College Summit Connecticut
201 Orange Street
2nd Floor
New Haven CT 06510
Contact Information
Address 201 Orange Street
2nd Floor
New Haven, CT 06510-
Telephone (203) 776-0671 x
Fax 203-776-0658
E-mail vdelandro@collegesummit.org
Mission
College Summit transforms the lives of youth from low-income communities by connecting them to college and career success.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2008
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Veronica T. DeLandro
Board Chair Owen Ryan
Board Chair Company Affiliation Deloitte & Touche LLP
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission College Summit transforms the lives of youth from low-income communities by connecting them to college and career success.
Background

College Summit was founded nearly 20 years ago by Yale alum J.B. Schramm in Washington DC.  Working as a teen center director, Schramm saw how college transformed the lives of young people in the neighborhood, and how peer influence pushed some students off the college path while spurring other students to thrive. From a modest college immersion workshop program, College Summit has grown to serve more than 50,000 students in grades 9-12 annually in 180 partner high schools across 15 states and the District of Columbia by providing a comprehensive system for improving college-going and success rates.

 In Connecticut, programming launched in 2008 and College Summit has since served 19,000 students enrolled at partner high schools serving predominantly low-income populations and striving for greater access to higher education. In each school we have helped improve college enrollment rates by building school-wide college-going culture. Our program is especially successful for young people who are college-capable but lack the knowledge, role models, and support systems that could help them achieve their college aspirations. Each capable young person who is empowered not only to dream of college, but to achieve those dreams, becomes an agent of change in their school, family, and community.

Impact

Today, College Summit is the country's largest high school-wide college access provider, contracted to serve 50,000 students at 180 schools in 15 states. Consistently, CS schools achieve significant college enrollment rate (CER) boosts over baseline- 12 -18% on average.

Connecticut Regional Accomplishments

  • Since 2008, 19,000 low-income students have been provided with college access skills
  • 41 College Summit Peer Leaders became New Haven Promise Scholars from the class of 2014
  • 85% College enrollment rate of College Summit Peer Leaders
  • 78% College Summit students enroll in their 2nd year in college

College Summit Connecticut has worked with each of the New Haven high schools to provide resources, tools, and a curriculum that promote a college-going culture, and we have succeeded in our mission. Since taking root in Connecticut in 2008, we have served more than 16,000 students in New Haven. Of the 187 New Haven Scholarships awarded in 2014, 41 (22%) were awarded to College Summit Peer Leaders.

 
Needs
  • Recruit three additional members to join our regional advisory board.
  • Introductions to decision makers to foster new school partners outside of New Haven.
  • Corporate sponsors for summer workshops and events through the year, in addition to an increase in general operating funds.
  • More volunteers to support our students, events, and staff.
CEO Statement

College Summit's work centers around helping high schools create a culture where college is the expectation not the exception. We focus on low-income, minority, and oftentimes first generation college-goers.

For these students completing college is a complete game-changer. On average they will enjoy an extra $1 million in life-time earnings, and their children will likely attend college, thus breaking the multi-generational cycle of poverty. Two unique features of our program is empowering students to be their own agents of change as well as utilizing the positive peer pressure of peer-to-peer mentoring because we believe the most influential person to a 17-year old is another 17-year old. With the right guidance for our programming at College Summit, students will be well on their way to changing the lives of those around them, not just their own life.

We are the only organization with a comprehensive system for low-income high schools that:

- Trains and mobilizes student peer leaders to spark a school-wide interest in college-enrollment.
- Provides an in-school structure and curriculum for every senior to develop a post-secondary plan.
- Builds college-going culture by serving students starting in 9th grade and continuing through 12th grade.
- Delivers professional development and support for teachers and counselors.
- Adheres to rigorous performance-based metrics.
- Achieves consistent, verifiable results.
- Uses data to manage, evaluate, and continually improve programming to drive success.

Board Chair Statement

As a national organization with operations in 11 regions, College Summit has a rigorous process of selecting new sites based on ability to sustain programmatic operations via a combination of fee-for-service (FFS) and philanthropy. Since 2010, the Connecticut Region has achieved a solid financial base from FFS revenue and philanthropic support. As we enter our first year of partnership with Bulkeley High School in Hartford, we are leveraging the success we have achieved in other cities (New Haven) as an example of what multi-year partnerships can achieve.

In addition to the successful results of our school partners in New Haven, there have been structural changes that have helped strengthen the leadership and direction of this College Summit region. In April of 2013, Veronica DeLandro was appointed the Executive Director of the Connecticut Regional Office. During that same year Veronica formed the Connecticut Regional Advisory Board, charged with raising funds, offering strategic guidance, recruiting partners and allies, building the organization and board, and helping to raise the profile of the region. Board members include myself as Board Chair (Dean of Undergraduate Admissions at Yale University); Annie Abram, Psychoanalyst, Fairfield County; Kanicka Ingram-Mann, Director, Multicultural Recruitment, Quinnipiac University; Patricia Melton, Executive Director, New Haven Promise; Lori Charlton, Partner, Deloitte; Yamuna Menon, Director of Research and Policy, ConnCAN and John Papas, Senior Manager, Financial Accounting Foundation.

With leadership in place and an advisory board on hand, the Connecticut office is on its way to becoming one of the top performing College Summit regions.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Education / Educational Services
Areas Served
New Haven
Other
College Summit serves ~50,000 students in 11 regions in 14 States, partnering with about 185 Schools in 40 Districts.  Most students are served with our standard model and the others are served through a National Partnership Model.
 
In Connecticut, we serve nearly 6,000 high school students in grades 9 - 12 in New Haven and Hartford.
Programs
Description 9th-11th Grade "Launch" Curriculum: This grade-specific career and college planning curriculum helps students understand the relevance of high school to their current and future lives and envision high school as a launch pad to future success. The 5 CS core understandings include academic preparation, college-to-career connection, college familiarity, self-advocacy, and financial literacy.

Designed to address the development needs specific to each grade, topics to be covered will include: the relevance of high school and the importance of today; how and why to choose an academically rigorous course schedule; goal-setting and creating a Four-Year Plan; standardized tests (SAT and ACT); resumes; personal statements; financial aid; college vocabulary; and making college tangible via alumni interviews, college visits, etc.). To ensure all participants are engaged and on-track, leading performance indicators will be monitored throughout the school year, including the percentage of students who have:

• For Grade 9: created a CSNav account and filled in "The Basics" of "Your Portfolio;" completed a Learning Styles Inventory; saved a career to their Portfolio; completed a Plan of Study.
• For Grade 10: completed the SAT Test Prep; completed a draft of their Personal Statement; completed the Job Interview Practice; completed and saved a resume.
• For Grade 11: completed the SAT/ACT Test Prep; uploaded the Final Personal Statement; finished the Career Plan Builder; filled in the Expected Family Contribution; completed a Practice Application; saved at least one college to their Portfolio.
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Students in grades 9-11 (520 in 2011-12) explore and build competencies that will help them successfully navigate the college application process in their senior year.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Young people do not aspire to become high school dropouts. According to a nationwide survey by the National Association of Secondary School Principals, nine out of ten middle school students (92%) say it is likely they will attend college, but nearly seven of ten (68%) indicate they have little or no information about what they need to do in high school to prepare for college.

Research also suggests that an effective means of maximizing college enrollment is to reach students early in high school, and to help young people connect the dots between their academic work and their goals for the future-a Bridgespan Group study showed students who understand that link are six times more likely than their peers to go to college. College Summit has shown that keeping students on the college-ready path in 12th grade results in increased college enrollment rates. Expanding this model to earlier grades raises the expectations of all teachers that all their students graduate and go on to college.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. 9-11 grade student progress will be monitored based on the completion of various milestones which will be determined by each school and which vary by grade. Schools select from the following: percentage of students who: create a CSNav account; complete a learning styles inventory; save a career to their portfolio; complete a plan of study; complete a personal statement draft; do the job interview practice; create college lists; explore options for colleges and universities, complete and save a resume; upload the final personal statement; finish the career plan builder; review scholarship searches; save at least one college to their portfolio.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

The high schools within the New Haven Public school district implement the launch 9th – 11th grade curriculum within their advisory period. This allows for teachers to connect with a group of students outside of the realm of their subject matter. Through this connection faculty educate their students on post-secondary college and career planning.

Description Academically mid-tier students (15-20% of each school's rising senior class) attend one of our four-day summer workshops where they will learn to navigate the college and financial aid application processes and be trained to drive the development of college-going culture in their classrooms. [Peer-Leader trainees will be selected by teachers and counselors, with help from College Summit, based on the following criteria: low-income (as defined by Department of Education TRIO program guidelines), academically mid-tier (GPA 2.0 - 3.0 on 4.0 scale), and demonstrated leadership potential.) Summer workshops will feature enhanced leadership development sessions in public speaking and communication skills specifically aimed at preparing Peer Leaders to work with their teachers and to communicate effectively to their classmates.
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Rising seniors attend a four-day summer workshop where they become familiar with the college application process and are trained as "Peer Leaders" to inspire their classmates to aspire to college and help them through the steps to get there.

70-75% of all students who attend summer workshops will enroll in college by the fall after their high school graduation
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. College Summit works closely with schools to establish an objective college-going rate by: a) Establishing a baseline college enrollment rate (CER) by using data from three to five years prior to the College Summit partnership; b) Collecting data on student progress that serve as leading indicators of CER during the school year; c) Partnering with the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) to provide enrollment data.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. -12th grade student progress will be monitored through completion of the following milestones: senior-year plan, college list, personal statement, resume, college applications sent, taking the SATACT, and filing the FAFSA.
-Evaluations will be conducted after each student workshop and in the summer.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

College enrollment rates among our Peer Leaders (the students who attend a summer workshop) averages 80%.
The nearly 100 Peer Leader trainees who attended a 2014 summer workshop at Yale University agreed or strongly agreed that they had accomplished the goals of the workshop, as seen in the sample student evaluation responses below:

Evaluation Question: Agree/Strongly Agree

*Prepared to be a peer leader in high school: 100%
*Overall I think this workshop was good/excellent: 98%
* Rap Sessions promoted their unique skills and accomplishments: 98%
*Learned about colleges matching interests: 97%
* Alumni helped me understand college and deal with challenges: 94%

Description Throughout the school year, CS-trained teachers lead all seniors through this post-high school planning curriculum featuring goal setting, writing personal statements, planning for financial aid, completing well-matched college applications and the Free Application for Financial Student Aid (FAFSA) form.

We employ hands-on Web-based technology to drive the college application process, and to capture, analyze and use data to track progress toward attaining established school-specific college enrollment goals. Students and educators use CS's customized portal, "CSNav," to guide and track the post-secondary planning process.
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Seniors gain skills in organization, planning, and self-advocacy to help them graduate from high school and reach their post-secondary destination.

At least 75% of all participants will submit at least one college application and 75% of eligible participants will file the FAFSA form by the end of the school year.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Actionable data-We use data to manage, evaluate, and continually improve programming to consistently boost school-wide college enrollment rates by 12-18% over baseline, based on third-party data.

Tracking school progress along the college-ready path using leading performance indicators-completed college essays, college lists created, college applications submitted (highlighted in Student Milestones Reports). Staff meet with school administrators bi-monthly to discuss and analyze this data.

Tracking the college enrollment status of each student and his/her persistence. College enrollment data is obtained directly from registrars by working with the independent National Student Clearinghouse.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. 12th grade student progress will be monitored through completion of the following milestones: senior-year plan, college list, personal statement, resume, college applications sent, taking the SATACT, and filing the FAFSA.

College Summit works closely with schools to establish an objective college-going rate by: a) Establishing a baseline college enrollment rate (CER) by using data from three to five years prior to the College Summit partnership; b) Collecting data on student progress that serve as leading indicators of CER during the school year; c) Partnering with the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) to provide enrollment data
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

6,000+ New Haven low-income youth have received our tools and services, to date.

For the 2013-14 school year, 90% of 12th grade participants submitted at least one college application.

Description Prior to the beginning of the school year, all teachers and counselors responsible for implementing our school-year curriculum attend our Educator Academy, where they learn about creating dynamic classroom settings, collecting data, and tracking the application path of each student. Professional development also occurs throughout the school year, as needed.

We leverage the talents of teachers and principals via a structure that maximizes the contributions of each to build the capacity of school communities.
Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Throughout the 2014 -15 school year the College summit Connecticut region has trained nearly 600 teachers to be both college savvy and college-positive and equipped with curricula and state of the art tools to manage all of their students post-secondary planning to guide nearly 6,000 students during the 2014-15 school year. We project similar numbers during the 2015-16 school year.

Using our yearlong college advising curriculum and online technology we have increased the effectiveness of the 9th through 12th grade advisory periods helping to lead more students to apply to and attend college.   We will continue to support schools throughout the 2015-16 school year.

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Training and equipping teachers to manage their students' college application paths will reduce the burden on the high school counselor, enabling this position to devote more time to guidance.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Evaluations on curriculum implementation by teachers and counselors will be conducted in the fall and spring of each school year to assess programmatic successes and challenges. Evaluations will be also conducted after each student workshop and teacher training in the summer.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

“Having College Summit within our school provides students the opportunity to begin their post-secondary plan earlier rather than later.”

“The experience that I had at the College Summit Educator Training was one that afforded me the opportunity to understand resources provided to our school that will allow me to assist my students in their post-secondary education and career planning journey”

CEO/Executive Director
Mrs. Veronica T. DeLandro
Term Start Jan 2010
Email vdelandro@collegesummit.org
Experience

Born and raised in the Midwest, Veronica moved to Connecticut fifteen years ago to begin her career with ESPN. After working at ESPN for six years, her passion for helping students go to college led her to a career in the nonprofit arena. Veronica currently serves as the Executive Director for College Summit.  As Executive Director, Veronica is responsible for the growth, sustainability, fundraising initiatives and program implementation for the Connecticut Region. 

Aside from work, Veronica is very active in her community.  She currently serves as the President of the Hartford Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. and scholarship chair for the CT River Valley Hampton Alumni Chapter.  She is long-time supporter and board member for the Hartford Area Habitat for Humanity Affiliate and the John E. Rogers African American Cultural Center in Hartford, CT.  In 2007 Veronica was appointed by the former Governor M. Jodi Rell to represent Connecticut at the African American Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C.  In 2011 Veronica was selected to be a fellow in leadership development roundtable program at Fairfield University and in 2012 Veronica was selected by Connecticut Magazine as a “40 under 40” honoree. 

Veronica earned her Bachelor’s degree with honors in Mass Media Arts with a concentration in Broadcast Journalism from Hampton University in Hampton, VA, and her Master’s in Public Administration with a concentration in Nonprofit Management from the University of Connecticut. 

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 75%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Bi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Bi-Annually
Collaborations

Nearly 6,000 high school students in 13 New Haven high schools engage in post-secondary planning. School Partners for SY 2014 -15 in Connecticut:

  • Cooperative Arts & Humanities High School
  • Engineering & Science University Magnet School
  • Hill Regional Career High School
  • High School in the Community Academy for Law & Social Justice
  • Hyde School of Health Sciences & Sports Medicine
  • James Hillhouse High School
  • Metropolitan Business Academy
  • New Haven Academy
  • New Horizons
  • New Light
  • Riverside Academy
  • The Sound School
  • Wilbur Cross High School

College Partners:

  • Albertus Magnus College
  • Central Connecticut State University
  • Gateway Community College
  • Southern CT State University
  • Quinnipiac University
  • University of Connecticut
  • Yale University

Community Partners

  • New Haven Promise
  • New Haven Public School District
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
U.S. Social Entrepreneur of the YearWorld Economic Forum2008
Received the highest award in the field of college accessNational Association for College Admission Counseling2011
The First Decade AwardThe Harvard Divinity School2000
Named one of the top 20 social capitalists in the United StatesFast Company magazine and Monitor Group2003
Named of of the top 20 social capitalists in the United StatesFast Company and Monitor Group2005
Recognized along with Deloitte as the nation’s top corporate-nonprofit partnershipU.S. Chamber of Commerce2010
Board Chair
Owen Ryan
Company Affiliation Deloitte & Touche LLP
Term Jan 2015 to Jan 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Emmanuel Fortune Deloitte Consulting
Keith Frome King Center Charter School
Dean Furbush ScrollMotion
Chuck Harris The Edna McConnell Clark Foundation
Jamie Harrison Podesta Group
Roch Hillenbrand Stony Brook Investments, LLC
Vanessa Kirsch New Profit Inc.
Julie Mork ECA Foundation
Steve Sacks Burberry Group plc
Barry Salzberg Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited
Art Samberg Hawkes Financial, LLC
Laura Samberg The Samberg Family Foundation
J.B. Schramm Chair, Earn to Learn Initiative, New Profit, Inc
Fannie Tseng Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 4
Standing Committees
Board Governance
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Nominating
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Dr. Annie Abram PhD, LCSW, Psychoanalyst
Lori Charlton Deloitte
Kanicka Ingram-Mann Quinnipiac University
Patricia Melton New Haven Promise
Yamuna Menon ConnCAN
John Pappas Financial Accounting Standards Board
Jeremiah Quinlan Yale University
CEO Comments
Connecticut has a regional advisory board.  
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start May 01 2014
Fiscal Year End Apr 30 2015
Projected Revenue $1,067,451.00
Projected Expenses $1,102,691.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Revenue$16,491,548$13,494,614$13,868,049
Total Expenses$14,286,758$16,478,144$17,041,597
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$9,930,956$6,751,990$7,990,798
Government Contributions$1,405,612$1,220,411$1,314,376
Federal$1,367,332$1,220,411$1,314,376
State$22,029----
Local------
Unspecified$16,251----
Individual Contributions$445,374$678,042$798,948
------
$4,314,177$4,852,239$3,138,034
Investment Income, Net of Losses--$126$336
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind$372,576$7,419$509,040
Other$22,853($15,613)$116,517
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$11,914,651$10,637,244$10,986,355
Administration Expense$1,034,022$3,890,225$3,412,732
Fundraising Expense$1,338,085$1,950,675$2,642,510
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.150.820.81
Program Expense/Total Expenses83%65%64%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue11%23%26%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$9,866,252$9,975,819$14,134,440
Current Assets$5,931,432$5,780,920$9,477,753
Long-Term Liabilities$750,000$1,721,826$1,781,741
Current Liabilities$1,017,738$1,148,082$1,577,797
Total Net Assets$8,098,514$7,105,911$10,774,902
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDeloitte Services $1,867,000Darden Restaurants $700,000CNCS $850,184
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountSocial Innovation Fund $1,733,370New Profit Inc. $420,790Citi Foundation $780,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountWalmart $800,000Samberg Family Foundation $505,000SeaChange $758,021
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities5.835.046.01
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets8%17%13%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments By the end of FY2013, the College Summit Board and management recognized significant changes were required and began a restructuring and cost-reduction program.  In FY2014, College Summit showed a positive change in net assets, stronger cash position and continuing decrease in cost per students served.  Looking forward to FY15, new donors, new programs and pilots, new executive leadership and strong support from veteran funders who understand the value in the College Summit mission and the students it serves are contributing toward another year of a projected positive change to net assets.  
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 201 Orange Street
2nd Floor
New Haven, CT 06510
Primary Phone 203 776-0671
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Veronica T. DeLandro
Board Chair Owen Ryan
Board Chair Company Affiliation Deloitte & Touche LLP

 

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