New Haven Early Childhood Council
School Readiness Office, 3rd floor
54 Meadow Street
New Haven CT 06519
Contact Information
Address School Readiness Office, 3rd floor
54 Meadow Street
New Haven, CT 06519-
Telephone (203) 946-7875 x
Fax 203-946-2297
E-mail info@nhecc.org
Web and Social Media
Web Site http://nhecc.org
Mission
All New Haven children, birth through 8, are healthy, safe, thriving in nurturing families and prepared to be successful lifelong learners.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1997
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Randi Renee McCray
Board Chair Jayne Gary
Board Chair Company Affiliation Department of Social Services
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $158,000.00
Projected Expenses $158,000.00
Statements
Mission All New Haven children, birth through 8, are healthy, safe, thriving in nurturing families and prepared to be successful lifelong learners.
Background

The New Haven Early Childhood Council (NHECC) was created in 1997 under state statute to increase local community involvement in decisions about early care and education.  In 2002, the Council expanded its focus to include ensuring that all children from birth to age eight have the opportunities, supports, and experiences they need to reach their full potential.

The Mayor and School Superintendent appoint the Council’s members, who include parents, representatives from community organizations invested in the well-being of young children, and the Mayor and Superintendent or their designees.  The Council’s monthly meetings are open to the public. 

In 2008 the NHECC became a Discovery Community, one of 41 in CT. Discovery is a public-private partnership among the State of Connecticut and its Office of Early Childhood, the Children’s Fund of Connecticut, and the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund.
 
The NHECC's work is to IDENTIFY the community’s needs for affordable, high-quality early childhood programs and services for young children and their families; EDUCATE the community and local and state policy makers on early childhood issues and concerns, INFORM families about available services, supports, and events; CONVENE community stakeholders where needed; OVERSEE the distribution of state School Readiness funds; and partner with the New Haven Public Schools; and ADVOCATE at the state and local level for resources.
 
In 2007 the Council began the development of its Plan with the support of the Mayor. A task force was formed to encourage community input. Task force meetings involved more than 130 participants including parents, educators, health care providers and representatives of family support, government, and non-profit organizations. 
 
In 2013 the NHECC began a process to revise its Plan and to work on looking at how programs and systems are conceptualized and coordinated, and leading changes that will have a long-term positive impact on young children and families. 
 
In 2014 the NHECC developed a more specific strategic plan for the coming two years. Work on these more refined and specific strategies is underway. 
Impact

The Council's (NHECC) top accomplishments this past year include our work with New Haven Public Schools (NHPS) to increase alignment between Pre-K and early elementary grades; improvements in quality in early care and education settings; and increased outreach and support for families of young children.   

The Pre-K to Grade 3 Committee, a partnership of NHECC and NHPS, launched a pilot project this past year in 12 NHPS Pre-K and Kindergarten classrooms to integrate play-based, developmentally appropriate learning into early grade classrooms.  
 
The NHECC also continued efforts to improve quality of early care and education settings, including offering coaching to improve teachers' literacy and math skills, connecting classrooms to mental health consultation services, and providing books and other resources to enrich classroom environments.   
 
The Council increased its outreach and support for families of young children by developing and distributing a new brochure (in English and Spanish) for parents of children entering Kindergarten called “Families Are Their Child’s First Teachers"; by offering weekly literacy workshops for parents whose children attend bilingual programs (receiving books and props for their home libraries); and the design and distribution of the "Kids Kit," a tool designed to assist parents to register for Kindergarten and other programs.  Almost 2500 kits were distributed to families in the city.
 
Our goals for the current year include expansion of the Pre-K to Grade 3 pilot to include more classrooms at the Pre-K and kindergarten levels; increasing supports for parents, particularly of infants and toddlers; and streamlining the enrollment process for families into preschool/Pre-K.   
Needs
Our top five most pressing needs are:
1.  Securing ongoing funding in light of shrinking state budgets.  The Council's work requires funding for administrative support to coordinate the work of the NHECC and its committees, including the collection of data and reporting of outcomes. The Council also needs funding to carry out the strategies in its plan.  
 
2.  Creating more opportunities for young children to access quality early care and education.  Currently, 28% of incoming kindergarten students do not have a preschool experience, and there are only enough licensed early care and education spaces for 1 out of every 11 infants and toddlers in New Haven.   
 
3.   Parents of children aged 0 to 8 need to have the knowledge and skills to support their children's development. Parents also need access to to services and supports to ensure their children's emotional and mental health.
 
4. Continuing to improve the quality of early care and education so that children have enriching, relationship-based environments that prepare them for success in school.  
 
5.  Creating a more seamless early childhood system is needed so that all parents can be knowledgeable about the services and supports that exist in the community and how to access them. 
 
CEO Statement
The Council is the collaborative entity working on early childhood issues in New Haven. The Council has provided leadership around the development and implementation of strategic plans to improve outcomes for young children and their families in New Haven since the development of its first strategic plan in 2002. As part of our 2009 planning process, the Council developed a "desired result" or vision statement that has guided our work since, and is used to bring together parents, community members, early care and education providers, health professionals, home visitors, parent educators, and others to find common ground and explore opportunities to work together. The Council is committed to creating an inclusive process that involves a wide range of stakeholders and reflects community voice.
The system for early childhood is fragmented in many ways as a result of funding policies and practices at the federal, state, and local levels. While there are a number of resources in New Haven for young children and their families, access to them is not always easy for families, especially those that need these resources the most. The NHECC is focused on creating a coordinated, seamless system, informed by and meeting the needs of families, so that we achieve better outcomes for our youngest residents.  
  
Board Chair Statement Both our strength and our challenge is that we are a collaborative entity, dependent on the involvement and resources of a wide range of partners to accomplish our ambitious agenda.  The Council works to "knit together" a wide range of organizations and community perspectives into a common agenda and purpose.  The pace of change is sometimes slower than I would like, given the significant need that exists, but building relationships with different partners and bringing people along to do new and different work takes persistence and tenacity.  I believe in this work because I believe that young children and their families are our future.  I am also committed to the work of the Council because I believe that no one organization working alone can tackle the challenges we face; it requires that we work together, as a community, to truly make a difference.   
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Education / Preschools
Secondary Organization Category Education / Primary & Elementary Schools
Tertiary Organization Category Education / Parent & Teacher Groups
Areas Served
New Haven
The New Haven Early Childhood Council serves young children and their families throughout all neighborhoods in the city of New Haven.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments In addition to the 29 members of the New Haven Early Childhood Council there are another 30 or so individuals that work with the Council as committed partners.  These individuals participate at monthly Council meetings and on working committees. These 30 people include members of the New Haven Public School administration and staff, administrators of early childhood provider organizations, the staff of the nonprofit organization that serves young children and their families, as well as community members that share the NHECC commitment to our vision.
Programs
Description
This program is overseen by the Pre-K-Grade 3 Committee, a partnership of NHECC and New Haven Public Schools.  The Committee's Action Plan for 2014-2015 is focused on two areas.  
 
The first is a Pilot Project using a training/coaching model with New Haven Public School PreK and Kindergarten teachers in 12 classrooms in 6 schools, to use strategies that are designed to increase the executive function skills of their students.  An increase in children's executive function skills improves their working memory, their ability to stay focused and their cognitive flexibility, promoting higher order thinking, and literacy and math skills.  
 
The second area of focus is improving the transition experience of children entering Kindergarten and their families.  A spring orientation for families will take place before the end of the current school year.  In addition, for the first time, the fall orientation will include individual meetings with Kindergarten teachers and the child as well as the parents.  
 
 
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / K-12 (5-19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
The short term achievement is the same as the long term except that it takes place in only 12 classrooms, and the project began after the school year began. 
 
The short term achievement of the changes in the Kindergarten transition is the same as the long term.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The pilot program will be expanded and embedded into the New Haven Public School System, ideally, over time it will be used in all Pre-K and K classrooms.  Children will increase their executive function skills, and have much improved literacy and math skills.
 
Utilizing the strategies that are being taught to teachers in the pilot program will change the culture of the Pre-K and Kindergarten classrooms and encourage more developmentally appropriate education practices and environments for the children.
 
Ultimately the achievement gap that we see in New Haven will diminish and no longer exist.  
 
The orientation for children entering Kindergarten will allow teachers to assess each child individually and personally. Knowing each child allows the teacher to be better prepared to teach the children in the classroom.  Meeting with each parent  provides the opportunity to build relationships with parents and encourage their participation and engagement in the child's education.
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Consultants that are providing the training and mentoring to the teachers will be creating a data collection system that will look at the fidelity to the model they are teaching, as well as the outcomes for the children.
 
The success of the changes to the transition of children into Kindergarten can be tracked by parent surveys as well as teacher surveys. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. A Pre-K teacher participating in the executive function pilot this year indicated that at first, she was overwhelmed by the thought of implementing the new teaching strategies she was learning.  She worried about how to put it into action, and whether the children in her classroom would respond well to the changes.  After just a few months, however, she is thrilled with the impact in her classroom.  Children are handling transitions much more smoothly, are engaged in the activities, and are happily accomplishing learning tasks, such as writing, that they previously avoided.   
Description
The Dual Language Pilot Project is in its third year. Sixty 3 and 4 year olds at LULAC Head Start are taught using a bilingual teaching model in which teachers and children speak Spanish on two days, English on two days, and either language on the fifth day. Teachers receive training in language acquisition as well as coaching and mentoring in the classroom, with a focus on creating literacy rich environments and making the most of all teachable moments.
 
There is also a Family Workshop component to this program.  Each Friday, for a total of 26 weeks, families attend a short workshop during which they receive a book, a related prop and a bookmark with a suggested lesson for the book.  Families learn to use the book effectively with their children.   As a result of these workshops families are reading to their children more often and are learning to become their child's teacher.
 
This year the pilot project is also providing 11 family workshops at Columbus Academy, a New Haven Public School.   
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / Families /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Children will have higher scores on literacy assessments when they leave the preschool program.  
 
The family workshop aspect of the program is evaluated by conducting surveys with the families.  Survey questions are designed to determine if the workshops are having a positive impact on how often and how much parents are reading to their children. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The Dual Language Pilot Project (DLLP) was developed to improve the literacy skills of the children that attend the LULAC Headstart Program.  The literacy scores of the participating children (that continue their education in the New Haven Public Schools) are being tracked on a long term basis to assess the impact as they move on to Kindergarten and the later grades.   
 
While the DLLP has two aspects that impact children, the bilingual teaching model and the weekly family literacy workshops, the long term impact assessment will not discriminate.
 
The teachers that participate in the DLLP are being assessed and evaluated on how they implement the bilingual model and the quality of the environment in their classrooms.  It is the intention of LULAC Headstart to continue this model of teaching after the DLLP has ended.  They will be evaluating its progress going forward, but the New Haven Public School system will continue to follow the students that attended LULAC.
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The success of the program, as noted above, is being monitored by the consultants (the bilingual education coach and the literacy coach providing the family workshops).  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Families report anecdotally, as well as via survey that they are spending an increased amount of time reading to their children at home, and working on lessons that involve literacy.  They are very appreciative of the books that they receive for their home libraries.  The children are also very excited about this as well, and encourage their parents to read to them.
Description
Pre-K Enrollment is an identified early childhood system issue in New Haven.  A quality Pre-K experience is important to prepare children for Kindergarten; approximately 30% of the children that enroll in Kindergarten have not had a Pre-K experience.  
 
The process to enroll in Pre-K, in particular, in a free or subsidized space is not straightforward.  A committee that includes representatives from the NHPS was formed this year to make recommendations for a process that improves access.
 
A data collection and analysis project has recently been completed. We now know the  reasons why parents do not enroll their children in Pre-K, in total, and by neighborhood. The project included mapping the capacity and needs by neighborhood.
 
Knowing where children that don't attend Pre-K live as well as having the demographic information will aid in effective outreach to these families.  It will also aid in the decision making process about where free and subsidized Pre-K programs needs to be offered.
 
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / Families /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our short-term success will be clearer information available for parents about how to enroll in preschool, and a common application form and process among providers.  
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The long-term success of this effort will be more children attending preschool as a result of an easier-to-navigate enrollment system, and expanded availability as a result of better data about parent need.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Parent surveys whether or not their children attend preschool and, if they did not attend, the reasons why.  This information is collected as part of the kindergarten registration and orientation process.  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. We are now working directly with the school registration office to understand and shape the registration process.  
Description

The Week of the Young Child (WOYC) is a signature program of the NHECC. Activities include family-friendly literacy-focused events in the community at public venues that include museums, libraries and the local farmer's market. Other events take place at NHECC member or partner organizations. All activities stress the importance of literacy, reading and talking with young children and raise community awareness of the New Haven Early Childhood Council.

 
The Little Read is an integral part of the WOYC. Books are distributed to the families that attend these events as well as at Early Childhood Centers and Family Care Homes that choose to participate in the WOYC. 
 

In addition,  the WOYC celebrates the important work that Early Childhood Educators do every day and to provide Professional Development. Curriculum Boxes that contain books for the classroom and related props for the children to use are distributed to both centers and family child care homes. 

Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / K-12 (5-19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The short term success of the Week of the Young Child is measured, as above, in the numbers of community partners that sponsor events, the number of member organizations, early childcare centers and family child care homes that hold events and the numbers of families that attend the community events.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The Week of the Young Child (WOYC) raises the awareness of the importance of  literacy, and provides opportunities for parents to participate in learning opportunities for using books with their children.  It also puts quality children's pictures books into family homes.  Tracking the success of this program beyond the numbers of events and books that are provided is difficult because there are so many other factors to consider with public data that addresses children's literacy skills.
 
 The WOYC is also a program that brings community awareness about the New Haven Early Childhood Council and its work.  Awareness brings more partners to our work as well as the awareness of the importance of the earliest years in a child's life.  A method of measuring this has not been determined.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. New Haven Early Childhood Council members attend the public events that are held in the community.  They observe the participation of the children and the families.  We track the number of families who participate each year.  The early childcare centers and family child cares that hold events during the WOYC provide photos of the children and families enjoying their events with their families.  Last year one Pre-K program created a play and invited the parents to come and see it.  Children, families and child care providers report successful events.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Between 2011 and 2014, family attendance at Week of the Young Child community events has increased from 861 to 1,207.  
Description

WORDS and Numbers began as an Infant and Toddler Language & Literacy Initiative, funded by United Way of Greater New Haven's Success by 6 Grant program.  WORDS was designed to  promote language development for infants & toddlers by increasing the oral language of their caregivers and the number of books each child hears. WORDS has a three-prong approach to developing strong language skills in young children: 1) providing a skilled literacy coach to instruct teachers about how young children acquire language; 2) using quality children's books and props to expand vocabulary; and 3) creating family lending libraries to promote reading at home.  

 
In 2013-2014 the Numbers aspect was added to the program.  It focuses on teaching numeracy concepts using the same techniques as WORDS, to center-based teachers and family child care home caregivers.
 

The project's in-depth approach to building language and numeracy-rich classrooms and strengthen teaching strategies in selected center-based and family childcare classrooms that serve infants and toddlers is designed to improve and change practice. 

 
Coaches model reading books, talking, listening and the critical integration of language and numeracy. The project includes observation to monitor progress of teacher implementation of new skills.
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The consultants that provide the teaching and mentoring also observe the providers to ensure a understanding and to encourage the change in practice. They report that they see a high degree of change. The program participants also report their own change of practice.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The intention of this project is to provide provide instruction, mentoring, and materials for early childcare center classrooms and family child care programs to improve the teaching practices of providers.  Our theory is that improved teaching practices will ensure a higher quality experience for the children, and improve their readiness for kindergarten.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. As noted above, the consultants observe the providers and prepare written reports.  The providers that participate also provide written reports of the changes they have incorporated in their work with the children in their classrooms and family child cares.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. As an example, a provider reported that she was incorporating numeracy concepts into her daily routine in her family child care home by cutting snack foods into halves and quarters while talking to the children about this. Another example is a provider that made it a priority to converse in her program during that day about numeracy concepts such as bigger and smaller, taller and shorter.
Program Comments
CEO Comments
The New Haven Early Childhood Council's work is not easily described by the five entries in this section for Programs.  The Council itself guides its work, and while the Dual Language Pilot Program, Week of the Young Child and Words & Numbers are true programs, the work of the Committee is targeted towards systemic issues for children and families.  
 
The Council is striving towards work that is impactful for larger numbers of people than are typically touched by programs.  In addition, the role of Council member includes participating in advocacy on early childhood issues at the city level, but also at the state level.  The Council works in and with the community to engage parents and other stakeholders in its mission.
 
The Council has committees in addition to the two noted as Programs above.  Other active committees and a brief description of their work is below.
 
Quality Committee:  In addition to planning and executing the Week of the Young Child, this group provides input into the use of the Quality Enhancement funds that are part of New Haven's School Readiness Grant, and develops strategies to ensure that early childhood programs are high quality.  Their intent is for all early childhood programs to provide an experience that is relationship-based and trauma informed to best support the emotional health of the children.  
 
Infants and Toddlers Committee: Their work is to ensure that families and caregivers have the knowledge and the resources to support their children's development from the day they are born.
 
Grants and Resource Development Committee:  In addition to identifying potential sources of financial resources, this committee oversees the School Readiness Grant that provides 1073 subsidized Pre-K spaces. 
CEO/Executive Director
Randi Renee McCray
Term Start May 2016
Email rmccray@uwgnh.org
Experience Randi is a professional with a diverse background in management, nonprofit, and higher education.  She comes to the Council as a previous leader of multiple diversity initiatives at Yale University and a background in policy and research.  Her skills have supported the Council on multiple levels.  With significant ties to the New Haven community, she is able to build significant relationships and gather resources to help move the Council agenda forward.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation N/A
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
 Community Foundation of Greater New Haven
  • meeting space 
LULAC
  •   meeting space 
New Haven Public Schools
  • printing and distributing materials and brochures
  • meeting and event space
 Teach for America
  • meeting space 
United Way of Greater New Haven
  •    meeting space 
  •    bookkeeping and accounting services
  •    copying 
 
Comments
CEO Comments
Due to series of legislative changes that have the potential to impact the availability of early care and education in New Haven, the Council needs to revisit its strategic plan and re-align its priorities to measurable outcomes that can address the current needs of families in the community.  During the upcoming program year, the Council will need to perform an assessment and modify its plan to be responsive to the current early childhood landscape.
Board Chair
Jayne Gary
Company Affiliation Department of Social Services
Term Jan 2016 to Aug 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Janet Alfano The Diaper Bank
Gladys Deutsch Leila Day Nursery/ New Haven Assn. for the Education of Young Children
Sarah Fabish Community Foundation of Greater New Haven
Xia Feng New Haven Free Public Library
Evelyn Flamm Fair Haven Community Health Center
Jeffie Frazier Retired
Jayne Gary CT Department of Social Services
Theodora Glover Retired
Marcy Guddemi Gesell Institute
Kathy Hagearty New Haven Health Department/Nurturing Family Network
Eliza Halsey Parent
Kim Harris Harris and Tucker School
Cathy Lenihan Office of Early Childhood/Children's Trust Fund
Kia Levey MOMS Partnership
Kirsten Levinsohn New Haven Reads
Susan Logston Gateway Community College
Sandra Malmquist Creating Kids/CT Children's Museum
Dr. Tina Mannarinio New Haven Public Schools
Christine Montgomery Clifford Beers
Michele Moore New Haven Public Schools
Robin Moore-Evans Student Parenting and Family Services, Celatto Childcare Center
Dr. Martha Okafor City of New Haven
Magdalena Rosales-Alban LULAC
Barbara Stern ACES - Early Childhood Department
Elisabeth Teller SARAH Inc.
Cordelia Thorpe Ward 22, New Haven
Sandra Trevino Junta for Progressive Action
Dr. Robert Windom Cornell Scott Hill Health Center
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 16
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 27
Unspecified 1
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Operations
CEO Comments
The NHECC is a community collaborative.  As such, it has not formed its non-profit but rather works in partnership with a broad range of community organizations, including government, to accomplish its mission. Our structure benefits from strong partnerships, but it also creates challenges in that everyone who serves on the Council has multiple responsibilities and, at times, competing priorities that make reaching consensus and taking action a slower process.  
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2017
Fiscal Year End June 30 2018
Projected Revenue $158,000.00
Projected Expenses $158,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$140,683$130,268$84,701
Government Contributions$185,583$165,583$165,583
Federal------
State$108,583$108,583$108,583
Local$77,000$57,000$57,000
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions------
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses------
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$217,363$198,452$73,999
Administration Expense$77,230$66,499$164,290
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.111.121.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses74%75%31%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$31,673$30,900$11,995
Current Assets------
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets------
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDiscovery $112,683 -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountUnited Way of Greater New Haven $28,000 -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

The New Haven Early Childhood Council operates under the 501c3 of the United Way of Greater New Haven. The 990s and audits contained in this profile are those for the United Way of Greater New Haven. The previous three years of financial information in the profile is specific to the New Haven Early Childhood Council.

 
This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address School Readiness Office, 3rd floor
54 Meadow Street
New Haven, CT 06519
Primary Phone 203 946-7875
Contact Email info@nhecc.org
CEO/Executive Director Randi Renee McCray
Board Chair Jayne Gary
Board Chair Company Affiliation Department of Social Services

 

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