EMERGE Connecticut
830 Grand Ave
New Haven CT 06511-4922
Contact Information
Address 830 Grand Ave
New Haven, CT 06511-4922
Telephone (203) 562-0171 x
Fax 203-562-0171
E-mail info@emergect.net
Web and Social Media
Community Fund Picture

Mission

EMERGE Connecticut, Inc. is a self-sufficient Social Enterprise that operates a Transitional Employment Program for recently released ex-offenders in the Greater New Haven area. Our goal is to provide our participants with the opportunity to end the pattern of recidivism. EMERGE crewmembers are offered paid, part-time training in construction, landscaping and property management while at the same time engaging in an array of unpaid program components designed to promote behavioral change. This combination of on-the-job training and program services has proven successful with New Haven’s re-entry population since July of 2011 by helping our participants return to their families as responsible members, and their communities as law-abiding, contributing citizens.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2012
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dan Jusino
Board Chair Althea Marshall Brooks
Board Chair Company Affiliation New Haven Board of Eduction
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $635,000.00
Projected Expenses $684,644.00
Statements
Mission

EMERGE Connecticut, Inc. is a self-sufficient Social Enterprise that operates a Transitional Employment Program for recently released ex-offenders in the Greater New Haven area. Our goal is to provide our participants with the opportunity to end the pattern of recidivism. EMERGE crewmembers are offered paid, part-time training in construction, landscaping and property management while at the same time engaging in an array of unpaid program components designed to promote behavioral change. This combination of on-the-job training and program services has proven successful with New Haven’s re-entry population since July of 2011 by helping our participants return to their families as responsible members, and their communities as law-abiding, contributing citizens.

Background

In July of 2011, EMERGE Connecticut, Inc., began a 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation that operates as a social enterprise committed to helping formerly incarcerated persons make a successful return to their families as responsible members, and to their communities as law-abiding, contributing citizens. EMERGE uses the methods, strategies and disciplines of business, and the power and opportunities of the marketplace to advance its social impact. What makes EMERGE unique among local nonprofits is the significant levels of self-generated income from business activities that are used to fund the organization’s operations. Our “Earn and Learn” model provides each participant with the experience of learning marketable work skills, appropriate employment behaviors, and improving their basic educational skills within a workplace environment, while earning an income within the framework of a transitional work component that can last as long as six (6) months. 

EMERGE has implemented an innovative, trauma-responsive model that uses paid work experience to recruit and engage former offenders returning to New Haven, Connecticut. Our six-month program begins with cohorts of 15-18 participants attending a one-week, 35 hour job readiness (“mental toughness”) course. Our job readiness curriculum is based on a cognitive behavioral (CBT) approach that offers ex-offenders the insights and skills needed to "code-switch" from the world of crime to that of work, and helps them begin the process of self-exploration, goal-setting, and better decision-making. Participants are then placed in work crews operated by EMERGE, who is the employer of record, where they learn construction and property management skills over a 6 month period while renovating blighted properties into new affordable housing throughout the city. Other employment services include coaching for life skills and career planning, basic education classes, job readiness “soft skills” training, legal services related to child support and driver’s license recovery, job search and placement assistance, and post-placement retention services.

Through positive and supportive relationship building, our multi-phase, wrap-around service delivery approach breaks the cycle of destructive behavior by working with our program members to effectively deal with their trauma by starting a process of self-exploration intended to change their life trajectory. Our approach to personal wellness includes referrals to mental health services that help participants recognize the presence of trauma symptoms and acknowledge the role trauma has played – and continues to play – in their lives. EMERGE emphasizes behavior change, and teaching the skills needed to self-manage that change, so the individual breaks the tendency to react without taking account of consequences of their actions.

EMERGE’s priorities are clear: to rebuild the capacity of the individual to earn a living wage, and for a parent to earn a family-supporting wage – or at a minimum contribute to family-supporting income – so they can begin to pick up the pieces and rebuild their lives. Our comprehensive approach has proven successful in keeping members employed beyond their participation in EMERGE, and produced a two year recidivism rate of 16%, which is 40 points lower than the State of Connecticut Department of Correction.

 
Impact

In the 2015 – 2016 fiscal year, EMERGE experienced the following program-level results:

- EMERGE had a 16% two-year recidivism rate (based on 2013 cohorts).

- EMERGE served 56 participants, enrolling 48 new crewmembers, meaning 48 transitional jobs created.

- Thanks to our volunteer tutors from First Presbyterian Church, 100% of EMERGE crewmembers engaged in traceable CASAS testing improved their math and reading scores by at least 1 grade level.

-60% of EMERGE alumni moved immediately to outside work or education upon exit.

- EMERGE generates 58% of its operating budget from commercial activity, which pays the wages of our work crew members, who worked 12,067 total hours.

Community-level impact: improved public safety, increasing affordable housing, and community service

- Improving Public Safety: EMERGE improves public safety in two ways: reduced crime, and a reduction in blighted properties, which are magnets for illicit activity such as drug dealing, squatting, and arson. It is significant to note that not one EMERGE participant has ever been arrested while participating in our program!

- Increasing the Stock of Affordable Housing: In 2014 and 2015, EMERGE has prepared 26 multi-family houses, which include 56 housing units that have been converted from blighted housing into newly occupied owner-occupied homes.

- Community Service: EMERGE work crews have contributed 1,334 hours of community service in Fiscal Year 2015-2016. Community service is a stepping stone towards atonement for the participant; giving back to a community where they caused harm, by visibly reshaping neighborhoods through projects such as community clean ups, tree planting, and moving furniture for the formerly homeless who are moving into permanent housing.

Needs

1. While EMERGE continues to be successful in acquiring work that generates crew-related revenues, our ongoing challenge is raising support dollars for program-related services.  We have an immediate need for a full time "Life Coach", valued at $45,000 annually, to provide the following services for crewmembers:


- Facilitating Parenting Groups
- Individual career counseling
- Family reunification
- Assisting with personal development needs
- Advocating on crewmembers' behalf for supportive services

Volunteers who are capable and willing to provide any of the above services would also be welcomed.

2. On the business, revenue-generating side, the EMERGE crewmembers would benefit from a utility pickup vehicle to transport crewmembers and tools to worksites.

3. There is an ongoing need for mental health professionals that would support our trauma-based approach to workforce development. Our experience has been that many crewmembers arrive with unresolved childhood traumas that continue to play a major role in their inability to find and keep a job.

4. EMERGE would also benefit from an individual with a background in construction to train and supervise a crew of 6 on job sites.

5. Another challenge that EMERGE routinely faces is instability in housing. Returning offenders often settle for unhealthy living situations upon release as they build back good will with family members and establish themselves financially. EMERGE crewmembers would benefit from housing opportunities that are beneficial to their personal development.

CEO Statement

EMERGE Connecticut's strategic approach begins with its organizational structure as a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation that operates as a social enterprise. As a social enterprise, there are three characteristics that distinguish EMERGE from other types of businesses, nonprofits or government agencies:

1. EMERGE operates with a "double bottom line" that places equal emphasis on services and revenue to sustain and expand services to clients.


2. EMERGE employs program participants on work crews where they earn an income and learn marketable skills.

3. EMERGE's commercial activity is both a distinctive feature and strong revenue driver that accounts for high levels of earned income in our operating budget (58%) that makes us unique among nonprofits.

At the program level, EMERGE's strategic approach implements a research-driven model that uses the best evidence to design a workforce program that addresses the most prevalent employment barriers for hard-to-employ individuals -particularly the formerly incarcerated. The EMERGE model uses transitional (time limited) employment to engage participants in a structured model with wrap-around services that include:

- Extended transitional employment for up to 6 months of immediate paid work once they are home

- Mandatory literacy and numeracy classes to address very low basic educational skill levels

- Public benefits screening (food stamps, health insurance, etc.) to stabilize the individual with food and shelter when they are released

- Daily job readiness training in real workplace situations, with daily written evaluations to assess workplace skills like teamwork, punctuality, following direction, taking initiative.

- Weekly anger management sessions facilitated by two program participants to allow participants to discuss issues in an open and honest environment.

- A trauma-informed approach to personal wellness that includes referrals to mental health services.

- Weekly fatherhood and parenting classes that follow evidence-based curriculums and promote healthy relationships.​

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Employment / Job Training
Secondary Organization Category Crime & Legal - Related / Rehabilitation Services for Offenders
Tertiary Organization Category Education / Remedial Reading & Encouragement
Areas Served
New Haven
Ansonia
Derby
East Haven
Hamden
North Haven
Orange
West Haven
EMERGE CT primarily serves the Greater New Haven community, but services have reached as far as Waterbury and Harford for offenders returning to the New Haven area.
Programs
Description

EMERGE’s Community Offender Re-Entry Experience (C.O.R.E.) is our transitional employment component and it is our flagship program that makes EMERGE unique among Connecticut nonprofits. Upon successful compliance with the employment intervention process, participants are eligible to work up to six months, where they earn between $10 to $12 per hour, based on experience and performance. As the “enhanced” model is designed, participants are eligible to work up to 24 hours a week in a work crew environment and apply their existing and newly acquired skill sets under the supervision of a crew chief. The remaining 16 hours are allotted for other mandatory activities such as literacy classes, support and anger management groups, job search, meeting with EMERGE staff, and complying with conditions of state supervision such as court appearances and parole officer appointments. 


Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders / At-Risk Populations /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. 100% of eligible CORE participants are screened for and receive new benefits.  CORE participants are required to undergo random and scheduled chemical screenings throughout their involvement to ensure that 100% remain drug-free.  60% are able to open a banking account with earned income.  100% of enrollees are baseline tested on the CASAS scale, and those who test under a 12th grade level are required to participate in our in-house classroom training.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. CORE averages a 73% placement rate over the past two years with a 62% retention rate at 62%.  The average placement salary is $11.75/HR.
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. EMERGE has been fortunate enough to have been engaged in United Way of Greater New Haven's Partnership for Economic Opportunity, who required us to report quarterly shared performance measures under the Results Based Accountability framework. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. CORE's ability to provide a salary to crewmembers while they are engaged in mandatory program services is a strong motivating factor in impacting the behavioral change that has led to a 12 % recidivism rate to date.
Description Low literacy is a common employment barrier among formerly incarcerated persons. According to the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), 19% of former offenders are functionally illiterate, and another 40% have low basic literacy levels. This single barrier makes these persons unemployable over the long term because in essence they are not trainable and have difficulty following written instructions. EMERGE’s literacy approach uses an “open entry, open exit” model, and is supplemented by Khan Academy, an on-line curriculum resource. The “open entry, open exit” approach meets the program participant at whatever literacy and numeracy level they are at when they enroll in EMERGE, and uses computer-based curricula and tools, supplemented by classroom tutors to assist them as needed.  At EMERGE, the mandatory literacy component requires participants to address this barrier regardless of having a high school diploma or not.
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Since January 2013, 80% of crewmembers engaged in a minimum of 40 classroom training hours have seen an increase of one (1) or more grade levels on the CASAS scale or tested out at a 245 (12th grade) goal in Math and Reading.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

EMERGE has found that the primary value added through literacy classroom training is the ability for crewmembers to access and receive content courses at community colleges rather than utilizing any grant supports to pay for remedial courses.  A second benefit is the opportunity for crewmembers access "off-the-shelf" certification courses through the Department of Labor that previously had been unavailable to them.

A less measurable, but arguably more valuable benefit to meeting the Literacy and Numeracy goals is the sense of confidence and self-efficacy that is gained through completing a challenge.  Crewmembers who improve their scores are able to use critical thinking and basic math skills on our constructions sites and at future jobs, confidently taking on more skilled work and adding value to the project.  At home, something as simple as assisting their children with homework assignments becomes less of a challenge, and the prospect of returning to school becomes less intimidating.
 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Upon enrollment, all EMERGE crewmembers are baseline tested on the CASAS scale, and are given individual service strategies designed to help improve their scores upon re-test.  Baseline and re-test scores are documented weekly, along with the number of hours of classroom training, and reported on a quarterly basis.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. EMERGE has seen 80% of our crewmembers increase their scores at least one grade level for every 40 hours of classroom training.  EMERGE's ability to offer crewmembers more paid work hours weekly upon "testing out" of Literacy and Numeracy at a 245 CASAS score has been a great source of motivation, providing an incentive to study and use their classroom time productively.
Description Real Talk is EMERGE’s weekly peer-to-peer group meeting. Real Talk provides a forum for work crew members to openly discuss issues or concerns they face day to day throughout their re-entry that require support and guidance. Each week a different crewmember selects a topic that is of particular importance to them, and they are asked to facilitate the discussion on that topic.  Each individual crewmember is then given an opportunity to offer real-life examples of how they may or may not relate to the topic.  A sample of recent Real Talk topics include: “Being a Better Father”; “Dealing with loss of a loved one”; “Better Decision Making”; and “Leading a 'Double Life'”.  Group discussions help build a network of understanding and respect between each cohort of crewmembers and start a dialogue on personal issues that members can later address individually. Real Talk has been successful in fostering positive behavioral changes and reducing recidivism rates.
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders / Males /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

In the short term, Real Talk has been a way of monitoring the changes in the overall outlook and progress in behavioral change for each individual client.  Real Talk has also helped from a Case Management standpoint to identify what type of discussions, support, referrals and advocacy may be necessary on a case-by-case basis.


Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Real Talk is EMERGE’s weekly peer-to-peer group meeting. Real Talk provides a forum for work crew members to openly discuss issues or concerns they face day to day throughout their re-entry that require support and guidance. Each week a different crewmember selects a topic that is of particular importance to them, and they are asked to facilitate the discussion on that topic.  Each individual crewmember is then given an opportunity to offer real-life examples of how they may or may not relate to the topic.  A sample of recent Real Talk topics include: “Being a Better Father”; “Dealing with loss of a loved one”; “Better Decision Making”; and “Leading a 'Double Life'”.  Group discussions help build a network of understanding and respect between each cohort of crewmembers and start a dialogue on personal issues that members can later address individually. Real Talk has been successful in fostering positive behavioral changes and reducing recidivism rates.

Description

Through a partnership with the Fair Haven Community Health Center, which is a member of the statewide Nurturing Families Network, EMERGE supports parents and children in New Haven with the goal of preventing child maltreatment by strengthening families through reunification, fatherhood outreach and group support. The aim of the parenting classes is to prevent future unplanned pregnancies and to get young dads involved in healthy relationships with their children, even if relations with the mother have soured. Many young dads become estranged from their children because they are no longer enamored of the mother.  Many struggle with developing a connection with their children after returning from years of incarceration and are separated from their children when they were very young and find that they must re-introduce themselves into their lives.  Parenting groups help clients work their way through these and other parenting challenges through a variety of parenting curriculums.

Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders / Families /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Parenting also helps staff to better case manage EMERGE crewmembers on a weekly basis as it raises pressing issues for each individual crewmember. These conversations make for more constructive case management “1-on-1” conversations as crewmembers re-connect severed family ties, key relationships and other family reunification concerns that are pivotal to the support system needed to be successful in the re-entry process. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Not unlike Real Talk, Parenting serves as a gateway to outside mental health services including family counseling, relationship counseling, and addiction services. Parenting, in collaboration with Real Talk and Literacy create a well-rounded foundation to the personal development outcomes that have proven to end the cycle of recidivism. Assisting these parents who are over 90% male helps to make better fathers in our community, fewer single-parent households, fewer at-risk children and safer households.

Description

With the help of the Connecticut Women’s Consortium, EMERGE staff has been trained to facilitate a 6-week trauma-informed men’s group called "Exploring Trauma: A Brief Intervention for Men". The group focuses on exploring the unresolved childhood traumas that play into behavior and attitudes as adults. Traumatic stress and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) are high among many who have been incarcerated, and this group raises awareness and offers strategies to navigate the feelings and behaviors associated with many of these issues.

Population Served / /
CEO/Executive Director
Dan Jusino
Term Start Apr 2011
Email dan@emergect.net
Co-CEO
Mark Wilson
Term Start Jan 2011
Email mark@emergect.net
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 6
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 9
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 92%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 5
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 1
Unspecified 1
Senior Staff
Title Director of Program Services
Experience/Biography I was born and raised in Willimantic CT where I graduated from Windham High School in 2008. I was accepted to the Anthropology Program at Southern Connecticut State University. I graduated from SCSU in 2012 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Cultural Anthropology.

Throughout my high school and college years I traveled on my own to five foreign countries on three separate trips volunteering and taking college courses. I have also done volunteer work in the state of Connecticut with political campaigns and elections, as well as programs affiliated with my church in Willimantic, CT. In my travels I’ve worked largely in the Hospitality and Food Service Industries, as well as in audio/video technology at my University.

I started at EMERGE CT, Inc. in January of 2013 as the Case Manager/Life Coach for this incredible organization. Through my time here I have taken on several aspects of the program operations, including Literacy and Numeracy classroom facilitator and CASAS testing proctor, COS-Parenting instructor, and Employability Workshop facilitator.   I was promoted to Director of Program Services as in June 2014.

After working under Dan Jusino at EMERGE CT, Inc. for a period of 21 months, I have learned a great deal about the importance of transitional jobs for the re-entry population, and have had the personal pleasure of seeing our crewmembers’ successes come to fruition. I whole-heartedly believe in the mission and future of EMERGE CT, Inc. and am committed to the betterment of my community.
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Bi-Annually
Board Chair
Althea Marshall Brooks
Company Affiliation New Haven Board of Eduction
Term July 2015 to June 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Howard K. Hill Howard K. Hill Funeral Services
Chris Nicotra Olympia Properties
Noel G. Petra Petra Construction
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 3
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Board Co-Chair
Howard K. Hill
Company Affiliation Howard K. Hill Funeral Services
Term July 2015 to June 2017
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $635,000.00
Projected Expenses $684,644.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902015
Form 9902014
Form 9902013
Form 9902012
Audit Documents
EMERGE P&L2015
EMERGE P&L2014
EMERGE P&L2013
EMERGE P&L2012
IRS Letter of Exemption
EMERGE IRS Determination Ltr
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$2,880----
Government Contributions$209,423$215,784$193,851
Federal------
State------
Local$209,423----
Unspecified--$215,784$193,851
Individual Contributions------
$212,545----
--$166,080$63,765
Investment Income, Net of Losses----$5
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$380,295$294,750$265,335
Administration Expense$89,552$101,407$97,759
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.900.960.71
Program Expense/Total Expenses81%74%73%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$48,930$76,736$89,045
Current Assets$31,554$58,420$80,044
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$34,371$15,697$13,328
Total Net Assets$14,559$61,039$75,717
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountAnnie E Casey Foundation $100,000The Annie E. Casey Foundaiton $100,000The Annie E Casey Foundation $100,575
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountUnited Way of CT $40,522The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $50,000United Way of Connecticut $90,432
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $40,000United Way of CT $48,059Human Resources Agency of New Britain, Inc. $8,844
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.923.726.01
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
The difference of $49,644 between projected income and expenses is made up by assets carried over from the previous fiscal year. 
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by The Community Foundation.  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation requires three years of financial information from the nonprofit organization; however, this requirement may not be available for some organizations due to their more recent incorporation or formation. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 830 Grand Ave
New Haven, CT 065114922
Primary Phone 203 562-0171
Contact Email info@emergect.net
CEO/Executive Director Dan Jusino
Board Chair Althea Marshall Brooks
Board Chair Company Affiliation New Haven Board of Eduction

 

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