Connecticut Center for Patient Safety
857 Post Road
#220
Fairfield CT 06824
Contact Information
Address 857 Post Road
#220
Fairfield, CT 06824-
Telephone (203) 610-0610 x
Fax 203-256-0033
E-mail info@ctcps.org
Web and Social Media

Mission

Premised on the fundamental principle that quality health care is a right, the Connecticut Center for Patient Safety works in our communities, within our healthcare systems, and with policy makers to promote patient safety, improve the quality of health care and to protect the rights of all patients through education, accountability, and advocacy. 

A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.
The Connecticut Center for Patient Safety (CTCPS) is involved in research on the provision of health care and dental services to the special needs population including those with developmental and intellectual disabilities - many of whom are unable to speak for themselves.  We seek to identify the support services individuals and their caregivers currently have available, the challenges that are faced in accessing healthcare by this population group, and the gaps between the two.  By identifying the gaps, educational solutions to empower those with developmental and intellectual disabilities and those who provide services to this population will also be identified. This information will be used as the foundation for a follow-up project to develop an educational curriculum for these patients, their caregivers and for clinical providers to empower and inform them and to improve their access to appropriate health care services.
A Great Opportunity Ending Date June 30 2017
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2004
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Lisa Freeman
Board Chair Donal Alan Manning
Board Chair Company Affiliation Planetree
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

Premised on the fundamental principle that quality health care is a right, the Connecticut Center for Patient Safety works in our communities, within our healthcare systems, and with policy makers to promote patient safety, improve the quality of health care and to protect the rights of all patients through education, accountability, and advocacy. 

Background

On 10/4/04, the nonprofit, Connecticut Center for Patient Safety, was incorporated. On 4/26/05 CTCPS was granted 501(c)(3) nonprofit status.

The founders had experienced the impact of medical harm. With a vision grounded in their belief that consumers have the right to receive safe, high quality health care they organized a voice to address the needs and expectations of individuals in an evolving complex health care system. 

Early efforts focused on raising awareness of patient safety issues with policy makers. Using stories to educate was new.  100,000 deaths/year from infection has new meaning when the audience understands the impact of a mother who died or a father out of work- both from preventable harm. We now regularly speak to nursing students and others in CT.

We serve in many ways. We sit at state and national committees assuring that the public, non-conflicted patient voice is represented.

In addition, we offer:

  • presentations to nursing and medical schools, hospitals and community groups
  • panel, committee and conference participation on healthcare policy and practice
  • media commentary
  • 1-on-1 support

Much of our outreach addresses the needs of underserved and vulnerable populations in our towns. 

We are on Facebook (since 2009), Twitter (since 2013), maintain a robust website, and publish a newsletter (since 2009). 

In 2014, we released our research: Removing Barriers - Creating Health Care Access for Connecticut's Newly Insured finding our residents do not have the needed level of health literacy to understand complex health insurance plans or how to access care. We delivered it to state policy makers and organizations so that they would be able to incorporate our findings into upcoming policy decisions. We offered solutions to overcome the barriers including expanded educational outreach to all stakeholders believing it will result in better community and individual health, higher patient satisfaction and significant cost savings.

Today we have an active and passionate Board. We have broad based funding sources and we remain non-conflicted and truly representative of the consumer voice in all our activities.

It is now well accepted that there are up to 440,000 deaths each year in the United States due to medical error. We focus on raising an awareness of patient safety issues among our policy makers, our residents and members of the health care community through programs including education, workshops, conferences and our website.

Impact

The Connecticut Center for Patient Safety fulfills our mission by providing outreach and education to health professionals, students and the public in the areas of patient engagement and patient safety. Healthcare is rapidly changing and patients must become empowered and more engaged.

We represented and participated as a patient voice on panels, committees, local, regional and national organizations.  We worked with and built relationships with and between all stakeholders.  We put a face on the patient experience and we share patient narratives. 

We offered educational workshops and classroom experiences to nursing, medical students, health science students and medical residents, the healthcare leaders of tomorrow, to bring the patient experience and patient safety strategies to them through the perspective of the patient. 

We worked to improve patient outcomes. We produced data, information and analysis pertaining to the extent, type and sources of medical error and patient harm in Connecticut. Last year we researched and published Removing Barriers: Creating Health Care Access for Connecticut's Newly Insured.

Through our public education, we raised awareness and provided factual information to the public and members.  We educate patients and consumers of healthcare on patient engagement and strategies of an informed consumer.  We maintain our website, publish a monthly newsletter and engage on social media.

We intend to continue advancing and expanding our work. We will work to form new and more partnerships to improve patient outcomes. We will expand our educational offerings and locations of workshops. We will continue to gather and analyze data and use it to bring about change in the delivery of healthcare. We will continue to engage the public through social media, presentations and direct patient education and support, so that health care consumers will be more informed, more knowledgeable and more confident engaging in their own health care. 

Needs

We are a non-conflicted, patient-centric patient advocacy organization. To meet ongoing and rapid changes in healthcare our needs are not limited to, but include:

Financial Support: CTCPS relies on donations and grants to support our work. We recently received over $40,000 following a matching challenge donation drive to support our educational programs offered to tomorrow’s healthcare leaders. We also have additional on-going need to support our other programs. We need financial support.

Strategic planning: Because healthcare is changing so rapidly, we believe that we will benefit by undertaking a review and renewed design of the strategic plan for our organization. $5000 for facilitation and development.

Volunteers: To provide the services that we do with a limited budget, we rely on and always need volunteers to work on program development, educational services and community engagement.

Website: With the rapid changes in technology and platforms, we would benefit from a re-designed website bringing us up to current standards and real-time integration with social media. $10,000 for analytics, design and build.

Staff: Health care is vast. The patient voice is needed in all silos of health care. To expand our impact, we would benefit by being able to add additional staff.

CEO Statement

The Connecticut Center for Patient Safety represents our state’s population as one of the only non-conflicted patients’ voice at local, state and national organizations that advance health care policy and practice, to roundtables seeking solutions to the problems with delivery of health care and at conferences addressing these issues as well.  Many of these conversations address the needs of the underserved and vulnerable populations in Connecticut.  We support transparency in healthcare and systems that are person-centered promoting a culture of safe health care delivery. It is when this culture of safety is fully understood and supported at all levels of healthcare that we believe medical harm will be significantly reduced, outcomes will be improved and costs will be contained. 

We have a website that provides resources for all of the citizens of Connecticut.  There are links, which educate and guide consumers on navigating the health care system, hospital care, senior services, information about health concerns, and legislative issues.

We belong to and actively participate in a number of like-minded organizations where we are able to exchange ideas and innovations to support the provision of patient- and family-centered care. Our organization also provides speakers at conferences and to large and small groups on a variety of related topics. We facilitate conversations and the skill of conversations between interdisciplinary teams and thus work to improve communication, one of the leading causes of medical errors, in healthcare. 

Today, CTCPS has a very active and passionate Board of Directors.  Because our financial support comes from a variety of well-chosen sources, we remain non-conflicted and truly representative of the consumer voice and perspective in all of our activities.  Our educational activities have included presentations to nursing, medical and health science students statewide, to legislators at events at the Legislative Office Building, to hospital personnel whose care covers our statewide population including underserved populations, and to community groups at Senior Centers and elsewhere.  We continue our efforts to expand our outreach and educational initiatives as the current climate and focus on health care harm and the savings, in terms of unnecessary human suffering and actual costs, is a focus of many conversations in our state, our region and our country today.

Board Chair Statement

The Connecticut Center for Patient Safety (CTCPS) provides outreach and education to health professionals, students and the public in the areas of patient engagement and patient safety.  We are dedicated to supporting efforts that create safe healthcare environments. We assume this role by representing the patient voice at an advocacy level, by training providers, and by offering resources to patients. This work is a passion for every CTCPS supporter. We all understand the great efforts healthcare organizations make while also appreciating that too often they fall short. With an estimated 400,000 avoidable deaths every year in the United States, there is ample opportunity to create a safer healthcare environment for the people of Connecticut. CTCPS is one of the only non-conflicted patient safety groups actively partnering for change.

We have long worked to enhance the dialogue around what it truly means to make patients safe. We are proud to represent the patient voice on an array of state committees and national settings. However, it is the work that we do at the local level that has us most motivated. In the last year, CTCPS has taken our knowledge and years of partnering with universities to create a comprehensive workshop that helps all health science students understand the significance of their future role, connects them deeply to their purpose, and shares practical tools to provide better care. While this is obviously rewarding at a governance level, it is also deeply gratifying at a personal level.

In 2008, my first born daughter died from a congenital heart defect. During her 6 months of life I saw the good, the bad, and the ugly of healthcare first hand. I was struck by the juxtaposition of quality from shift to shift- my daughter had some of the most incredible care givers anyone could ask for but also had individuals who either lacked the skills or regard to provide the care she deserved. It was this contrast that motivated me to get involved in healthcare. Unlike many of my colleagues at CTCPS, my daughter’s death cannot be directly related to medical error (while there were a series of medical errors during her care), but my motivation to create a healthcare system that is safe for patients is just a strong. Each of our loved ones deserves the best care…every time.

At CTCPS we continue to actively advance our mission but we are hampered by 3 things. First, we are a small organization with limited resources. A second issue facing our organization from both a fundraising and operational level is that people often learn of us after they have had a less than positive experience with the healthcare system or have experienced medical harm. A third issue facing us is that it is difficult, as an outsider, to develop a true partnership within the healthcare field.

We hear too often about mistakes and errors in healthcare. We know that medical professionals want to do their best. We know that patients want to be free from harm. The Connecticut Center for Patient Safety sees itself as a convener around this topic, providing support for the creation of the next right answer for provider and patient alike. Bottom line, we want to make sure that all of our families get the best care they can possibly receive when they need it.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Health Care / Alliances & Advocacy
Secondary Organization Category Public Safety, Disaster Preparedness and Relief / Research Institutes & Public Policy Analysis
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
The Connecticut Center for Patient Safety serves all residents of Connecticut. We are also involved at some national level healthcare policy organizations.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments The Connecticut Center for Patient Safety exists because there was a void.  Patients, their needs, and their conditions were being discussed by everyone but patients.  Our organization was formed as a patient advocacy organization to bring patients and the patients voice to every conversation in healthcare - as equal participants.  We see ourselves as partners in achieving health care quality throughout the industry and in significantly reducing health care harm.  We bring the patient narrative through patient stories told by the patients themselves.  We are one of the few non-conflicted patient voices in healthcare.
Programs
Description
We have an ongoing program that offers presentation workshops to nursing students throughout Connecticut.  Through these presentations, we bring facts about medical errors, the impact to people's lives through patient stories and we empower these future nurses to appreciate their important roles as natural patient advocates and in reducing medical errors. 
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.  

In the short term, we have programs that are offered to students going into various disciplines within healthcare and to patients that are designed, in part, to raise awareness and empathy for the value of patients as active and equal members of their care teams.  Our patient stories, most often told by patients themselves are a crucial part of this.

We also discuss the importance of communication and talk about the role of failed communication in many instances of healthcare harm as well as communication tools to help reduce this statistic.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.  

By sensitizing health care providers to the real consequences of medical harm and by creating a greater sense of empathy to the patient/person/family experience, we hope to change the culture of healthcare to one that is centered around patient safety in the broad sense of the word.  With all of the named strategies that are being incorporated into our healthcare systems, such as high reliability, overuse, underuse, hand hygiene, we are still seeing 400,000 deaths each year due to avoidable medical errors.  We believe that persons who are patients and their families must be more centralized in all of healthcare and a deeper awareness of their experience will advance this.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

All of our presentations are evaluated through the collection of written evaluations at their conclusions.  We measure the change in awareness and approach to the value of the personal patient experience.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Evaluation comments from students who attended our workshops included:

  • “I am now more certain than ever that this is what I want to do” 
  • “this gave me a whole new perspective on healthcare” 
  • “I really enjoyed this presentation & conversation amongst patients & receivers of care. It put into perspective the other side of the care we give & points out things we can work on.”
  • ”I really enjoyed the true story component. It made the experience so personal and real and more meaningful. ”
  • ”This was a very powerful seminar with amazing speakers. I wish every healthcare provider could attend this seminar. ”
  • ”Workshops like these give me hope for the future in healthcare. ”
  • ”This was an incredible workshop. I learned so much I will never forget.”
Description We also bring interactive workshops to medical students, residents and other health science students sharing the patient experience in healthcare through stories and teaching strategies to better communicate, reduce healthcare errors and to promote person-centered care and patient engagement in their careers. 
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.  

In the short term, we have programs that are offered to students going into various disciplines within healthcare are designed, in part, to raise awareness and empathy for the value of patients as active and equal members of their care teams.  There are many components of patient care and many components of patient safety.  As an organization that represents patients and future patients, we believe that healthcare harm is greatly reduced when the patient and their family are active and equal members of the health care team.  It is our objective to create a greater awareness and urgency of the need for culture change around these values in our healthcare systems by empowering healthcare students and newer clinicians, the future leaders of tomorrow through our educational programs.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.  

By sensitizing health care providers to the real consequences of medical harm and by creating a greater sense of empathy to the patient/person/family experience, we hope to change the culture of healthcare to one that is centered around patient safety in the broad sense of the word.  With all of the named strategies that are being incorporated into our healthcare systems, such as high reliability, overuse, underuse, hand hygiene, we are still seeing 400,000 deaths each year due to avoidable medical errors.  We believe that persons who are patients and their families must be more centralized in all of healthcare and a deeper awareness of their experience will advance this.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.  

All of our presentations are evaluated through the collection of written evaluations at their conclusions.  We measure the change in awareness and approach to the value of the personal patient experience.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.  

Evaluation comments from students who attended our workshops included:

  • “I am now more certain than ever that this is what I want to do” 
  • “this gave me a whole new perspective on healthcare” 
  • “I really enjoyed this presentation & conversation amongst patients & receivers of care. It put into perspective the other side of the care we give & points out things we can work on.”
  • ”I really enjoyed the true story component. It made the experience so personal and real and more meaningful. ”
  • ”This was a very powerful seminar with amazing speakers. I wish every healthcare provider could attend this seminar. ”
  • ”Workshops like these give me hope for the future in healthcare. ”
  • ”This was an incredible workshop. I learned so much I will never forget.”
Description Another important program that we offer is education to patients and family members to raise their levels of healthcare literacy in understanding insurance, access to health care, and safe navigation of the healthcare system.  We teach strategies to improve patient-provider communication and strategies to better understand and organize their health care information.
Population Served People/Families of People with Health Conditions / US /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. At the end of our workshops, patients will leave feeling more knowledgeable and empowered as demonstrated by the discussions and the evaluation comments.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. "An educated consumer is our best customer" - Sy Sims.  Mr. Syms was in the clothing business, but this concept applies to healthcare consumers also.  As patients become more informed, they are able to actively engage and participate in their healthy living and health care decisions.  Patients are the only ones who are there the whole time, and so their preferences and choices about their care are essential pieces of their health care plan.  Additionally, when patients are actively engaged in their care, medical errors are significantly reduced.  In past generations, clinicians often made decisions on behalf of patients, decisions which they believed were in the patient's best interest.  Patients accepted this.  Today, we know that those decisions were not always what the patients would have decided.  Patients benefit by education about how to organize their medical information, how to present questions and information to clinicians and how not to feel intimidated by their doctors.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We collect written evaluations at the end of every presentation.  They are always resoundingly positive for immediate benefits gained.  We are also repeatedly invited back to present at senior centers and the like due to the comments and requests that their staff receive.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.  A comment, typical of many, received after one of our community presentations recently was: 

“Your presentation, “Health Wisely” given to our Heritage Center attendees last week was so informative and really got us thinking about how to handle our medical care. I’m so glad that you came for your message was one that we needed to hear.” 

Our success is evidenced by our repeat invitations to empower community members and to inform them about various aspects of their healthcare management and experience. 
 
Description
We work within our communities to raise awareness about healthcare issues, pathways to obtain care, and healthcare literacy.  We promote programs addressing overuse, underuse and right use issues.  CTCPS is also concerned with addressing the gaps, particularly in underserved communities, that we determined exist in our research report Removing Barriers: Creating Health Care Access for Connecticut's  Newly Insured.  This report can be viewed on our website.
 

 

 
Population Served / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Representatives of our organization have been given seats on legislative task forces, on state and national policy committees, in national educational programs, as part of research projects and on local and national Patient and Family Advisory Councils, to name only a few.  Our regular input brings a perspective that has long been missing at these conversations and from which cultural and practical changes in healthcare often emanate.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. We envision our society where everyone has access to safe high quality health care. This includes many components, and our belief is that to achieve this goal, the "patient voice and perspective" must be represented at every table and in every conversation about healthcare delivery from the board room to the exam room. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Our input is respected and regarded and frequently leads to action items that directly impact changes in healthcare.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Some examples include: Involvement in Partnership for Patients, a CMS program, let to a significant reduction in medical errors and avoidable harm.  Involvement in Consumers Union Safe Patient Project has led to legislative awareness and ultimately changes that have been better for patients.  Involvement at the state hospital association has led to programs highlighting patient involvement in hospital councils.
Description

Throughout the history of CTCPS, we have developed and used patient narratives to support our work. Many of our members come to us after they have experienced a medical error or negligence and one of their greatest desires is to do something to prevent the same thing from happening to others. If we don’t learn from our mistakes, we are bound to repeat them. One of our major initiatives is to gather and share their experiences in many venues and in many formats from written to video. In addition to our various educational programs that include patient stories, we also hope to reach and connect with patients before they have stories to share and to educate them on becoming a more savvy health care consumer.

Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / People/Families of People with Health Conditions / People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. In the short term, we have programs that are offered to students going into various disciplines within healthcare and to patients that are designed, in part, to raise awareness and empathy for the value of patients as active and equal members of their care teams.  Our patient stories, most often told by patients themselves are a crucial part of this.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. By sensitizing health care providers to the real consequences of medical harm and by creating a greater sense of empathy to the patient/person/family experience, we hope to change the culture of healthcare to one that is centered around patient safety in the broad sense of the word.  With all of the named strategies that are being incorporated into our healthcare systems, such as high reliability, overuse, underuse, hand hygiene, we are still seeing 400,000 deaths each year due to avoidable medical errors.  We believe that persons who are patients and their families must be more centralized in all of healthcare and a deeper awareness of their experience will advance this.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.  All of our presentations are evaluated through the collection of written evaluations at their conclusions.  We measure the change in awareness and approach to the value of the personal patient experience.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Evaluation comments from students who attended our workshops included:

  • “I am now more certain than ever that this is what I want to do” 
  • “this gave me a whole new perspective on healthcare” 
  • “I really enjoyed this presentation & conversation amongst patients & receivers of care. It put into perspective the other side of the care we give & points out things we can work on.”
  • ”I really enjoyed the true story component. It made the experience so personal and real and more meaningful. ”
  • ”This was a very powerful seminar with amazing speakers. I wish every healthcare provider could attend this seminar. ”
  • ”Workshops like these give me hope for the future in healthcare. ”
  • ”This was an incredible workshop. I learned so much I will never forget.”
Program Comments
CEO Comments

Our organization is unique. We were founded by patients who experienced medical harm and recognized that patients did not have an organized voice in health care policy and treatment conversations in many matters involving patient care and patient safety.  Since then, the patient voice and perspective is sought after in more conversations.  But there are two problems.  There are still many conversations taking place that directly impact healthcare and patients and patients are not included, and there are relatively few true non-conflicted patient organizations that have no other agenda but to protect patients’ rights and promote patients' access to safe, high quality health care.  We are one of those relatively rare organizations with members and staff who are anxious and prepared to be involved.  While those who know us highly respect us, we are still not well enough known and the patient voice is still not included in many conversations.  We are working on promoting the educational and other services that we offer as well as the policy consulting expertise that we have available.

There are several challenges that we face in our work.  First, in our efforts to educate and empower patients, the challenge is that they often don't know what they don't know, they want to trust that their healthcare will be of high quality and safe and initially they believe that they "understand" our healthcare system.  It is not until they are faced with a complicated medical situation that they often realize that they need support.  We endeavor to reach all patients sooner in the process, before they realize that they want to learn how to be more empowered and engaged patients.

We believe that to change the culture of patient safety within our healthcare institutions, one of the strategies is to educate our young healthcare professionals, the healthcare leaders of tomorrow, about the impact of medical harm on people. We use our stories to emphasize the importance of true person-centered care, enhanced communication and other patient safety strategies to reduce harm.  Many healthcare systems are still reluctant to meaningfully involve patients directly in the solution. 

Patients are the most underutilized resource in healthcare and we are working to change that in Connecticut and nationally on behalf of Connecticut residents.  The fact that there are so many opportunities for patients and the patient voice to be involved in patient safety related initiatives creates many opportunities where CTCPS can meet the demand and fulfill the needs of the community.

CEO/Executive Director
Lisa Freeman
Term Start Jan 2015
Email Lisa.Freeman@ctcps.org
Experience

Years ago, after serious avoidable medical harm occurred during her husband's surgery, Lisa became his full-time caregiver for the remaining 18 years of his life. During this time, she learned the ins and outs of our healthcare system first hand.  Since 2010, she has taken numerous courses in patient safety and healthcare quality and has represented the patient voice and perspective at conferences and panels, holds a public seat on the CT Board of Nursing, and seats on several hospital patient and family councils.  Currently, she belongs to a number of state and national patient advocacy organizations, is and has been a member of various expert panels at the National Quality Forum, is currently a member on PCORI’s Improving Healthcare Systems Advisory Panel, AHRQ's Health IT Patient Safety Culture Technical Expert Panel and is a faculty member at the Academy for Emerging Patient Safety Leaders: The Telluride Experience where the attendees are medical, health science, graduate nursing students and resident physicians. By representing the patient voice, making sure that the patient perspective is part of all health care conversations, and by working together with all stakeholders, Lisa is committed to moving the bar and improving patient safety across the board. In 2014, Lisa was named one of 25 of the Nation's Best Practices in Patient and Family Engagement by the Caregiver Action Network.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 8
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate 1%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Plans & Policies
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Date Strategic Plan Adopted June 2016
Management Succession Plan? Under Development
Organization Policy and Procedures No
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Jean Rexford Apr 2004 - Dec 2014
Board Chair
Donal Alan Manning
Company Affiliation Planetree
Term July 2016 to June 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Sandy Cayo
Jean Rexford none
Gus Velez
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 2
Unspecified 0
CEO Comments
Our organization is very fortunate.  Related to our mission, those who have come to us as founders and subsequently as board members, volunteers and staff are passionate about our cause.  Often, though not exclusively, they or a loved one has experienced harm within our healthcare system.  All of us at the Connecticut Center for Patient Safety have a strong desire to take our life experience and the knowledge that we have gained to work in meaningful ways to improve healthcare and to do what we can so that others will not have to experience medical error.  We have energy that is often unmatched in other organizations due to how meaningful and relevant our work is to each of us.  Our board members are all involved in multiple organization activities from education to policy issues to fundraising.  Fulfilling our mission is part of who everyone is.
 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $105,000.00
Projected Expenses $101,995.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
IRS Letter of Exemption
CTCPS 501c3
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$8,420$36,263$218,614
Administration Expense$76,725$86,886$16,615
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.110.951.27
Program Expense/Total Expenses10%29%93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$86,167$76,821$83,335
Current Assets$86,167$76,821$83,335
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$70$185$267
Total Net Assets$86,097$76,636$83,068
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountConvery Community Healthcare Foundation $40,130Koskoff Koskoff & Bieder PC $20,000Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation $100,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountKoskoff Koskoff & Bieder PC $10,000Silver Golub & Teitell $20,000James L. Knight Foundation $25,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountPellegrino Family Charitable Foundation $10,000The Civil Justice Foundation $10,000Hartford Foundation for Public Giving $20,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1230.96415.25312.12
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments Our organization has a long history and we have filled a void in the healthcare landscape for many years.  Our uniqueness in the field of healthcare is one of the reasons we are here and it also presents a financial challenge to us.  We offer services and solutions to health care needs that are sometimes not initially realized, but once used, can't be done without.  Our financials are fairly consistent and stable.  We operate lean and strong, doing much with the funds that we have. As any non-profit knows, we could do so much more with more widespread financial support. 
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 857 Post Road
#220
Fairfield, CT 06824
Primary Phone 203 610-0610
Contact Email info@ctcps.org
CEO/Executive Director Lisa Freeman
Board Chair Donal Alan Manning
Board Chair Company Affiliation Planetree

 

Related Information

Ensure Health & Wellness

A healthy community is a rich community. When we enjoy good health, when we engage in wellness activities – and when we support people living with disease or disabilities -- there are profound physical and psychological benefits. Simply put, we are all stronger and happier. To support the health and wellness initiatives in your community is to put good health within reach of all.

Promote Civic Vitality

Greater New Haven’s vibrancy is linked to its communities’ support of its neighborhoods, public gardens and sports, as well as its commitment to the protection of its people and pets.