Connecticut Food Bank
2 Research Parkway
Headquarters and Distribution Center
Wallingford CT 06492
Contact Information
Address 2 Research Parkway
Headquarters and Distribution Center
Wallingford, CT 06492-
Telephone (203) 469-5000 x
Fax 203-469-4871
E-mail cfb@ctfoodbank.org
Web and Social Media
Connecticut Food Bank staff help load food onto a partner agency's vehicle
Mission

The mission of Connecticut Food Bank is to provide nutritious food to people in need. We do this by supplying food products to our member agencies, as well as through direct food distribution programs and by promoting public awareness about the problem of hunger.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1982
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Beth Stokes
Board Chair Wesley Higgins
Board Chair Company Affiliation DiMaio Ahmad Capital (Retired)
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

The mission of Connecticut Food Bank is to provide nutritious food to people in need. We do this by supplying food products to our member agencies, as well as through direct food distribution programs and by promoting public awareness about the problem of hunger.

Background

Born from the concept of matching excess food supplies to individuals with limited resources, Connecticut Food Bank began distributing food in 1982 out of a 2,000 square foot warehouse in New Haven, supplying 400,000 pounds to 70 programs. Today, Connecticut Food Bank is the state's largest centralized provider of emergency hunger relief, distributing nearly 27 million pounds of food annually – enough to provide more than 22.5 million meals – to more than 600 programs across six of the state's eight counties: Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London and Windham. Connecticut Food Bank’s network of programs collectively serve an average of 144,000 food-insecure people of all ages every month. Member programs include food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, residential programs, senior and veteran centers, and day programs for low-income adults and children. Connecticut Food Bank’s direct outreach initiatives provide underserved populations with healthy food and nutrition education. These initiatives include the Mobile Pantry, Child Hunger Impact Program, and Commodity Supplemental Program (CSFP) for seniors.
 
As a member of Feeding America, Connecticut Food Bank secures food donations from a national and regional network of food donors, retail partners, manufacturers, wholesalers and farms. We acquire, store, and distribute food through a centralized distribution center in Wallingford and a regional warehouse located in Bridgeport. Food is also supplied to the Gemma E. Moran United Way/Labor Food Bank, an affiliate distribution organization in New London. Connecticut Food Bank transports food with a fleet of 17 vehicles, including three customized refrigerated mobile distribution trucks that bring food and services directly to residents of low-income neighborhoods. Connecticut Food Bank employs 65 staff members and has a pool of more than 5,000 volunteers. Food assistance is provided to people in need without regard to race, ethnic background, age, gender, sexual orientation, disability, and religious or political affiliation.

 
Impact

Last year Connecticut Food Bank distributed a record of nearly 27 million pounds of food – equivalent to more than 22.5 million meals – to benefit nearly 270,000 people in need across our six-county service area.

Our network of 300+ partner agencies received nearly 23 million pounds of nutritious food from Connecticut Food Bank at little to no cost for distribution to their clients.

Connecticut Food Bank distributed an additional four million pounds of food to people in need through the following direct service programs:

  • Mobile Pantry brought fresh produce and healthy perishable groceries directly to residents of low-income neighborhoods. Fresh produce, whole grains, high protein items, and dairy accounted for more than 70% of all food distributed by the program. Two Mobile Pantry trucks travelled to 55 sites and served an average of 6,400 food-insecure households (est. 16,400 people) each month.
  • The GROW Initiative provided fresh groceries and educational workshops for nearly 550 low-income families, serving a total of nearly 1,400 young children.
  • Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) supplied nearly 1,600 low-income seniors with monthly food kits.
  • Kids' BackPack Program distributed nearly 128,000 weekend food packets to more than 3,600 food-insecure schoolchildren.




Needs

Nearly half a million people across Connecticut -- 1 in 9 people, and 1 in 6 children -- struggle with hunger every month. Connecticut Food Bank and its network of member feeding programs serve populations that are at risk of hunger and according to the USDA, are food-insecure. The USDA uses the phrase “food insecurity” to describe a lack of consistent access to adequate amounts of food for an active healthy life.

Food-insecure populations include people unable to provide basic needs for their households because of economic and transportation barriers. The food we distribute helps households whose income is not sufficient to feed their families, seniors on fixed incomes and individuals who struggle economically to obtain the nutrition they need and to provide more consistency in meals, every day.

Connecticut Food Bank’s three major needs are:
  • Funds are needed from foundations, corporations and through individual donations to support procurement of food and grocery programs for distribution to our community partner food programs.
  • Food donations are needed from food manufacturers, distributors, retailers, wholesalers, and from local farmers.
  • Volunteers are needed to help us meet the need for food processing, volunteer engagement in office duties and at events. We encourage corporations and schools to volunteer at many levels, including basic tasks and skills based volunteering.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Food Banks, Food Pantries
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
Tertiary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Alliances & Advocacy
Areas Served
Other
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge

Programs
Description

Connecticut Food Bank is the state's largest centralized provider of emergency hunger relief, distributing 27 million pounds of food annually – enough to provide more than 22.5 million meals – across six of the state's eight counties: Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London, and Windham. Connecticut Food Bank is a member of Feeding America, the nation’s largest hunger-relief organization comprised of a network of 200 food banks. As a member of the Feeding America network, Connecticut Food Bank leverages national, regional and local partnerships to obtain bulk donations of nutritious food for nearly 270,000 residents at risk of hunger in our service area.

Connecticut Food Bank distributes food in two ways - through a network of partner member agencies who serve people in their community, and through direct to client service programs. Our network of partner member agencies includes food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, residential programs, senior and veteran centers, and day programs for low-income adults and children. Direct service programs - such as the Mobile Pantry - provide food-insecure people of all ages with healthy food and resources. Since its incorporation as the state’s first regional food bank more than 37 years ago, Connecticut Food Bank has distributed nearly 390 million pounds of food to thousands of residents at risk of hunger.

Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Connecticut Food Bank evaluates overall progress through the amount of nutritious food made available to low-income households in underserved communities by tracking pounds of food and fresh produce distributed, and the nutritional ranking of food items distributed through all programs. Connecticut Food Bank also evaluates success in  reducing food-insecurity by tracking the number of seniors, children and families and individual households served by our programs, and the number and frequency of direct service food distribution to sites in our service area. Program evaluation also considers feedback from partner agencies and clients who received food and services from Connecticut Food Bank and its partners.

Description
Connecticut Food Bank promotes Hunger Awareness by working with regional and national anti-hunger advocates and with local food policy councils in an ongoing effort to raise awareness about hunger in Connecticut.  We work to build partnerships with legislators, donors, member agencies, and communities through events and educational opportunities, including: Hunger Action Awareness Month, live and virtual food drives, and our Hunger 101 program. Hunger 101 gives people a taste of what food insecurity—or hunger—really is. Participants walk in someone else’s shoes and see firsthand what it’s like to struggle with poverty and food insecurity in Connecticut. Hunger 101 captures the daily stress of hunger as participants learn how to feed a family for a day with no or limited resources.


Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Connecticut Food Bank is working to build relationships with community partners and legislators through our Community Engagement Department and with the addition of the newly created position of Senior Director of Network and Distribution. Connecticut Food Bank will hold an open house at our new 84,000 sq.ft. facility in February.State legislators from the counties we serve and municipal CEO’s will be invited to attend, providing our leadership team and staff the opportunity to tour our facility and show new ways for us to work with community partners. Our Marketing and Communications Director is preparing a metrics dashboard that will be used to keep legislators updated on Connecticut Food Bank’s work to alleviate hunger in their communities. Connecticut Food Bank has also applied to have the Marketing and Communications Director attend advocacy training at Feeding America’s Advocacy Academy to give us the tools needed to build strategic advocacy in state and federal legislation.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

In the summer of 2015, Connecticut Food Bank welcomed a new Marketing and Communications Director and Chief Development Office. Thanks to these new development staff members, the organization is building a strategic plan for anti-hunger advocacy at the state and national level, including: building relationships with state legislators; supporting current anti-hunger initiatives at the legislative level; working in partnership with End Hunger CT! to track with some their advocacy initiatives; as well as participating in Feeding America advocacy opportunities at the national level.

Description The Mobile Pantry Program removes transportation barriers that make it difficult for food-insecure households to obtain fresh food and the nutrition they need. The Mobile Pantry truck brings fresh produce and healthy perishable groceries directly to low-income neighborhoods and areas with poor supermarket access and limited vehicle availability. The goal of the Mobile Pantry is to increase the amount of nutritious food – such as fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy items, and whole grains – made available to underserved communities that may otherwise have limited access to fresh, healthy food. Monthly Mobile Pantry distributions provide hungry households with a consistent supply of nutritious food items at no cost. As a result, food-insecure household members experience less hunger, improved nutrition and improved health outcomes.
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Connecticut Food Bank evaluates overall progress through the amount of nutritious food made available to low-income households in underserved communities by tracking pounds of food and fresh produce distributed, and the nutritional ranking of food items distributed through all programs. Connecticut Food Bank also evaluates success in reducing food-insecurity by tracking the number of seniors, children and families and individual households served by our programs, and the number and frequency of direct service food distribution to sites in our service area. Program evaluation also considers feedback from partner agencies and clients who received food and services from Connecticut Food Bank and its partners.
CEO/Executive Director
Beth Stokes
Term Start Feb 2020
Email bstokes@ctfoodbank.org
Experience


Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 61
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 5500
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 77%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 18
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 36
Hispanic/Latino 9
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 40
Female 25
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Bernard BeaudreauMay 2016 - June 2019
Valarie Shultz WilsonJuly 2019 - Feb 2020
Senior Staff
Title Chief Financial Officer
Title Chief Operating Officer
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
Board Chair
Wesley Higgins
Company Affiliation DiMaio Ahmad Capital (Retired)
Term Dec 2017 to Nov 2021
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Jenny ChouWiggin and Dana LLP
Kristen Cooksey Stowers PhDUCONN Rudd Center
Alan FeldmanOrthopedic Sports Medicine Center
Harry GarafaloGarafalo Markets LLC
Norman W. LaCroixDecision Analytics Group
Arlene PuttermanThe Stop & Shop Supermarket Company
Heather Smith-JaserDworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala P.C.
Wendy WahlAetna
Alfred D. WattsCornerstone Christian Center
Diana Zhang
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 6
Board Co-Chair
Wesley Higgins
Company Affiliation DiMaio Ahmad Capital
Term Nov 2015 to Oct 2017
Email wwhigmo@aol.com
Standing Committees
Executive
Board Governance
Finance
Personnel
Marketing
Program / Program Planning
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2019
Fiscal Year End June 30 2020
Projected Revenue $10,207,757.00
Projected Expenses $10,567,358.00
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201920182017
Total Revenue$49,767,946$45,197,663$50,878,645
Total Expenses$48,555,948$46,066,849$48,839,774
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201920182017
Total Assets----$27,117,966
Current Assets----$9,464,297
Long-Term Liabilities----$5,540,111
Current Liabilities----$972,262
Total Net Assets----$20,605,593
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201920182017
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 2 Research Parkway
Headquarters and Distribution Center
Wallingford, CT 06492
Primary Phone 203 469-5000
Contact Email cfb@ctfoodbank.org
CEO/Executive Director Beth Stokes
Board Chair Wesley Higgins
Board Chair Company Affiliation DiMaio Ahmad Capital (Retired)

 

Related Information

Meet Basic Needs

A strong community not only meets its members’ basic needs but also works to create long-term solutions to their problems. Provide people with affordable housing, enough to eat and access to affordable health care and you enable them to envision a better future for themselves.