this, I am thankful."

"I was a socially skilled volunteer in the Beyond Differences program. I wish there were more programs of the Social Communication Foundation like this all over the world; their message is something that is truly special."

"The Beyond Differences program boosted my son’s confidence and expanded his knowledge “of how to function beyond high school in the real world” — by teaching him the things he could not get anywhere else in my opinion, he is ready to go onto the “next steps.”"

Description

Young men and women who are socially challenged develop and practice life management skills with supportive suggestions from socially skilled peers who describe what works best with them. Both groups of young people learn to adjust their responses to minds that think and learn differently than they do. The curriculum is focused on life skills such as living with others; hygiene and heath upkeep; asking for supports as needed, self advocating for one's own needs; assessing time management skills; and introductions to people who may know nothing about communication challenges.

Population Served Adults / Other Health/Disability / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

By the end of this 16-week course, participants will:

· Understand the differences between 504 accommodations and special education entitlements.

· Demonstrate understanding of the college academic assistance process and how to build in appropriate supports.

· Have a portfolio of their strengths and how they can be helpful in college and community setting.

· Know their task management skills and the supports needed.

· Express their communication perspectives clearly to others.

· Make an outline of what is needed for living successfully with roommates.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

All programs are designed to cover the continuum of skills needed for social development. Some people need only gain confidence to navigate a world with many different communicators. Other people require more extensive practice in responding effectively to others different than them. Others may need to identify the tools they need to support their ability to work and live independently. Finally, others may need improved skills in anticipating and predicting the expectations of those with whom they may live or work.

Therefore, participants are evaluated at the end of each program and may be encouraged to continue in additional programs that can advance their skills in other areas of identified need.

The Long Term Goals are:

· Improved communications in school, family, community, and workplace settings

· More effective response to police personnel and bullies

· Higher rates of employment and job sustainment

· Greater engagement in community life

· Increase in leadership roles

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Will be similar to the monitoring in the Beyond Differences Program.
Description

Young people who are socially challenged explore ways to use their strengths for earning income. Socially skilled college students share in developing innovative ideas for the new global market, using talents, interests, and strengths as their guide. Using readings and videos on simple to complex job creations, participants then explore ways they might overcome personal and societal blocks to success. Participants then outline a basic business/strategy plan for developing their careers of choice. Embedded in the curriculum in the continued use of strategies for bridging communication differences.


Population Served Adults / Other Health/Disability / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

At the end of 15 weeks, participants will have:

· Compiled a comprehension list of how they can apply their strengths to income potential.

· Articulated the necessary attitudes for overcoming mistakes and or failures as they venture into new opportunities

· Expressed several ideas and or companies in which they believe they can earn income.

· Outlined the key elements in moving forward with their anticipated career.

· A clear picture of managed independence and and able to articulate what they need to their family, friends, and future employers.

· A self developed resource list of all software supports currently available and how they can help them remain focused and on task.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

All programs are designed to cover the continuum of skills needed for social development. Some people need only gain confidence to navigate a world with many different communicators. Other people require more extensive practice in responding effectively to others different than them. Others may need to identify the tools they need to support their ability to work and live independently. Finally, others may need improved skills in anticipating and predicting the expectations of those with whom they may live or work.

Therefore, participants are evaluated at the end of each program and may be encouraged to continue in additional programs that can advance their skills in other areas of identified need.

The Long Term Goals are:

· Improved communications in school, family, community, and workplace settings

· More effective response to police personnel and bullies

· Higher rates of employment and job sustainment

· Greater engagement in community life

· Increase in leadership roles

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Will be similar to the monitoring in the Beyond Differences Program. 
Description

People who are socially challenged come together with graduate students who are socially skilled and review existing technology tools for executive functions and social interaction challenges used for elderly and educational supports. The group evaluates these tools for application to the personal needs of participants with challenges and develops software designs. Additionally, the group explores streamlined digital access to create live coaching for addressing social communication challenges that may occur during employment and independent living.


Population Served At-Risk Populations / Adults / People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Participants with Social Communication Challenges will have:

· A list of strategies for helping manage difficulties with prioritizing and completing tasks.

· A list of strategies for responding to difficult social situations until such time as their virtual or live coach can be reached.

· A resource manual of people and ideas that can be referenced for help with their needs for managed independence.

Participants who are Socially Skilled with have:

· Strategies for assisting members of their communities who have organizational and social communication needs.

· Advanced management skills for facilitating the participation of all members in group situations.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

All programs are designed to cover the continuum of skills needed for social development. Some people need only gain confidence to navigate a world with many different communicators. Other people require more extensive practice in responding effectively to others different than them. Others may need to identify the tools they need to support their ability to work and live independently. Finally, others may need improved skills in anticipating and predicting the expectations of those with whom they may live or work.

Therefore, participants are evaluated at the end of each program and may be encouraged to continue in additional programs that can advance their skills in other areas of identified need.

The Long Term Goals are:

· Improved communications in school, family, community, and workplace settings

· More effective response to police personnel and bullies

· Higher rates of employment and job sustainment

· Greater engagement in community life

· Increase in leadership roles

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Will be similar to that used in the Beyond Differences program.

Description

Adults who are socially challenged may continue to have limited opportunities to connect with others outside of their home, school, or work responsibilities. Project Recreation is an interest-based activity program shared by socially skilled communicators and socially challenged communicators. Interests areas include film, geology, baseball, music, cooking, meteorology, fundraising for meaningful causes, and more. The number of interest areas is unlimited. Men and women have a safe place to meet one another and share their mutual interests. Members decide their group logos, recreational activities, and community involvement. Workshops are provided for advancing individual leadership.

Population Served / /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Depending on the mix of people, participants will:

· Design the program according to their needs.

· Share activity interests with others.

· Identify community support and resources.

· Offer workshops for building community awareness, as they deem necessary.

· Create displays of their work for viewing by the community.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

All programs are designed to cover the continuum of skills needed for social development. Some people need only gain confidence to navigate a world with many different communicators. Other people require more extensive practice in responding effectively to others different than them. Others may need to identify the tools they need to support their ability to work and live independently. Finally, others may need improved skills in anticipating and predicting the expectations of those with whom they may live or work.

Therefore, participants are evaluated at the end of each program and may be encouraged to continue in additional programs that can advance their skills in other areas of identified need.

The Long Term Goals are:

· Improved communications in school, family, community, and workplace settings

· More effective response to police personnel and bullies

· Higher rates of employment and job sustainment

· Greater engagement in community life

· Increase in leadership roles

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Will be similar to the process used in the Beyond Differences program.
Program Comments
CEO Comments
CEO/Executive Director
Catherine Hogan
Term Start July 2010
Email catherine@socialcommunicationfoundation.org
Experience In process
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 2
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 2
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation N/A
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Board Chair
Catherine Sharafanowich
Company Affiliation Cornell-Scott Hill Health Corporation, New Haven CT
Term Sept 2013 to Aug 2015
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Jenifer Blemings New Haven Public Schools
Genna Lewis Department of Developmental Services, State of Connecticut
Lee Morrisey Community volunteer
Stephen Mark Shore Adelphi University
John J. Smith retired high school principal
Brendan Wendt Community volunteer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 3 3 Board Members are Disabled
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 3
Female 4
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 6
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 90%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
CEO Comments
We are fortunate to have some exciting possibilities ahead.
 
Stephen Mark Shore, one of our board members, has been in contact with Kevin Custer at the Autism Society of America and Arc Capital Development (Arc is a private global early-stage venture firm that invests in and operates companies in the preK through K-12 education and Special Needs marketplace). Stephen has been speaking with Kevin about our program and possible financial support. We hope to be hear from both Stephen and Kevin soon. Stephen Mark Shore has always been open to being a chief investigator on a research project and we anticipate that will have his skills when writing a grant for research on our work.
 
Nathalie Bonafe who has had a long career as a biomedical research scientist has recently volunteered to assist our organization. Nathalie brings a rich background on meaningful data collection and medical grant writing. Nathalie will assist the organization in grant writing that will help sustain the organization and provide services to many more students.
 
Our challenges include funding for marketing, service programs, and salaries. In addition, we believe we are creating a new paradigm to help the growing social communication diversity in our country. In addition to sending children who have social interaction challenges to therapists, we will have the opportunity to send these children to a training center where they engage socially skilled peers for advancing their skills. It makes intuitive sense that students need to practice any skill before it can be used effectively independent. The challenge we face with this new paradigm is the newness of the idea. People fear the loss of clients or the challenge to their services, when in fact our services are supplemental and do not replace the wonder direct one to one or group services currently in place.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Sept 01 2014
Fiscal Year End Aug 31 2015
Projected Revenue
Projected Expenses
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$3,123$1,285$575
Administration Expense$990$792$10,358
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.103.770.54
Program Expense/Total Expenses76%62%5%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$2,178$5,891$148
Current Assets------
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$21,913$21,913$21,913
Total Net Assets$21,913$21,913$21,913
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.000.000.00
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Goal $250,000.00
Dates Apr 2015 to Mar 2018
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 335 Audubon Court
New Haven, CT 065101208
Primary Phone 203 605-8727
CEO/Executive Director Catherine Hogan
Board Chair Catherine Sharafanowich
Board Chair Company Affiliation Cornell-Scott Hill Health Corporation, New Haven CT

 

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