Connecticut Humane Society
701 Russell Road
Newington CT 06111-1593
Contact Information
Address 701 Russell Road
Newington, CT 06111-1593
Telephone (800) 452-0114 x
Fax 860-665-1478
E-mail info@CTHumane.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
The Connecticut Humane Society (CHS) is the leading resource in the state for companion animal welfare; enriching the lives of families and communities through adoption services, medical care, education, and prevention of cruelty. Four core values bring this mission to life: stewardship, quality care, community, and respect.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1881
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Gordon G. Willard
Board Chair Ellen Sharon
Board Chair Company Affiliation No Affiliation
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission The Connecticut Humane Society (CHS) is the leading resource in the state for companion animal welfare; enriching the lives of families and communities through adoption services, medical care, education, and prevention of cruelty. Four core values bring this mission to life: stewardship, quality care, community, and respect.
Background

Founded in 1881, CHS has a rich history of serving the people and pets of Connecticut. CHS maintains three shelters geographically spread across the state, with locations in Newington (northern and central CT), Waterford (eastern CT) and Westport (southwestern CT). Originally established in the state capitol (Hartford), CHS’ headquarters moved to Newington in 1959. In 1998, the present 30,000 square foot Newington shelter and Fox Memorial Clinic were unveiled, tripling our capacity to care for abandoned and abused pets, and expanding services to include a low-fee, full-service veterinary clinic for pet owners in financial need. Built in 1969, the 15,000 square foot Westport shelter was renovated in 2004 to best deliver animal care in a safe and healthy environment. A new, 7,600 square foot shelter was built in Waterford in 2011, doubling the size of the former 40 year old shelter and premiering state-of-the-art features with respect to animal care, enrichment, and infection control. CHS works tirelessly toward continuous improvement and implementing best practices in adoptions, sheltering, medical care, and fostering for the benefit of pets in our state.

Impact

The Connecticut Humane Society works tirelessly to help pets in need. A sampling of 2015 accomplishments follows:

- 5,513 adoptions (50% cats, 43% dogs and 7% small animals)
- 94% live release rate
- Decreased pets' average length of stay in our system from 19 to 12 days (getting pets into homes sooner!)
- Served 68 families and 137 pets via CHS' Pet Food Pantry 
- Assisted animal control officers across the state by accepting 512 pets into CHS' adoption program and offering medical favors for 234 additional pets
- CHS' nearly 400 volunteers contributed 19,951 hours of service 
- Examined, vaccinated, and provided surgical services to 8,284 pets via CHS' public low fee, full service Fox Memorial Clinic 
Needs

For most of our 135 year history, the entire country had more pets than homes available. Over population was rampant. Elderly, sick, and injured animals were euthanized to make space for healthy, more adoptable animals. Through unwavering spay/neuter programs and continuous public education, that trend has shifted and the birth rate of animals no longer exceeds the number of available homes. While this is true in CT, over population and active euthanasia still exist in other regions of the country.

This positive trend allows us to save animals needing specialized medical care, housing and emotional support. No longer having to deploy so many resources to address an overabundance of homeless animals, CHS has the opportunity and responsibility to care for and save animals with special needs, partnering with shelters where euthanasia remains a practice of necessity. With strong relationships with municipal pounds, shelters and animal welfare advocates throughout Connecticut as well as in the South, CHS is spearheading a new kind of future; one which saves the lives of the neediest animals. This requires expanded medical care, shelter housing that meets pets’ physical and emotional needs, and community education, warranting the community’s treasure (donations, both funding and supplies), time and talents (volunteers).

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Animal Related / Animal Protection & Welfare
Areas Served
Local
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other

The Connecticut Humane Society operates three animal shelters in Newington, Waterford, and Westport, and serves the entire state. Each of these shelters take in animals from individuals who can no longer care for them, as well as adopt out pets into new homes.

Programs
Description

We enrich the Connecticut communities we serve by placing safe, healthy companion animals in responsible, loving homes. Each pet in our care is fully vaccinated, spayed/neutered and thoroughly checked by our highly skilled staff of veterinarians.  Further, each pet is evaluated using a nationally known behavior analysis tool. Animals which are in need of training and/or behavior modification receive that prior to being placed for adoption in one of our three shelters (Newington, Westport, and Waterford).

Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. We strive to find a loving home for every pet. We serve over 6,000 pets each year, and have a 96% live release rate. Consequently, we have an exemplary low euthanasia rate in comparison to many communities across the country. We work hard to make sure potential adopters are the right fit for our pets; over 95% of our placements are permanent.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Program Success is monitored by the program director and the executive director. Quantitative and qualitative operating statistics are evaluated quarterly.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

The friendship and love each animal finds with a family is remarkable. If you have cherished a pet, then maybe you know all about the chemistry of love - that special bond which is unique to each pet and their human companion.

After many years enjoying the richness of travel, love and family, John found himself alone. His wife had passed away, his children had moved on into adulthood, and he had lost his beloved Westie, Bentley.

Despite being quite busy and fulfilled, John had a pocket of loneliness that echoed softly at the end of each day. With reluctance, he responded to his son’s urging and visited the Connecticut Humane Society. He went only to appease his son, but Cupid’s arrow had other plans. John’s son was waiting at the shelter with a small white dog who was furiously wagging a large brush tail. An older pup, Pippin had recently lost her owner to cancer. She had flat feet and only one front tooth, but she had a heart the size of Texas. Pippin took one look at John and affectionately licked his hand in a warm hello. With that gesture of kindness and friendship, John looked into Pippin’s deeply lashed eyes and fell in love.

Together, they went home that day and instantly began sharing mealtimes, errands and naps. John found himself talking about everything with Pippin, and described their bond like this, “I discovered that I am no longer me. It is now us. Together.” This dynamic duo lived in love with each other until John’s passing in 2015. Pippin went on to live with a close family friend. John’s son expresses his gratitude like this, “While they only had a few years together, Pippin made all the difference in my dad’s life. I know that when my dad died, he had thoroughly enjoyed his last few years, and for that I am forever grateful.

Description

Our actions and decisions are based on providing the best medical and shelter care services to the most animals. We respect the life of each individual animal, while focusing on the welfare of staff, community and the animal population as a whole.

Our shelter medicine program provides vaccinations, spay/neuter and other surgeries and wellness care to the animals in our shelters.

In addition, our Medical Support Program delivers complimentary medical services to pets at municipal Animal Control facilities (ACO) that range from vaccinations and spay/neuter, to more advanced surgical procedures. Pets are then placed in one of the Connecticut Humane Society’s (CHS) adoption centers or returned to the animal control agency for adoption.

CHS also operates the Fox Memorial Clinic, a public clinic offering low fee veterinary services for pets in the community.

Population Served / /
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Pet wellness is a priority at CHS. Fifty years ago, it was common (in Connecticut and across the nation) for the most fragile, ill and oldest pets to be euthanized. Thanks to the success of successful spay/neuter initiatives in New England, CHS now goes to great lengths to save the lives of each and every pet in our care, both in the shelter and in the medical clinic.

The Medical Support Program is funded largely by private donations and grants. Although it is in its infancy stage, we have built a sustainable business model and maintain it as an integral part of our long term success.

The Fox Memorial Clinic is funded via fee for service, private donations and grants. Its weekly appointment schedule is booked solid, even without advertising, proving that the community need for discounted veterinary services is great. We have an expansion built into our strategic plan.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Program Success is monitored by the program director and the executive director. Quantitative and qualitative operating statistics are evaluated quarterly.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Tony, a 5 year old dog, was found wandering by Bridgeport animal control. As the animal control officer (ACO) approached him, it was obvious something was wrong - there appeared to be chemical burns on Tony’s back feet and he was possibly blind.

Tony needed immediate medical attention, so the ACO brought him to our Westport shelter. A staff veterinarian determined he needed to be transferred to CHS’ medical center in Newington for treatment. A full medical exam revealed that he had a hernia, broken teeth, possible chemical burns on his hind paws, and serious eye issues. What had Tony gone through? No one will ever know for sure.

Within days, Tony had surgery. His hernia was repaired, left eye removed, teeth fixed, and chemical burns cleaned. He would need a few weeks of recovery and observation in the medical department before he would be ready for a new home.

Following a TV appearance, Tony found a home the very next day with a family accustomed to special needs dogs. There he is truly king of the castle!

Description

An informed community is key to the prevention of cruelty and neglect of companion animals. The Connecticut Humane Society (CHS) works to carry out this effort through education and outreach to animal welfare professionals and children alike.

Animal Welfare University (AWU) is a professional development program that provides animal welfare professionals (i.e. animal control officers and animal shelter/rescue partners statewide) with the knowledge, tools, skills, and resources to effectively meet the demands of their profession. With proper training, animal welfare professionals are better equipped to avoid mistakes, prevent suffering and the spread of illness, safely handle animals, and ultimately save more lives.

Humane education programming in schools is nearly nonexistent due to rigid curricula shaped around standardized testing. CHS provides speakers upon request to school age groups, scouting clubs, and even adult service organizations. The Connecticut Humane Society relies on a strong corps of highly trained volunteers, as well as staff members, to fulfill these requests.

Population Served / /
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. AWU is a fairly new program, launching in August 2014. That said, it began with a strong showing of support and continues to strengthen with each program offered. In order to strengthen the long term outlook, we have a community outreach manager who is dedicated to building relationships with both Animal Control Officers and shelter partners. In addition to one-on-one communication, we also have held a series of lunch gatherings, for the purpose of networking, relationship building and to learn about specific program/educational needs. This is a one of a kind program, one which is setting best practices for animal welfare practitioners in New England, and across the country.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Program Success is monitored by the program director and the executive director. Quantitative and qualitative operating statistics are evaluated quarterly.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

AWU was launched on one of the most crucial topics in animal sheltering: infectious disease management. Dr. LeMac Morris, a renowned expert in assisting shelters with disease control protocols to minimize infectious disease, provided a two hour workshop to 50 animal welfare professionals from 28 towns.

Dr. Morris discussed evaluating disease transmission risks and developing policies to minimize infectious disease spread, proper use of cleaners and disinfectants, and strategic use of vaccines. Attendees were also put in contact with Boehringer Ingelheim’s Shelter Support Team so they could access future expertise and resources.

The AWU program was well received by workshop participants. Ninety percent of attendees ranked the workshop in the highest possible category of “very helpful.” All respondents felt that Dr. Morris conveyed an extremely knowledgeable expertise of the workshop topic; 88% indicated they would attend a future AWU offering.

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Gordon G. Willard
Term Start July 2010
Email info@cthumane.org
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 83
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 392
Staff Retention Rate 81%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 77
Hispanic/Latino 7
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 Indian
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 17
Female 69
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director of Development
Title CFO
Title Director of Operations
Title Director of Human Resources
Board Chair
Ellen Sharon
Company Affiliation No Affiliation
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Peter Cable No Affiliation, Voting
Gretchen Dale No Affiliation, Voting
LuAnn Giunta No Affiliation, Voting
William A. Haines, DVM No Affiliation, Voting
Eric Lopkin No Affilation, Voting
Steve Parker No Affiliation, Voting
JoAnn Roberts, Esq. No Affiliation, Voting
Christopher White No Affiliation, Voting
Leslie White No Affiliation, Voting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 5
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $6,383,281.00
Projected Expenses $9,660,802.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 5%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902015
Form 9902014
Form 9902013
Audit Documents
2015 Audit2015
2014 Audit2014
2013 Audit2013
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Tax Exempt Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Revenue$10,283,611$11,390,052$9,979,008
Total Expenses$8,331,506$7,357,530$6,926,519
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$3,329,191$3,310,824$3,232,387
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$131,988$146,256$123,054
------
$2,060,588$2,009,691$2,009,254
Investment Income, Net of Losses$4,680,481$5,913,694$4,586,269
Membership Dues------
Special Events$42,426----
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$38,937$9,587$28,044
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$6,694,332$5,927,633$5,667,024
Administration Expense$910,616$898,355$794,314
Fundraising Expense$726,558$531,542$465,181
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.231.551.44
Program Expense/Total Expenses80%81%82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue21%15%14%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$79,423,632$81,966,494$78,065,873
Current Assets$592,097$1,334,653$1,089,334
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$373,148$512,266$411,002
Total Net Assets$79,050,484$81,454,228$77,654,871
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountHartford Foundation for Public Giving $66,486Hartford Foundation for Public Giving $61,737Hartford Foundation for Public Giving $54,645
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCommunity Foundation of Eastern Connecticut $35,000Leona Bothmer Foundation $30,000Leona Bothmer Foundation $30,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountLeona Bothmer Foundation $25,000U.S. Trust $12,000ASPCA $5,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.592.612.65
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments The difference between the current fiscal year projected income and projected expenses is covered by income from a board-designated unrestricted fund. This fund allows CHS to have a predictable stream of funding for operating programs while investing the balance to ensure CHS remains sustainable and vibrant in the future.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

This organization receives designated funds from The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven and has completed an abbreviated profile.

Address 701 Russell Road
Newington, CT 061111593
Primary Phone 800 452-0114
Contact Email info@CTHumane.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Gordon G. Willard
Board Chair Ellen Sharon
Board Chair Company Affiliation No Affiliation

 

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