Connecticut Food Bank
2 Research Parkway
Wallingford CT 06492
Contact Information
Address 2 Research Parkway
Wallingford, CT 06492-
Telephone (203) 469-5000 x
Fax 203-469-4871
E-mail cfb@ctfoodbank.org
Web and Social Media
Connecticut Food Bank's Mobile Pantry
Mission

The mission of Connecticut Food Bank is to provide nutritious food to people in need. We do this by supplying food products to our member agencies, as well as through direct food distribution programs and by promoting public awareness about the problem of hunger.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1982
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Bernard Beaudreau
Board Chair Alex Hutchinson
Board Chair Company Affiliation RPM Health
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $11,436,236.00
Projected Expenses $11,975,513.00
Statements
Mission

The mission of Connecticut Food Bank is to provide nutritious food to people in need. We do this by supplying food products to our member agencies, as well as through direct food distribution programs and by promoting public awareness about the problem of hunger.

Background
Connecticut Food Bank’s mission is to provide nutritious food to people in need.  Born from the concept of matching excess food supplies to individuals with limited resources, Connecticut Food Bank began distributing food in 1982 out of a 2,000 square foot warehouse in New Haven, supplying 400,000 pounds of food to 70 programs.  Today, Connecticut Food Bank is the state’s largest centralized provider of emergency hunger relief, distributing over 22 million pounds of food annually to benefit 300,000 residents at risk of hunger in six of the state’s eight counties: Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London, and Windham.  Connecticut Food Bank acquires, transports, warehouses, and distributes nutritious food to people in need through a network of 700 community-based partner programs that include food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, residential programs, and day programs for low-income adults and children.  Direct outreach programs, such as the Kids’ BackPack Program, the Mobile Pantry and the GROW! Up with Good Nutrition Initiative provide underserved populations with healthy food and nutrition education. 

 

Connecticut Food Bank distributes food through our new centralized distribution center in Wallingford and a regional warehouse located in Fairfield. Food is also supplied to the Gemma E. Moran United Way/Labor Food Center, an affiliate distribution organization in New London. Connecticut Food Bank transports food with a fleet of 15 vehicles, including two customized refrigerated mobile distribution trucks that bring food and services directly to residents of low-income neighborhoods. Connecticut Food Bank employs 60 staff members and has a pool of more than 4,000 volunteers.

 
Impact

In the past year, Connecticut Food Bank achieved exciting goals, including:

·        Connecticut Food Bank moved distribution operations in October 2015 from East Haven and Waterbury to its new 84,000 sq.ft. facility located in Wallingford. Our new warehouse is equipped with cool and cold storage areas for produce and frozen foods that meets or exceeds USDA food safety standards.  Our new facility has increased receiving and distribution capacity, with 12 loading docks that accommodate shipments from tractor trailers to loading bays for service members that often have small vehicles for pantry food pick-up. Our increased capacity for food storage and distribution enables us to provide more fresh produce to our community partner food programs.

·        In March 2015, we introduced our newly created Community Engagement Department to increase our capacity for marketing, community events, and hunger advocacy.  We added two new management level positions for community engagement and development, and a management position for our member services team, including: Director of Community Engagement Marketing; Director of Fund Development Operations; and a Senior Director of Network Capacity and Distribution Services.  This past summer, we also filled existing positions by welcoming a new Marketing and Communications Director and a Chief Development Officer.

·        During 2015, we were able to increase produce distribution and help community partners in Bridgeport procure a refrigerated truck, and 7 two-door refrigerator units for our partners in New Haven, Norwich, Waterbury, New London, and Bridgeport; increasing their capacity to safely store and distribute fresh foods to seniors, children, families and individuals at-risk of hunger.

 Connecticut Food Bank’s goals for the upcoming year include:

·        Increased distribution of fresh produce food to our community partners to reach food insecure households in Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New London, New Haven and Windham Counties. We are also working to increase our Farm-to-Pantry program to provide more locally grown produce in our service area. As the economy recovers from the Great Recession, many working families’ incomes are above the limits for supplemental nutrition assistance, leaving them with hard choices when it comes choosing to buying food or to meet other needs for their family, such as healthcare. Our increased produce and food distribution to our community partners will help us feed more households who are at-risk of hunger.

·        Our new community engagement team and Senior Director of Network Capacity and Distribution Services are working on ways to creatively engage and mobilize the communities we serve through hunger awareness events, including Hunger Awareness Action Month, and through advocacy surrounding food policy and legislative action.


Needs

Connecticut Food Bank addresses the need to provide nutritious food to seniors, children and families, and individuals who are at risk of hunger. In the six counties we serve, more than a half-million people struggle with food insecurity. Connecticut Food Bank provides more than 18.5 million meals annually, helping feed more than 300,000 people who struggle with hunger on a daily basis. We provide nourishing food to people of all ages from diverse ethnic, racial, religious and economic backgrounds. Through our 700 community partner food programs, Mobile Pantry, GROW! Up with Good Nutrition, and Kids’ Backpack program, we reach a wide audience and help eliminate transportation and economic barriers to accessing high-quality fresh produce, grains and dairy items; frozen chicken, fish, and meat products, and non-perishable grocery items.

Connecticut Food Bank’s three major needs are:

· Funds are needed from foundations, corporations and through individual donations to support procurement of food and grocery programs for distribution to our community partner food programs.

· Food donations are needed from food manufacturers, distributors, retailers, wholesalers, and from local farmers. 

· Volunteers are needed to help us meet the need for food processing, volunteer engagement in office duties and at events. We encourage corporations and schools to volunteer at many levels, including basic tasks and skills based volunteering.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Food Banks, Food Pantries
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
Tertiary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Alliances & Advocacy
Areas Served
Other
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge

Connecticut Food Bank distributes food through our direct service programs and partners including, Mobile Pantry, GROW, and Kids' BackPack in  Fairfield, Litchfield, Middlesex, New Haven, New London and Windham counties.  

Programs
Description
Connecticut Food Bank contracts with the State of Connecticut’s Department of Social Services to provide low-income households with food and nutrition assistance through The Emergency Food Assistance Program (TEFAP) - administered by the USDA, the Connecticut Nutrition Assistance Program (CTNAP), and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP). We are an affiliate of the national Feeding America network, an organization comprised of more than 200 food banks throughout the nation. Connecticut Food Bank works in partnership with national and state manufacturers, wholesalers, regional food industry associations, and local retailers and farmers. We have an affiliate distribution center in New London, a warehouse in Fairfield, and community programs comprised of food pantries, soup kitchens, emergency shelters, qualified residential programs, and day programs that serve low-income elderly and youth. The Connecticut Food Bank also provides direct service programs that promote hunger awareness and provide food to people in need.
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Connecticut Food Bank works to increase fresh produce distribution to our community partners and programs from our new 84,000 sq.ft. facility in Wallingford.  We are working with our partners to help them find new ways to build their capacity for fresh produce storage and distribution to reach people at-risk of hunger.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Connecticut Food Bank provides food for more than 300,000 at-risk seniors, children and families, and individuals through our 700 community partner food programs, Mobile Pantry, GROW, and Kids' BackPack. We measure success in using several evaluation tools including tracking food in pounds/meals and communities and people served; through successfully building a network of 700 community partner, and with food distributors, retailers, wholesalers and with local farmers to increase food distribution in our service area. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Connecticut Food Bank evaluates overall progress through the amount of nutritious food made available to low-income households in underserved communities by tracking pounds of food and fresh produce distributed, and the nutritional ranking of food items distributed through all programs. Connecticut Food Bank also evaluates success in  reducing food-insecurity by tracking the number of seniors, children and families and individual households served by our programs, and the number and frequency of direct service food distribution to sites in our service area. Program evaluation also considers feedback from partner agencies and clients who received food and services from Connecticut Food Bank and its partners.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

ANNETTE & TODD (Branford, CT)

Annette works full time as a medical office receptionist. Her husband was laid off from his construction job six months ago. Her earning combined with his unemployment benefits put them over the qualifying benefits for supplemental nutrition assistance from state programs. They began visiting the Branford Food Pantry, a partner of Connecticut Food Bank, to help feed their families.

DORIS (Southbury, CT)

Doris is in her 70s. She grew up in Brooklyn, and moved to Southbury five years ago, where her mom grew up. She worked as an administrative assistant for many years, before she left the workforce to care for her son, who was battling cancer. When her son passed away, Doris had depleted nearly all of her savings.  She relies on social security payments and relies on our Mobile Pantry program for fresh produce and foods she would otherwise not be able to afford.

DIANA (Plainfield, CT)

Diana describes herself as one of the working poor. She has a job with no benefits and no guaranteed work schedule. Diana’s husband Mike lost his job in 2014, and they no longer had health insurance. The Mobile Pantry program has helped them put meals and the table and still pay on the few medical bills they have.

Description

The Mobile Pantry Program removes barriers that make it difficult for food-insecure households to find transportation to retail grocers and pantries that could be miles from their home. Our refrigerated Mobile Pantry truck provides fresh produce, and nutritious dairy and whole grain products for food insecure people in the towns we serve. Each month, Connecticut Food Bank visits more than 31 distribution sites in our service area, distributing a wide variety of fresh food items reaching more than 4,500 households at-risk of hunger. A second mobile Pantry truck has been purchased through a State of Connecticut grant and will become operational in early 2017, with a goal of adding at least 8 new sites during the first year of operation. 

Population Served Families / Adults / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Mobile Pantry distributes more than one million pounds of nutritious fresh produce, bread and dairy products annually, helping to feed more than 4,500 food-insecure households each month. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The Mobile Pantry works collaboratively with local food-assistance programs to provide food to populations at-risk of hunger. Our Mobile Pantry provides fresh produce, dairy and grain items for food insecure seniors, families and individuals. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Connecticut Food Bank evaluates success of the Mobile Pantry program by tracking the number of meals and pounds of food distributed to the number of sites we serve. We also evaluate by tracking the number of households served, and through gathering feedback and input from surveys, helping us continually evaluate and improve this program.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Mobile Pantry client stories:

CYNTHIA - “It’s been a blessing.”

That’s how Cynthia describes the food assistance she and her family receive each month from our Mobile Pantry program. Cynthia recently had open-heart surgery and is unable to work. She said the Mobile Pantry her and her daughter and her grandchildren make it through some tough times. She offered this comment, “I’ve always loved vegetables and sometimes I don’t have enough money to buy them, When I come here, I always know I can get my fruits and vegetables.”

ERNEST - “The Mobile Pantry is a lifeline.”

Ernest, a Vietnam War veteran, said the Mobile Pantry is a lifeline. He is unable to work because of a service-related disability.  Ernest said that before regularly visiting the Mobile Pantry, he would rely on cans of soup and spaghetti to get by. He now enjoys the fresh foods he picks-up at the Mobile Pantry, and feels they help him stay healthy, “I’m able to get vegetables and potatoes, and today I received a variety of peppers and mushrooms. If it wasn’t for the Mobile Pantry, I would have less choices and not the variety of food to keep me healthy.”

Description

Our Kids' BackPack Program distributes healthy and child-friendly weekend food packets to schoolchildren who are at risk of hunger on weekends when low-cost or free National School Lunch Program (NSLP) meals are unavailable. This school year, the Kids’ BackPack Program will serve more than 3,324 food-insecure schoolchildren from 22  public school districts in our service area. When school is out-of-session from June – August, the Summer BackPack Program serves nearly 1,000 children, with 8 designated sites in Fairfield, Litchfield, and Middlesex counties.

Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Kids’ BackPack Program works closely with public school districts to identify children at-risk of hunger, from low-income households eligible for NSLP to provide supplemental weekend meals through food packets to help them stay nourished during the weekend. Food from the Kids’ BackPack Program helps children get the nutrition they need to thrive, at school, at home, and in life.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The Kids’ BackPack Program breaks the cycle of chronic hunger by providing supplemental weekend and summer nutrition for more than 3,324 low-income schoolchildren, who have been identified through their schools as being hungry during the day.  According to the Food Research and Action Center (FRAC), children from low-income households are often at-risk of hunger, leading to increased health related problems including illness and obesity. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Connecticut Food Bank tracks the number of children served, the pounds of food and meals distributed, and the number of weekend and summer distribution sites. We evaluate success of the Kids' BackPack program through easy-to-use. surveys completed by participating children, and through feedback and input from our school partners and parents. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Feedback from BackPack school partners:

“A first grader said that she was sad on Friday because it was a snow day and she did not have Friday club (which is when bags are passed out). She was happy on Monday because she was back at school and would get her snack bag. She stated that she really looked forward to it. The weekend snack program is the best part of Friday for her!”

“I have a student who is homeless. He visits his father every other weekend and they usually stay in a hotel with a microwave. He lives on the backpacker food on these weekends as there is no money for food. Prior to this, they might share one pizza over the weekend. Thanks for the program!”

“I don’t hear from the parents about the program but I can tell you that the kids love it. When I pass the kids in the hallway they will always ask, “Are we having backpack club this week?” They really like the food and some really get excited when they get the Cheerio bar. When the kids hear the announcement for the club they literally come running to get their bag. I had one student who told me that when he visited his family over the holiday season he brought his bag of food with him and when he returned to school he was asking when he would be getting the next bag.”

Description

The GROW! Up with Good Nutrition initiative is a family-centered program designed to provide nutritional foods for low-income families with young children. The GROW! truck is a customized, refrigerated vehicle with a mini-supermarket interior. Serving 31 distribution sites, the GROW! program is held at locations that offer early childhood services, preschool daycare, and Head Start programs. Parents and children participate in a brief nutrition and health education workshop before boarding the truck, where they are able to choose fresh foods and non-perishables, which might include items such as paper towels and diapers. In the fall of 2016, Connecticut Food Bank began distribution at 3 new sites for the GROW! program in Stamford, New Milford and Danbury.

Population Served Families / Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. GROW! visits sites in New Haven, Waterbury, Bridgeport, Wallingford, Middletown, and Derby, serving around 600 low-income families and 1,400 young children. The GROW truck makes twice monthly visits to each site twice a month over a six-month period. Each GROW distribution serves between 20 to 40 families with young children and provides each household with an average of 40 pounds of fresh produce, lean meats, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and other nutritious groceries. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The GROW! program provides pre-school children and parents with brief nutrition education classes and a visit to the refrigerated GROW! truck, where they can choose fresh produce, frozen proteins (meat, chicken, and fish), and dairy and grain products.  Long-term success of this program is measured by maintaining records of the number of families served, pounds of food/meals distributed, and of nutritional classes given.  We welcome feedback from families and from our community partners hosting the GROW! truck, to help us continually improve delivery of services and ensure that all the families we serve receive a wide variety of fresh nutritious food. Because of the GROW! program, families learn about good nutrition and are able to stretch their budgets while providing healthy food for their young children.
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Connecticut Food Bank evaluates the success of GROW! by tracking the pounds of food/meals distributed through the program, types of educational workshops, and number of children and parents served by the program and the number of sites served.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

 A mother lives with her six year old and the child’s grandmother – three generations under one roof – she says:

"The GROW workshops are very interesting. I learned a lot. My favorite tip is about bringing a grocery list so you can plan meals to pair with the food we get from the GROW truck. I never used a grocery list before –  I just 'winged it' , but now I plan everything out – what groceries I buy at Stop & Shop, Walgreens and the Dollar Store.  I choose groceries to make meals with the food that I get from the GROW truck. A grocery list is handy I have learned! Money is so tight, so I am glad to have it.The staples from the GROW truck are great – we use them all at home." 

 

 

A father attends an afternoon workshop with his two toddlers in tow; he shares:

"I am very happy with the GROW program. I have been to other food workshops before, but the GROW truck nutrition workshops have been even more useful and helpful for me –telling me practical things and nutritional things. . . My favorite workshop has been 'getting the best deal' since food is so expensive. . . things like using coupons, not shopping when you are hungry, buying big packages and breaking them down into smaller packages and looking for sales. Tips like that. Learning these things has been most helpful, and, the food is fantastic!  I use every bit of it."

 
 
A young mother at our new West Haven distribution site tells Connecticut Food Bank that the GROW program has:

". . . been a great help. Money is tight and I can give my family good, healthy food more often. I cut and freeze the vegetables and they last until the [GROW] truck comes again. Its fun for the children (ages 3 and 4 ½ years); they love to go on the‘grocery store truck’ as they call it and love to help me pick out the food. It has made them more aware of wanting to eat healthy. They are always asking ‘when are we going to go again?’ ”

Description
Connecticut Food Bank promotes Hunger Awareness by working with regional and national anti-hunger advocates and with local food policy councils in an ongoing effort to raise awareness about hunger in Connecticut.  We work to build partnerships with legislators, donors, member agencies, and communities through events and educational opportunities, including: Hunger Action Awareness Month, live and virtual food drives, and our Hunger 101 program. Hunger 101 gives people a taste of what food insecurity—or hunger—really is. Participants walk in someone else’s shoes and see firsthand what it’s like to struggle with poverty and food insecurity in Connecticut. Hunger 101 captures the daily stress of hunger as participants learn how to feed a family for a day with no or limited resources.


Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Connecticut Food Bank is working to build relationships with community partners and legislators through our Community Engagement Department and with the addition of the newly created position of Senior Director of Network and Distribution. Connecticut Food Bank will hold an open house at our new 84,000 sq.ft. facility in February.State legislators from the counties we serve and municipal CEO’s will be invited to attend, providing our leadership team and staff the opportunity to tour our facility and show new ways for us to work with community partners. Our Marketing and Communications Director is preparing a metrics dashboard that will be used to keep legislators updated on Connecticut Food Bank’s work to alleviate hunger in their communities. Connecticut Food Bank has also applied to have the Marketing and Communications Director attend advocacy training at Feeding America’s Advocacy Academy to give us the tools needed to build strategic advocacy in state and federal legislation.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

In the summer of 2015, Connecticut Food Bank welcomed a new Marketing and Communications Director and Chief Development Office. Thanks to these new development staff members, the organization is building a strategic plan for anti-hunger advocacy at the state and national level, including: building relationships with state legislators; supporting current anti-hunger initiatives at the legislative level; working in partnership with End Hunger CT! to track with some their advocacy initiatives; as well as participating in Feeding America advocacy opportunities at the national level.

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Bernard Beaudreau
Term Start May 2016
Email bbeaudreau@ctfoodbank.org
Experience

Bernard Beaudreau comes to the position with nearly 40 years of experience in human service work, including more than 20 years of leadership in food banking and hunger related service organizations at the state, national and international levels.

Most recently Beaudreau was Executive Director of Serve Rhode Island, connecting thousands of volunteers with hundreds of nonprofits and schools in the state. In addition to directing a volunteer center serving 14,000 Rhode Island volunteers, he administered a $2 million annual grant involving up to 300 AmeriCorps volunteers each year. He developed statewide volunteer recruitment campaigns and grew the organization’s Board of Directors from eight to 23 active members.

 

Prior to joining Serve Rhode Island, Beaudreau was Vice President of Development with The Global FoodBanking Network in Chicago, Illinois, which supports the development of food banks and national food bank networks in 14 countries. He developed grant proposals to major U.S. corporations, philanthropists and private foundations.

For 11 years, Beaudreau was Executive Director of the Rhode Island Community Food Bank, where he steadily grew the base of financial donors, increased donations by more than 600%, tripled food distribution and managed the relocation of the food bank to a state-of-the art facility. Beaudreau spearheaded initiatives to raise awareness of the issues of hunger and poverty and organized Rhode Island’s first-ever Childhood Poverty Summit.

Before leading the Rhode Island Community Food Bank, Beaudreau held three positions of increasing responsibility in resource development roles at Boston-based Oxfam America, the international relief and development agency. 

Beaudreau’s experience also includes resource and development roles in education and community development.

In making the announcement, Connecticut Food Bank Board Chair Alex Hutchinson said, “Bernie has a combination of experience and commitment to mission that will help the Connecticut Food Bank continue its leadership role in the fight against hunger.”

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 60
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 4000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 71%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 13
Asian American/Pacific Islander 3
Caucasian 34
Hispanic/Latino 8
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 3 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 28
Female 33
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Nancy L. Carrington Sept 1989 - Dec 2014
Rob Levine Jan 2015 - Oct 2015
Senior Staff
Title Chief Operating Officer
Title Chief Financial Officer
Title Chief Development Officer
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
Board Chair
Alex Hutchinson
Company Affiliation RPM Health
Term Nov 2015 to Oct 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Max Barry Aetna
Bernard Beaudreau Connecticut Food Bank
Carlton A. Byrd Commonfund
Jenny Chou Wiggin and Dana LLP
Wesley Higgins DiMaio Ahmad Capital
Jennifer King Masonicare Foundation
Norman W. LaCroix Decision Analytics Group
William C. Lesko CPADworken, Hillman, Lamorte & Sterczala, P.C.
Ed Marcantonio Hermenze & Marcantonio LLC
Rosemary O'Connell Sulzbach New Haven Museum
Arlene Putterman The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company
David Douglas Vipond Morrison Management Specialists
Evan Walker Walker Digital
Dianne Witte Yale University
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 10
Female 5
Board Co-Chair
Wesley Higgins
Company Affiliation DiMaio Ahmad Capital
Term Nov 2015 to Oct 2017
Email wwhigmo@aol.com
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $11,436,236.00
Projected Expenses $11,975,513.00
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Revenue$44,693,893$40,499,296$37,862,708
Total Expenses$41,850,126$39,948,723$36,264,643
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$39,340,449$37,730,586$34,988,675
Government Contributions$3,639,614$950,880$932,490
Federal------
State--$608,478$638,830
Local------
Unspecified$3,639,614$342,402$293,660
Individual Contributions------
------
$1,584,204$1,337,352$1,316,609
Investment Income, Net of Losses$163,524$184,239$124,214
Membership Dues$8,402$8,725$9,188
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other($42,300)$287,514$491,532
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$39,863,141$38,279,696$34,640,626
Administration Expense$977,156$897,466$858,389
Fundraising Expense$1,009,829$771,561$765,628
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.071.011.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses95%96%96%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue2%2%2%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$20,667,424$16,785,558$15,302,039
Current Assets$8,104,179$10,192,768$11,585,796
Long-Term Liabilities$1,879,156----
Current Liabilities$888,448$1,606,517$833,464
Total Net Assets$17,899,820$15,179,041$14,468,575
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountShopRite $424,993CT Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program $608,478CT Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program $638,830
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFeeding America $335,081ShopRite $501,552ShopRite $371,695
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountOur Family Foundation $250,000The Emergency Food Assistance Program $335,204 --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities9.126.3413.90
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets9%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Goal $18,789,000.00
Dates July 2013 to Jan 2018
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 2 Research Parkway
Wallingford, CT 06492
Primary Phone 203 469-5000
Contact Email cfb@ctfoodbank.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Bernard Beaudreau
Board Chair Alex Hutchinson
Board Chair Company Affiliation RPM Health

 

Related Information

Meet Basic Needs

A strong community not only meets its members’ basic needs but also works to create long-term solutions to their problems. Provide people with affordable housing, enough to eat and access to affordable health care and you enable them to envision a better future for themselves.