Aid for Orphans Relief Foundation
1952 Whitney Ave, 3rd Floor
Hamden CT 06517-1209
Contact Information
Address 1952 Whitney Ave, 3rd Floor
Hamden, CT 06517-1209
Telephone (475) 2270240 x
Fax 203-8481777
E-mail Info@aidorphansrelief.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
To provide orphans and other at risk children, around the globe and here in Connecticut, with proper healthcare, nutrition and wellness treatments that would otherwise be unavailable.
A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.
Aid for Orphans Relief Foundation (AORF) is working with its partner, The John J. Driscoll United Labor Agency (ULA) to expand a weekend food assistance program at the Charles F. Hayden Day School at Boys and Girls Village in Milford. The school is a special education facility that assists over 90 children in crisis, ages 5-21 years, by providing comprehensive, therapeutic educational services. Our two organizations secured funds to offer the weekend food assistance program for 7 food insecure children and their families for academic year 2016-17. We are looking for funds to continue and expand the program to serve 10 families in the (2017/18) school year.
A Great Opportunity Ending Date 31 2017
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2010
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Margaret Chustecki MD
Board Chair Dr. Margaret I. Chustecki
Board Chair Company Affiliation Internal Medicine of Greater New Haven
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission To provide orphans and other at risk children, around the globe and here in Connecticut, with proper healthcare, nutrition and wellness treatments that would otherwise be unavailable.
Background
Dr. Margaret Chustecki, M.D., MBA, started AORF after discovering firsthand the terrible plight of orphans in her homeland, Poland. From her internal medicine practice in Hamden, CT, she began reaching out to organizations to receive donated and reduced-cost products (medicines, medical products, vitamins, immunizations, nutritional products, and personal hygiene products) and getting them to Polish orphanages run by the Sister Servants of Many. Soon other organizations serving orphans or at-risk children were asking for help. Since 2010, AORF has distributed over $3M worth of medicines and medical supplies to thousands of impoverished and needy children around the world, serving children  unlikely to be helped by bigger, more well-known organizations like Save the Children. In 2014, AORF also began efforts to reduce food insecurity in Connecticut schoolchildren. We were deeply troubled by the fact that although Connecticut is among the richest states, one in five of our children live in a food insecure household. Although AORF began by serving orphans we have, almost from the beginning, broadened our mission to help not only orphans, but vulnerable children in general get the health-related supplies they need to survive and thrive. 
 
AORF is run out of Dr. Chustecki's internal medicine office and run by a small staff, thus keeping our overhead costs extremely low. Dr. Chustecki and four part-time employees (a grant-writer; an administrative assistant; a person who receives, sorts, tracks, packs and ships products; and a development person for special projects) do the work of the foundation. 
 
We reach out often to other nonprofits for advice and counsel and have partnered with two of them to accomplish our goals. For our work to help alleviate food insecurity in Connecticut schoolchildren we have partnered with the John J. Driscoll United Labor Agency (ULA) in Rocky Hill.  
Impact
AORF has two arms: an international arm that distributes medicines, medical supplies, personal hygiene items, and/or nutritional products to impoverished orphans and other at-risk children around the world, and a local, Connecticut arm that provides weekend food assistance to schoolchildren and their families. Our top three accomplishments in the past year were: 1) Delivering over $1M of medical products to needy children in Poland, Ukraine, Philippines, and Africa (Kenya); 2) Maintaining our comprehensive food assistance programs at the SAND School in Hartford and Church Street School in Hamden for the 2016/17 school year; and 3) Starting a comprehensive weekend food assistance program at the Charles F. Hayden Day School at the Boys & Girls Village in Milford.
 
AORF's top four goals for the current year are as follows: 1) To increase our Board of Directors and Advisory Board's influence on fund raising and shaping the direction of the organization; 2) To maintain the amount of product delivery for our international programs; 3) To continue our food assistance programs at Church Street School, SAND School, and the Hayden Day School in the 2017/18 school year; and 4) To open one, and possibly two, new weekend food assistance programs in New Haven in the 2017/18 school year.
Needs First, AORF needs to continue to raise the money needed to run our weekend food assistance programs. In academic year 2015-16 we ran two programs with our partner the John J. Driscoll United Labor Agency (one in Hartford (SAND School) and one in Hamden (Church Street School)). This academic year 2016-17 we continued to offer those programs and added one in Milford (the Charles F. Hayden Day School at Boys and Girls Village). Currently we are looking for funds to continue these three programs in 2017-18 and additionally, searching for funding for one, and possibly two New Haven schools. Secondly, AORF needs to continue to find funds to pay for operating costs that, at the moment, are heavily supported by donations from Dr. Margaret Chustecki. Included in these operating costs is the cost of shipping supplies in our international programs. Finally, we would like to continue to shape our Boards (Board of Directors and Advisory Board). We have made two important changes to our Boards this year and we continue to evaluate need for further changes.
CEO Statement To date AORF goals have been relatively simple -- to get as many products as possible to impoverished children. We try each year to increase the help we give to our existing programs. Currently, in addition to our medical shipments programs, we are also committed to increasing the number of weekend food assistance programs in the state of Connecticut for food insecure schoolchildren. When this problem came to our attention we simply could not turn our backs. Although there are many weekend backpack programs in our state, the need far outstrips the availability of programs. Although most people are aware that poor children can get free or reduced-cost meals at school, many people do not realize that food insecure schoolchildren often do not have enough food when school is not in session, including weekends and summers.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Health Care / Health (General and Financing)
Secondary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Fund Raising & Fund Distribution
Areas Served
Hamden
Milford
State wide
National
International
AORF serves orphans and other at-risk children in Connecticut (currently Hamden, Milford and Hartford) and Kentucky. Internationally we help children in Eastern Europe (Poland and Ukraine), Asia (Philippines), and Africa (Kenya and Cameroon).
Programs
Description In partnership with the John J. Driscoll United Labor Agency, AORF offers  weekend food assistance programs at three Connecticut schools: Church Street School in Hamden, Charles F. Hayden Day School at Boys and Girls Village in Milford, and SAND School in Hartford. An additional program is being planned at the John C. Daniels Magnet School in New Haven. The programs involve a comprehensive approach to addressing food insecurity by 1) providing weekend food for the entire family, 2) providing as much fresh food as possible, 3) linking families to other food and social services for which they might be eligible, and 4) evaluating the effects of the program on family use of services, household food security, and child school attendance and grades.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Completion and compliance rates
Parental report of level of food security
Parental report of use of services/benefits
School report of participant grades and attendance 
Description AORF distributes medicines, medical supplies, nutritional products, personal hygiene products, immunizations and vitamins to orphans and other at-risk children around the world. Currently we are helping children in Eastern Europe (Poland and Ukraine), Asia (Philippines), Africa (Kenya), and the U.S. (Connecticut and Kentucky). AORF maintains strong partnerships with agencies on the ground who distribute these items that are generously provided by organizations, companies and private donations in the United States.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
CEO/Executive Director
Dr. Margaret Chustecki MD
Term Start July 2010
Email Margaret.chustecki@yale.edu
Experience Dr. Chustecki is a staff physician for Yale New Haven Hospital, Assistant Clinical Professor at the Yale School of Medicine and the Managing Director of Internal Medicine of Greater New Haven.

A native of Poland, she was inspired to establish the organization after visiting Polish orphanages and seeing firsthand the dire need for health and medical supplies.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 4
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Grant Writing Director
Experience/Biography Dr. Schilling has been writing grants for AORF for two years. Prior to that she was a career nursing academic at both Yale University School of Nursing and UMASS Worcester Graduate School of Nursing.
Experience/Biography Lauragene joined AORF on a part-time basis in January, 2016 as a Consultant for Special Projects. A lawyer by training, Lauragene practiced law for twenty years before pursuing a career in development. She worked for 12 years in the development office at Yale University before opening a consulting practice. At present she is seeking funding sources for AORF’s program treating malnutrition in an orphanage in Kenya.
Collaborations
AORF currently has one collaborator. In carrying out its work to provide weekend food assistance to Connecticut schoolchildren AORf collaborates with the John J. Driscoll United Labor Agency (ULA) in Rocky Hill. The ULA actually delivers the weekend food assistance programs. In this collaboration, AORF and ULA identify and communicate with the schools targeted to get a program, AORF writes the grants, both programs seek donations, and AORF oversees the programs to comply with donor requirements and conducts the program evaluations.
 
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
2015 Community Champion AwardState of Connecticut2015
Comments
CEO Comments

I am pleased with what our organization has been able to do in just six years. Initially, all our efforts went into the product distribution aspect of our foundation, and we have been able to get over $4M worth of medicines and medical supplies to orphans and other at-risk children around the world since we began our work. We are also happy with our successes on the local front here in Connecticut where, since 2014, we have been able to fill an unmet need by starting three weekend food assistance programs to help food insecure schoolchildren/families. We hope to start a fourth (our first ion New Haven) in the 2017/18 school year. We found a partner who was already successfully delivering a weekend food program (the John J. Driscoll United Labor Agency in Rocky Hill) and who had the capacity to expand anywhere in the state if AORF could help find the funds to do so. Together we tweaked a model of weekend food assistance that not only provides the needed weekend food for the entire family, but also proposes to help families become more food secure over the long haul by linking them to other food assistance programs for which they might be eligible and services (mental health, employment, budget management, immigration, health care, heat assistance) that address the underlying cause of food insecurity: poverty. I would also like to address the mistaken idea of some that we are duplicating weekend food assistance services. It is estimated that over 150,000 Connecticut children live in food insecure households. Food insecure schoolchildren have access to free or reduced-cost meals at school but remain vulnerable to hunger on weekends and during summers. Although there are weekend backpack programs in the state, our best estimate is that somewhere between 5-10% of the children who need a weekend backpack program are currently enrolled in one. In our part of the state, the Connecticut Food Bank fed 3300 schoolchildren last year, but have 18 schools on their list of schools waiting for a program. Our biggest issue is that the needs for both our programs (local and international) outstrip our resources. We are grateful to all our donors, yet we are constrained by the limits of our fundraising. We are continually looking for ways to become more adept and successful in competing for funds to support our work.

Margaret Chustecki, MD, MBA

Executive Director and Chairman of the Board of Directors
Board Chair
Dr. Margaret I. Chustecki
Company Affiliation Internal Medicine of Greater New Haven
Term July 2016 to June 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Alex Cort Clinical Insights, LLC
Ms. Saira Malik Cool River Associates
Ms. Lisa A. Stanger Esq.Jewish Foundation of Greater New Haven
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 4
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 3
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Mr. John Beirne Jr.Beirne Wealth Management
Ms. Jan Bershtein Esq.Bershtein Bershtein & Bershtein
Mr. John Esposito Esq.Esposito Law Firm
Ms. Robin French CPAT.M. Byxbee Co., P.C.
Dr. Michael Imevbore Lung Associates of Connecticut
Dr. Roman Khodzinskiy Internal Medicine of Greater New Haven
Ms. Sharon Merzwa American Heart Association
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $1,924,630.00
Projected Expenses $147,600.00
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902015
Form 9902014
Form 9902013
Form 9902012
Audit Documents
Audit2015
Audit2014
Audit2013
IRS Letter of Exemption
AORF IRS Determination
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$1,028,240$973,445$577,984
Administration Expense$25,525$25,775$3,833
Fundraising Expense$66,348$90,826$42,420
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.990.981.04
Program Expense/Total Expenses92%89%93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue6%8%7%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$7,768$12,476$30,742
Current Assets$7,768$12,476$30,742
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$4,078$2,034$720
Total Net Assets$3,690$10,442$33,022
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountAmericares $554,505Blessings International $52,020Americares $386,050
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCatholic Medical Missions Board $396,717Grifols Worldwide Operations $14,522Catholic Medical Missions Board, Inc. $78,618
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountBrothers Brother Foundation $35,478Sasco Foundation $5,000 --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.906.1342.70
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 1952 Whitney Ave, 3rd Floor
Hamden, CT 065171209
Primary Phone 475 2270240
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Margaret Chustecki MD
Board Chair Dr. Margaret I. Chustecki
Board Chair Company Affiliation Internal Medicine of Greater New Haven

 

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