108 Monkeys (known as Elm City Flow)
319 Peck Street Box D-12
New Haven CT 06513
Contact Information
Address 319 Peck Street Box D-12
New Haven, CT 06513-
Telephone (860) 836-2424 x
Fax 203-507-2750
E-mail contact@108monkeys.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

108 Monkeys is a movement of yoga service leaders promoting a culture of justice and peace, through yoga.


A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.
FREE outdoor yoga all summer long! View the updated schedule at www.108monkeys.org.
A Great Opportunity Ending Date Sept 01 2018
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2014
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Peg Oliveira PhD
Board Chair Dr. Peg Oliveira PhD
Board Chair Company Affiliation Gesell Institute of Child Development
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $20,000.00
Projected Expenses $20,000.00
Statements
Mission

108 Monkeys is a movement of yoga service leaders promoting a culture of justice and peace, through yoga.


Background

What is 108 Monkeys?

108 Monkeys is a yoga service organization with a social justice mission. 108 Monkeys trains and mentors yoga service leaders to implement evidence based yoga programs in service settings. Our partner sites, like schools, child care centers and mental health clinics, function as a laboratory of practice to better inform our trainings and improve our implementation outcomes, including increased academic achievement and lower rates of negative behavior incidents for middle and high school students.

Who is 108 Monkeys?

108 Monkeys was founded by four women who believe, as Martin Luther King Jr. said, that “true peace is not merely the absence of tension; it is the presence of justice.” Our Executive Director, and co-Founder, Peg Oliveira is a developmental psychologist with a career in social activism, specifically on issues of affordable child care, fair pay and paid family leave. Peg is also a veteran yoga teacher in her hometown of New Haven, Connecticut where she leads an invigorating and soulful power vinyasa yoga class.

Since its founding in 2012, 108 Monkeys has drawn a dedicated Board of Directors, composed of professionals from diverse disciplines such as education, health, psychology, law, mental health and marketing.

Why does the world need 108 Monkeys?

Stress is prevalent, in many forms. Social pressure, academic stress, trauma, poverty and violence are all norms of modern life. This is problematic because stress impacts the brain and its ability to maintain healthy relationships, receive new information and achieve a sense of wellbeing; in short it is a hindrance to living a peaceful and fulfilling life. Yoga reduces the impact of stress on the body and the brain. It increases activity in the parts of the brain that allow us to be creative, problem solve, self regulate and connect.

For example, in order for students to benefit from an education they need to arrive at school ready to learn. Yet, most students in our poorest communities arrive at school with brains and bodies impacted by the stress of trauma, poverty and violent communities. While yoga doesn’t remove the stressors, it can help grow more resilient brains and bodies, able to combat the negative impact of stress, and give students a step up toward being healthy and ready for school.

But the benefits of yoga cited are often least accessible to those who could most benefit. Barriers include culture, cost and convenience. The task of convincing urban youth that something their upper-middle class, middle-aged, white, women teachers do for fun can be “cool” is no small feat. There is little reflection of the bodies and beliefs of the men, youth and even women we work with in the yoga saturated media of Yoga Journal and YouTube. 108 Monkeys is an Equal Opportunity Engager. We try to overcome these barriers through our outreach programs and our culturally sensitive and trauma informed protocols and respond personally and creatively making yoga democratic and accessible.

Impact
Accomplishments:
* In all of the public school programs we have run over our five years in existence, students enrolled in our yoga achieved more academically than their peers in the same school who did not receive yoga (as measured by  GPA, teacher surveys, and/ or MAP reading scores).
* Pre-school teachers trained by us were able to successfully implement yoga into their classroom, resulting in BMI decreases for obese children.
* Suspensions and cutting class were reduced by over 60% for a cohort of New Haven 9th graders participating in mandatory yoga taught by our staff, as compared to the rates for prior 9th grade cohorts at the same school.
* Presented above findings to other educators at national conferences. 
*Granted scholarships for free attendance at our trainings to 37 Connecticut educators, as well as training over 40 other paying educators.
* Youth Leader Scholarship: raised over $3,900 to cover certification training, books, intern placement, and transportation costs for attendance by a gifted male high school student.  
* Obtained funding from a local mental health organization to implement our innovative trauma informed yoga protocol with their clients.
* Over our five years, we spent less than 1% of our budget on fundraising.
 
Goals for 2017-18:
* Develop a youth and young adult leadership program supporting mentorship and paid internships for our certified youth trainees in area summer camps and after-school programs.
* Gain the technical expertise to document, on video and in pictures, the impact of yoga demonstrated by our students and teachers. 
* Co-sponsor and fund, with the help of local schools, short term "sabbaticals" of social worker and educator trainees, to allow them to hone their yoga skills.
 
Needs
1. Office Assistance: enter data, follow up on free yoga requests, clean mats; the usual
2. Fundraising Gurus: Donated time to manage creative fundraisers
3. Database Entry & Data Collection, Entry and Analysis: local folks to crunch numbers
4. Grant Writers and Finders
5. Website / Social Media Pros
CEO Statement

What does 108 Monkeys do?

108 Monkeys trains and mentors yoga service leaders to implement evidence-based yoga programs in service settings. We are rigorous in our assessment process. Some results from our first three years include:

  • High school students, practicing yoga three times per week for one semester had reduced levels of cortisol, a stress hormone, after yoga, compared to pre-yoga measures.
  • A high school freshman class practicing yoga three times per week for one hour each session had fewer average weekly discipline referrals and fewer cut classes than the previous cohort of freshmen without yoga.
  • All freshman in an urban high school participated in mandatory yoga for the fall semester. Those participating in yoga the second semester had increased GPA’s their spring semester, compared to the fall semester. Those not participating in yoga the second semester had decreased GPA’s their spring semester, compared to the fall semester.
  • Urban preschoolers struggle with obesity in childhood. In a preschool cohort one child was identified as having a BMI in the obese range at the beginning of an 8 month yoga program, and three others were trending toward obesity. At the end of the yoga program, no preschoolers were identified as obese, or even trending toward obese.

How does 108 Monkeys do this?

Reclaim: Using culturally sensitive and trauma informed protocol and practices, we put yoga where people need it. We increase availability of yoga practices and communal yoga classes and trainings for all, regardless of resources, gender, language, sexual orientation or other societal barriers that may currently restrict participation.


Reframe: Using an evidence based set of neuro-restorative practices that ignite the parasympathetic nervous system, we offer tools for cooling the fires of stress and trauma. Additionally, we use yoga to ignite the prefrontal cortex and strengthen the creative parts of the brain that make us most human and able to solve problems, feel empathy and make moral choices. Yoga invites participation from the part of the brain that can step outside the box, see the truth and act with compassion, to achieve justice for ourselves and for others.


Research: Using rigorous methodology, we observe, assess, refine and redefine to untangle best practices and codify protocol. This is not dogma; quite the opposite. It is an openness to new information and a flexibility of implementation, within a structured evidence based body. In yoga, our mat is a laboratory of practice; a transitional space to commit to a discipline while also trying on new ways of thinking and being. We hold ourselves to the same spirit of investigation and rigor in our implementation, as we apply to our yoga practice. Without assumptions or expectations, we investigate problems of practice, focus on outcomes and adapt our practices and protocol when new information, or a new truth, points us in a new direction.

 Why 108? Why not more or less monkeys?

Across many traditions, religions and cultures, the number 108 represents wholeness, or spiritual completion. There are 108 beads on a mala, 108 beads on a rosary, 108 sounds in the Sanskrit alphabet, Hindu deities have 108 names, Stonehenge is 108 feet in diameter, the diameter of the sun is 108 times the diameter of the Earth, and there are 108 stitches on a baseball. The number 1 can be thought to represent the individual; the number 0 can represent the whole or the community; and 8 can represent infinity. Together they suggest that all things good and whole come in the complete package of 108.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Education / Secondary & High Schools
Secondary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Mental Health Treatment
Tertiary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Areas Served
New Haven
108 Monkeys calls New Haven home, and it is here where we hold our laboratories of practice. In New Haven schools, clinics, child care centers and shelters we implement our programs, and like good scientists, assess and improve, based on outcomes. The results are used in our trainings and our Street Bodhi trainees take these skills and passions beyond the city limits.
Programs
Description

Who said down dogs can't wag their tails? In our early childhood programs, we train staff from our partner pre-schools, after-school programs, and elementary schools to add yoga and "mindfulness snacks" to their class routines. Early childhood professionals are individually coached by community members with yoga expertise, learning developmentally appropriate and ways to help children build self-regulation skills. Not much yoga experience required for this training, just a willingness to get silly and get still.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / K-12 (5-19 years) / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Teacher reports of behavior problems and emotional states. 
Description Our middle and high school programs use yoga as a school climate change tool. We train, screen and certify 108 Monkeys yoga teachers in a trauma-informed curriculum. Administrators, teachers, student leaders, and community volunteers with yoga expertise first practice yoga at school together, learning practices that will ease their stress levels over a lifetime. Through a staged, 2-year implementation, the group grows its own contemplative culture from the ground up.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / K-12 (5-19 years) / Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our programs produce objectively measurable results, including higher scores on MAP reading tests, 66% decrease in behavior problems, improved student engagement as measured by cutting classes or absenteeism, and lower BMI.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Better self-regulation, concentration, and decision making 
Increased prefrontal cortex functioning
Increased academic and life outcomes 
Decreased imbalances in production of cortisol (a stress hormone)
Increased production of BDNF (a biochemical that aids brain function) 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Grades and Standardized Tests
Behavior and Attendance Reports
Teacher Reports
Student surveys 
Bio Markers (i.e., cortisol testing)
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Students who took yoga the first semester and not the second semester  saw a decline in average GPA from 2.5 to 2.4. Students who participated in yoga both first and second semester saw an increase in average GPA from 2.65 to 2.75.

The number of student earning honors in January at the end of the mandatory yoga semester were greater for the 9th grade participating in yoga than for all other grades not participating in yoga.

The number of student earning Not Ready (Mastery Grade equivalent of failing) in at least 1 core academic class in January at the end of the mandatory yoga semester were fewer for the 9th grade participating in yoga than for all other grades not participating in yoga.

The number of cut classes was nearly 50% less for 9th graders participating in yoga than for the previous 9th grade cohort not participating in yoga. This suggests more time was spent in class, with greater opportunity for learning.

Referrals are a measure of how often students are disruptive to a degree requiring them to be referred to the Dean or Principal. Referrals for the 9th grade participating in yoga were lower than for the previous year’s 9th grade cohort not participating in yoga, over the same time period.

Description These programs take place in settings where yoga can be useful to mitigating the disastrous effects of trauma and stress; mental health clinics, homeless shelters, urban schools, detention centers. We train, mentor and dispatch a compassion corps of local yoga practitioners in outreach teams with staff from our partner organizations. Together, drawing on the expertise of the yogis and the staff, they design and implement trauma informed and sensitive on-site yoga programs.
Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Perceived Stress Scale
Perceptions of Yoga Survey 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

At our inpatient program with the Connecticut Mental Health Center we watched yoga help individuals shift from hyperarousal to relaxed in minutes. This can be profound for people who experience constant anxiety. And because yoga is nonverbal, it can help those people who experience the shutting down of their speech center after trauma.


Most of the clinicians at CMHC were completely new to yoga. The beauty of the power of yoga is in its simplicity; the simple act of moving can be empowering for numbed bodies. When we move our bodies in a purposeful way we are reclaiming our power, saying “I have a body and I am in control of this body.”


Importantly, yoga heals. It can rewire your brain stem, and change the fear system in your brain. It can regulate the balance between the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous systems and activate the cranial nerves so your body doesn’t respond to everything as if it is under attack.

Program Comments
CEO Comments

Stress is prevalent, in many forms. Social pressure, academic stress, trauma, poverty and violence are all norms of modern life. This is problematic because stress impacts the brain and its ability to maintain healthy relationships, receive new information and achieve a sense of well-being; in short it is a hindrance to living a peaceful and fulfilling life. Yoga reduces the impact of stress on the body and the brain. It increases activity in the parts of the brain that allow us to be creative, problem solve, self regulate and connect.

Most students in our poorest communities arrive at school with brains and bodies impacted by the stress of trauma, poverty and violent communities. While yoga doesn’t remove the stressors, it can help grow more resilient brains and bodies, able to combat the negative impact of stress, and give students a step up toward being healthy and ready for school.

But the benefits of yoga are not easily available to all. Barriers include cost, transportation, location, and even cultural sensitivity. 108 Monkeys tries to overcome these barriers by working with its volunteer teachers at a deep level on issues such as implicit bias, in order to make the physiological benefits of yoga and meditation accessible to all.

CEO/Executive Director
Dr. Peg Oliveira PhD
Term Start Jan 2012
Email peg@108monkeys.org
Experience Peg holds a PhD in Social and Developmental Psychology from Brandeis University. She is the Executive Director of the Gesell Institute of Child Development. She is a 500 E-RYT Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga Teacher, a Yoga Alliance Registered Education Provider, the lead in 108 Monkeys 200 Hour Yoga Alliance Registered Yoga School, and a Registered Children's Yoga Teacher with Yoga Alliance.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 309
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Quarterly
Collaborations
New Haven District Wellness Committee
Yoga Service Council 
New Haven Early Childhood Collaborative 
Board Chair
Dr. Peg Oliveira PhD
Company Affiliation Gesell Institute of Child Development
Term July 2017 to June 2020
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Nancy Close PhDYale Child Study Center
William Johnson T3EInitiative and New Haven Public Schools
Dr. Camille Brown Koff M.D.Yale Hospital
Alexandra McKnight
Damian Mendel United Adjusters
Peg Oliveira PhDGesell Institute of Child Development
Lauren Seder J.D.Seder Associates
Laura Sheinkopf
Joshua Sloat Cold Spring School
Shel Swanson Community Volunteer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 3
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Standing Committees
Volunteer
CEO Comments
We are actively searching for bookkeepers to donate their time!
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2017
Fiscal Year End June 30 2018
Projected Revenue $20,000.00
Projected Expenses $20,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Audit Documents
P&L FY172017
P&L FY162016
P&L FY152015
P&L FY142014
P&L FY132013
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Letter
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Trade Name Certificate2013View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$32,999$45,172--
Administration Expense$40,000$30,001--
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.971.23--
Program Expense/Total Expenses45%60%--
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%--
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$18,445$19,555--
Current Assets$18,280$19,272--
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$1,261----
Total Net Assets$17,184$19,555--
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --The 1440 Foundation $50,000--
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --United Way of Greater New Haven $10,000--
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- ----
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities14.50----
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%--
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments Currently, we are challenged by limited operational capacity / expertise. As a tiny organization, we are unable to purchase help in areas such as marketing or accounting. We seek assistance in these areas.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by The Community Foundation. Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation requires three years of financial information from the nonprofit organization; however, this requirement may not be available for some organizations due to their more recent incorporation or formation. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

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