America's VetDogs - The Veteran's K-9 Corps.
371 E Jericho Turnpike
Smithtown NY 11787-2906
Contact Information
Address 371 E Jericho Turnpike
Smithtown, NY 11787-2906
Telephone (631) 930-9000 x
Fax 631-930-9009
E-mail info@vetdogs.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
America's VetDogs' mission is to help those who have served our country honorably to live with dignity and independence, whether they are visually impaired or have other special needs, through the use of assistance dogs. 
 
America's VetDogs provides independence, mobility and companionship for veterans and military personnel of all eras - from World War II to those recently wounded in active conflicts abroad - who are visually impaired or have other disabilities, through the use of guide, service, facility, therapy and companion dogs. 
 
Both guide and service dogs enable veterans to reclaim their independence and maximize the value they provide to their families, communities and country.  For many combat-wounded survivors, success will be to live independently, achieving the highest quality of life possible with a realized hope for employment.  Veterans with disabilities often have limited access to traditional employment, need flexible work schedules, or need a more accommodating work environment.  Guide or service dogs provide a unique opportunity for our nation's hereos to continue their education and/or return to work.
 
Freedom is precious to Americans.  Our applicants, students and graduates valiantly fought to preserve it.  With your support, America's VetDogs can continue to answer the call for our servicemen and women and provide them the support they deserve. 

 
A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.

SUPPORT THE CLASS OF 2019

The Guide Dog Foundation and America’s VetDogs are committed to providing our special dogs free of charge to people across North America with disabilities. Beginning February 26, 2018 and running through June 2019, our goal is to raise $500,000 to change more lives through the partnership of a guide or service dog. However, we can’t train and place these dogs on our own – we need YOUR help!

You can provide life-changing guide and service dogs to those who need them by donating today.

A Great Opportunity Ending Date June 30 2019
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2007
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. John Miller
Board Chair Mr. Donald Dea
Board Chair Company Affiliation Fusion Products
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
America's VetDogs' mission is to help those who have served our country honorably to live with dignity and independence, whether they are visually impaired or have other special needs, through the use of assistance dogs. 
 
America's VetDogs provides independence, mobility and companionship for veterans and military personnel of all eras - from World War II to those recently wounded in active conflicts abroad - who are visually impaired or have other disabilities, through the use of guide, service, facility, therapy and companion dogs. 
 
Both guide and service dogs enable veterans to reclaim their independence and maximize the value they provide to their families, communities and country.  For many combat-wounded survivors, success will be to live independently, achieving the highest quality of life possible with a realized hope for employment.  Veterans with disabilities often have limited access to traditional employment, need flexible work schedules, or need a more accommodating work environment.  Guide or service dogs provide a unique opportunity for our nation's hereos to continue their education and/or return to work.
 
Freedom is precious to Americans.  Our applicants, students and graduates valiantly fought to preserve it.  With your support, America's VetDogs can continue to answer the call for our servicemen and women and provide them the support they deserve. 

 
Background
When it was founded in 1946, one of the Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind's tenets was to provide the gift of Second Sight to blinded Veterans of World War II.  As we entered the new millennium, it became evident that more and more people would need assistance dogs that could do more than guide.  In an effort to meet consumers' additional needs, the Foundation began training dogs to provide stability and balance and perform other service-related tasks such as fetching and retrieving and working alongside wheelchairs. 
 
At the same time, American soldiers began returning home from the war on terrorism with life-altering injuries.  As a response to the growing number of post-911 veterans applying for our dogs and the aging of older veterans with disabilities from all eras, the Board of Directors gave them top priority as recipients of our service dogs.  From this prioritization, America's VetDogs - The Veteran's K-9 Corps began in 2003 as a sister organization to the Guide Dog Foundation, and in 2007 became its own 501(c)(3) organization. 
 
Headquartered in Smithtown, New York, at the Foundation's ten-acre campus, facilities includes a training center with kennel space for up to 174 dogs; National administration center and student union; student residence hall with 17 private rooms and private baths, internet and phone access; and a breeding facility and puppy nursery.  The Foundation breeds its own pure Labrador and Golden Retrievers, first-generation Labrador/Golden crosses, Standard Poodles for those with allergies and specific breeding of German Shepherds and Shepherd/Collie crosses.
 
 
Impact

This year, thousands of people including Americans veterans and active military with disabilities and their families will be directly impacted through the Guide Dog Foundation. This includes people partnering with guide and service dogs, servicemen and women at military hospitals and VA centers as well as persons benefiting from therapy and facility dogs.

The service dog programs of America’s VetDogs® were created to provide enhanced mobility and renewed independence to veterans, active-duty service members, and first responders with disabilities, allowing them to once again live with pride and self-reliance. Not only does a service dog provide support with daily activities, it provides the motivation to tackle every day challenges.
VetDogs trains and places service dogs for those with physical disabilities; guide dogs for individuals who are blind or have low vision; service dogs to help mitigate the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder; hearing dogs for those who have lost their hearing, and facility dogs as part of the rehabilitation process in military and VA hospitals.
It costs over $50,000 to breed, raise, train, and place one assistance dog; however, all of VetDogs’ services are provided at no charge to the individual. Funding comes from the generosity of individuals, corporations, foundations, businesses, and community organizations.
 
America’s VetDogs and its founding organization, the Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind, were the first assistance dog schools in the United States to be accredited by both the International Guide Dog Federation and Assistance Dogs International, the two international regulatory bodies that certify guide and service dog schools on a voluntary basis.  Through a close relationship with the VA and Military Medical Centers, America's wounded service members receive dogs that provide safety, mobility, balance and stability.  Guide dogs help veterans with visual disabilities move about safely and confidently.  Service dogs pick up dropped articles, open doors, push elevator buttons, warn of seizures, pull wheelchairs and act as "walking canes' for veterans with amputations and balance problems.  In addition, facility and therapy service dogs are trained to accompany physical and occupational therapists at military medical centers and work with many of the wounded warriors in rehabilitation.  We have successfully trained veterans with blindness, spinal cord injuries, hearing impairments, limb loss, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injuries.  
Needs

We estimate the cost to breed, train, and place a guide or service dog, combined with the training, transportation and housing of the team (recipient and dog), and a lifetime of aftercare services is in excess of $50,000 per team, and all services and equipment are provided free of charge to blind, or otherwise disabled persons. We receive no government funding, and depend completely on generous donors and supporters to continue our services, and expand our ability to serve the increasing numbers of disabled persons requesting our specially trained dogs.

 
Both guide and service dogs enable Veterans to reclaim their independence, increase, and in some cases restore, their mobility and regain confidence so they can once again actively participate in the diverse lives they led prior to their injuries.  Our graduates are husbands and fathers, wives and mothers, sons and daughters.  They are athletes, musicians, students, and professionals, and they are all soldiers, warriors and heroes.  
 
CEO Statement
I am grateful for the trust and confidence the boards of directors have placed in me to take America’s VetDogs and the Guide Dog Foundation to the next level as the leaders in the assistance dog movement, and I welcome your ideas and continued support of us and the veterans we serve.
John Miller
President & Chief Executive Officer
Board Chair Statement
We’re proud to provide the guide and service dogs that change lives … that provide a fresh beginning. Thank you for joining with us to help disabled veterans live without boundaries.
Sincerely,
Don Dea
Chair of the Board
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Animal Related / Animal Training
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Centers to Support the Independence of Specific Populations
Areas Served
National
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
We provide guide and service dogs to veterans of all eras throughout the United States.  All dogs, equipment, training, transportation to our training campus, and a lifetime of aftercare support to the handler/dog team are provided free of charge. 
Programs
Description
Service dogs help increase the mobility and independence of a person with a disability other than visual.  PTSD dogs are specially trained to help mitigate the symptoms of PTSD in an effort to provide the emotional support a veteran might need.  Our service dogs are provided to veterans free of charge.  Certified staff trainers meticulously match the appropriate dog to the appropriate applicant, then individually train the dog to mitigate the specific disability/disabilities of the new owner.  
 
According to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a service animal must be individually trained to do work or perform tasks of benefit to a disabled individual in order to be legally elevated from pet status to service animal status. It is the specially trained tasks or work performed on command or cue that legally exempts a service dog [service animal] and his disabled handler from the “No Pets Allowed” policies of stores, restaurants and other places of public accommodation under the ADA.
Population Served Other Health/Disability / Elderly and/or Disabled / People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our goal for FY 2015 is to train 90 quality and safe guide dog teams and 50 dogs that work as service or therapy dogs.  During our FY 2015, thousands of people including disabled Americans, veterans and active military will be directly impacted through America's VetDogs and the Guide Dog Foundation.  This includes people partnering with guide or service dogs, servicemen and women at military hospitals and VA centers for physical and occupational therapy, and persons benefiting from therapy dogs. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Freedom is precious to Americans.  With their assistance dogs by their side a person with a disability no longer needs to ask for help with daily tasks many people take for granted.  America's VetDogs assists people overcome their unique challenges and remain safely mobile and independent. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Our overall measure of the services provided by America's VetDogs and the Guide Dog Foundation is not just the number of dogs placed as guide or assistance dogs, but also by the impact that our dogs have on the safety and independence of a blind or otherwise disabled person's life.  To ensure the success of our training and placement, evaluation of the services provided occurs throughout the process of breeding, raising, training, and placing our dogs.  America's VetDogs strives to keep our "successful placement" rate (dogs that remain paired with their handler two years post-graduation) at 90% or higher--a number higher than the norm for other assistance dog schools.  All graduates receive a lifetime of aftercare that includes follow-up visits with trainers in the field  or additional facility training as necessary. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
U.S. Army 1st Lt. Melissa Stockwell (Ret.) is an America's VetDogs graduate.  She says of her service dog, "When I get home after a long day and take my prostheitc leg off, he can bring me my crutches.  He can help me if I fall and climb stairs without a handrail.  Jake has made my life so much better.  He brings so much joy and I am so thankful for all his companionship and all he has added to my life."  Today, Ms. Stockwell is a sought-after motivational speaker and has appeared on national TV, on multiple magazine covers, and was invited to recite the Pledge of Allegience at the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library in Dallas, Texas.  She is also a competitive swimmer who competed on the US team in the 2008 Summer Paralympics.  Melissa is now a three-time paratriathlon world champion in the TR12 division as a member of the the US paratriathlon national team. 
Description Guide dogs help blind or visually impaired people get around in the world. To do this, a guide dog must know how to
  • Keep on a direct route ignoring all distractions such as smells, other animals and people
  • Maintain a steady pace
  • Stop at all curbs until told to proceed
  • Turn left and right, move forward and stop on command
  • Recognize and avoid obstacles that the handler won't be able to fit through (narrow passages and low overheads)
  • Stop at the bottom and top of stairs until told to proceed
  • Bring the handler to elevator buttons
  • Lie quietly when the handler is sitting
  • Help the handler to board and move around buses, subways and all forms of public transportation
  • Obey a number of verbal commands

Additionally, a guide dog must know to disobey any command that would put the handler in danger. This ability, called intelligent disobedience, is perhaps the most amazing thing about guide dogs; that they can balance obedience with their own assessment of the situation.

Population Served Other Health/Disability / Elderly and/or Disabled / People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Our goal for FY 2015 is to train 90 quality and safe guide dog teams and 50 dogs that work as service or therapy dogs.  During our FY 2015, thousands of people including disabled Americans, veterans and active military will be directly impacted through America's VetDogs and the Guide Dog Foundation.  This includes people partnering with guide or service dogs, servicemen and women at military hospitals and VA centers for physical and occupational therapy, and persons benefiting from therapy dogs. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Freedom is precious to Americans.  With their assitance dogs by their side a person with a disability no longer needs to ask for help with daily tasks many people take for granted.  America's VetDogs assits people to overcome their unique challenges and remain safely mobile and independent.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Our overall measure of the services provided by America's VetDogs and the Guide Dog Foundation is not just the number of dogs placed as guide or assistance dogs, but also by the impact that our dogs have on the safety and independence of a blind or otherwise disabled person's life.  To ensure the success of our training and placement, evaluation of the services provided occurs throughout the process of breeding, raising, training, and placing our dogs.  America's VetDogs strives to keep our "successful placement" rate (dogs that remain paired with their handler two years post-graduation) at 90% or higher--a number higher than the norm for other assistance dog schools.  All graduates receive a lifetime of aftercare that includes follow-up visits with trainers in the field  or additional facility training as necessary. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. The Guide Dog Foundation improves our consumers’ lives by providing people who are blind, visually impaired, or otherwise disabled with increased mobility, independence, and companionship. From the study Guide Dogs and the Visually Impaired: A Study of Trends, Usage, and Attributes of Guide Dog Users, conducted by Wedewer Research and Counsel: When asked to rate a list of benefits, the top two responses by participants were “moving around with more confidence” and companionship (82% each). Other benefits to having a guide dog included getting around faster (77%), getting around with fewer accidents (76%), getting around more accurately (74%), being less dependent on others to get around (73%), and feeling safer at home and on the streets (67%).
Description
In the Prison Puppy Programs, specially selected inmates, many of whom are veterans who served our country honorably, raise our puppies to become service dogs who will be placed with our nation's veterans with disabilities. The inmates, along with volunteer puppy raisers who take the puppies home for the weekend, teach basic obedience along with some service-based skills such as fetch and retrieval, opening and closing doors and balance support. We now have active programs in 11 prisons throughout Massachusetts, Maryland and most recently at Enfield Correctional Institution in Enfield, Connecticut.
 
Our Prison Puppy Programs have been vital in our efforts to build capacity to train and place our dogs with wounded American heroes of all eras. Research shows that prison-raised dogs tend to have higher success rates than those that are home-raised, inmates are able to provide more consistent training at a higher level simply because of the amount of time they are able to devote to the pups in training.
Population Served Other Health/Disability / Elderly and/or Disabled / People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
As a result of our focus on new training methods in prisons, which include teaching the dogs basic service dog tasks, once they "graduate" from the prison program and return to our campus, the advanced training time our staff needs to produce a successful assistance dog can by reduced by 50% (from 6 months to 2-3 months), thus allowing us to place the dogs with our veteran applicants at a faster rate.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Through our Prison Puppy Programs, our nation's heroes receive skilled assistance dogs, specially trained to perform tasks specific to the individual's needs and disabilities.  Inmate handlers are provided with skills they can use in their post-release employment as well as an opportunity to give back to society in a meaningful way.  Prisons benefit from a positive shift in attitude and atmosphere, truly making this program a win-win-win for all involved. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
"This is one of the most significant restorative justice projects I have even been involved with.  To have inmates - including incarcerated veterans - doing something this meaningful is beyond words.", says Gary Maynard, Secretary of Maryland's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
 
"I am so honored to be a part of this and so proud to know that what we are doing here will help a veteran.  It feels so good to know that we can give back and do something to help men and women that are coming back with so many problems.  This is just a small way I can redeem myself.", says Hazard Wilson, inmate trainer. 
Description Facility and therapy dogs are trained to provide assistance or therapeutic support for wounded warriors at military or VA hospitals. Under the supervision of a physical or occupational therapist, these dogs work with a variety of patients with a multitude of serious injuries both physical and mental. Reaching 150 to 250 patients a week, these dogs may help a soldier walk on prosthetic legs by providing balance, open a door for a veteran who uses a wheelchair or provide emotional support so a wounded warrior can heal both physically and mentally. Therapy dogs also make visits to VA nursing homes and hospices.
Population Served Other Health/Disability / Elderly and/or Disabled / People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Description Hearing dogs are for veterans who face hearing loss due to their military service, age, head trauma, virus or disease or other encounter.  A hearing dog recipient must have at least 30 percent hearing loss in both ears.  Hearing dogs are specifically trained to assist an individual by alerting their handlers to sounds such as a doorbell, a door knock, warn of an intruder, a smoke alarm and a time (cooking timer, microwave, etc.).  Each dog will be specifically trained to meet each individual's hearing needs, and additional tasks can be added by request.  
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled / Adults /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
CEO/Executive Director
Mr. John Miller
Term Start Mar 2018
Email John.Miller@vetdogs.org
Experience
Miller joins the Guide Dog Foundation and America’s VetDogs after serving as national president and CEO of the Tourette Association of America (TAA) for the past two years.  During his tenure, he set a new strategic direction for the TAA, which resulted in a significant improvement in financial performance.


Prior to TAA, Miller served with honor and distinction as CEO of the American Red Cross on Long Island during one of the most important periods in the organization's 100-year history. He directed the mergers of three independent chapters into one stronger organization and oversaw local responses to high-impact national events including Hurricane Irene and Superstorm Sandy, the two largest disasters in recent Long Island history.
“I am honored to work with both outstanding organizations and the entire team at this exciting time, and I look forward to creating even more dynamic and vibrant opportunities that improve the lives of people with disabilities,” Miller said. “I have developed a deep appreciation for the organizations’ people, values and heritage, and look forward to working collectively with everyone at the Guide Dog Foundation and America’s VetDogs.”
Miller has been recognized for his strong leadership and has been acknowledged as one of the most influential and brightest businessmen on Long Island. In 2015, he was chosen from a nationwide pool of candidates to participate in LEAD, the prestigious American Red Cross National Leadership Education and Development Program. Long Island Business News named him as an Outstanding CEO for 2014 and included him in their list of “40 under 40” in 2013.
Miller attended Hofstra University Frank G. Zarb School of Business where he earned his BBA and MBA. He is certified as a Senior Professional in Human Resources® by HR Certification Institute®.
 
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 73
Number of Part Time Staff 57
Number of Volunteers 1000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 95%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 130 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 0
Unspecified 130
Senior Staff
Title Chief Financial Officer
Title Chief Canine Care Officer
Title Chief of Training
Title Director of Development
Title Director of Administrative Services
Title Director of External Relations
Title Director of Marketing
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Social Responsibility AwardNew York Society of Association Executives2011
CyberSpace AwardNew York Society of Association Executives2011
"Power of A" Gold AwardThe Center for Association Leadership2011
Board Chair
Mr. Donald Dea
Company Affiliation Fusion Products
Term July 2015 to June 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. James C. BinghamTD Bank
Ms. Lynn Bissonnette
Mr. Alphonce J. Brown ACFRE
Mr. Travis J. Carey CPACarey LLC
Ms. Laura Casale AIA
Ms. Gretchen EvansRetired military
Ms. Deborah Firestone
Mr. Lee Hornstein
Mr. Wells B. Jones CAE, CFRE
Ms. Barbara J. Kelly Esq.
Mr. Arnold Lesser VMD
Mr. Robert S. Madden
Mr. Lucas Matthiessen LCSW, CASAC
Mr. Jim Mayer
Mr. Chris MontagninoVolunteer
Mr. Edward P. Nallan Jr.
Mr. John O'BrienVolunteer
Mr. Warren Palzer
Ms. Mary PorterVolunteer
Mr. Jack J. Sage
Mr. Bernard Sarisohn Esq.
Ms. Dona Sauerburger COMS
Mr. Robert T. Stratford Jr.
Mr. Glenn Tecker
Mr. Michael TroianoVolunteer
Ms. Heidi Vandewinckel LCSW
Mr. Peter WayVolunteer
Colonel E. David Woycik Jr.
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 27
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 21
Female 8
Standing Committees
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Audit
Board Development / Board Orientation
By-laws
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Investment
Personnel
Program / Program Planning
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2018
Fiscal Year End June 30 2019
Projected Revenue $6,133,638.00
Projected Expenses $6,128,100.00
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201720162015
Total Assets$1,088,047$700,395$735,852
Current Assets$814,687$700,395$735,852
Long-Term Liabilities$0$774,976$909,452
Current Liabilities$222,297$241,194$142,175
Total Net Assets$865,750($315,775)($315,775)
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201720162015
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments Today the Guide Dog Foundation for the Blind is faced with increased demands for our specially trained assistance dogs as the number of people with disabilities including the more than 50,000 veterans wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan grows.  It takes over two years to produce one assistance dog.  Given this neccessary length of time it takes to train effective service dogs, NOW is the time for the Guide Dog Foundation to build our capacity to serve the increasing number of people with disabilities who apply for our special dogs. Additional financial resources will expand our capacity to produce more highly trained dogs to meet the increased applications and need for assistance dogs, and to better meet the changing needs of our disabled community.
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 371 E Jericho Turnpike
Smithtown, NY 117872906
Primary Phone 631 930-9000
Contact Email info@vetdogs.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. John Miller
Board Chair Mr. Donald Dea
Board Chair Company Affiliation Fusion Products

 

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