CT Community Nonprofit Alliance
75 Charter Oak Ave
1-100
Hartford CT 06106-1903
Contact Information
Address 75 Charter Oak Ave
1-100
Hartford, CT 06106-1903
Telephone (860) 525-5080 x1024
Fax 860-525-5088
E-mail kspringsted@ctnonprofitalliance.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
CT Community Nonprofit Alliance's mission is to advocate and build capacity for community-based, nonprofit organizations that strengthen and sustain healthy communities.
The new organization has the following strategic commitments:
1. Build the capacity of our members to be vibrant, financially stable and to achieve excellence.
2. Advocate to ensure that the vital role of nonprofits (our members) is valued and fully supported by public policy and adequate funding.
3. Be a primary resource for our members and stakeholders.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1980
Former Names
Connecticut Community Providers Association
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Gian-Carl Casa
Board Chair Mr. Peter DeBiasi
Board Chair Company Affiliation The ACCESS Agency, Inc.
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
CT Community Nonprofit Alliance's mission is to advocate and build capacity for community-based, nonprofit organizations that strengthen and sustain healthy communities.
The new organization has the following strategic commitments:
1. Build the capacity of our members to be vibrant, financially stable and to achieve excellence.
2. Advocate to ensure that the vital role of nonprofits (our members) is valued and fully supported by public policy and adequate funding.
3. Be a primary resource for our members and stakeholders.
Background

CT Community Nonprofit Alliance represents over 500 nonprofit organizations and is committed to building the capacity of our members to ensure they are vibrant, financially stable and able to achieve excellence. Our organization advocates to ensure the vital role of nonprofits is valued and fully supported by public policy and adequate funding.

CT Community Nonprofit Alliance was formed on February 1, 2016 as a result of a merger between Connecticut Association of Nonprofits (CT Nonprofits) and Connecticut Community Providers Association. Nonprofits are an essential and integral part of communities across the state and contribute to the quality of life that people in Connecticut hold so dear. This merger creates a new organization that is more robust and can more effectively advocate for the half-million individuals our members serve every day, in every city and town in Connecticut. Working together, we will achieve economies of scale, expand member training, group purchasing and other business opportunities, and maximize limited state dollars.

Connecticut Association of Nonprofits (CT Nonprofits) was the largest membership organization in the state dedicated exclusively to working with nonprofits in Connecticut. By connecting organizations with information, education, advocacy and collaboration, the organization helped members focus their energy on the people and communities they serve.

Connecticut Community Providers Association (CCPA) was the premier state trade association representing over 100 organizations that provide health and human services for children, adults and their families in the areas of mental health, substance use disorders, intellectual disabilities, and child and family health and well-being.

Impact #PeopleMatter Campaign - CT Community Nonprofit Alliance led the charge advocating on behalf of our members and beyond. Our Policy team testified, tracked and analyzed close to 440 bills, issues and amendments, and helped many of our members to write testimony. They rallied at the Capitol during “The Mother of All Lobby Days” and participated in press conferences and legislative meetings.
 
13th Annual Nonprofit Conference in 2015 was our most successful yet, bringing together over 600 nonprofit professionals and 40 sponsors for a day of seminars, knowledge sharing and networking.
 
Education - CT Community Nonprofit Alliance conducted over 120 nonprofit workshops throughout the state last year on a variety of topics, educating more than 1,500 people. 
 
CT Nonprofit Center -  The Center grew from 4 nonprofit tenants to 26 in just under 18 months, the projected size for 2019. More than 200 employees call the Center home and share space, resources and services. Center member organizations collaborate to shape the future of the Center and to ensure it meets its community impact goals. The Center acts as a meeting center for community nonprofits and provides visitors and tenants with state-of-the-art meeting technology. 
   
2016 Goals: 1) To successfully complete the legal, financial, and administrative tasks required to merge the two legacy organizations; 2) To complete a strategic planning process for the new organization; 3) To establish and execute an effective public policy advocacy agenda for the nonprofit sector; and 4) To expand the capacity to meet member organization’s training and professional development needs.
Needs

As the newly merged organization is further developed, it is critical that we maintain the current level and quality of services we provide to both our membership and the nonprofit community at large. Merger success hinges on the new organization’s ability to manage one-time expenses. Transitional support is sought to defray one-time merger-related costs including: Branding $60,000 to create a branding strategy, logo, messaging, website, collateral and a strategic marketing and communication plan; Strategic Plan $20,000 to create a strategic plan for the newly merged organization, post hiring of a permanent CEO; Technology Infrastructure $50,000 to focus on the migration and consolidation of separate information systems, telecommunications, email, and member services platforms; and Office Consolidation $25,000 as we move toward co-location of staff to one-location we will incur moving fees, reconfiguration fees, and furniture expense. Support for the the Transition of the dues structure, $190,000 due to a different methodology. 

CEO Statement

On February 1, 2016, Connecticut Association of Nonprofits (CT Nonprofits) and Connecticut Community Providers Association (CCPA) merged to become CT Community Nonprofit Alliance. CT Nonprofits and CCPA each enjoyed a more than 35 year history of promoting the health, well-being, vibrancy, and social welfare of the 169 communities that comprise the State of Connecticut.

CT Nonprofits and CCPA board leaders believed that bringing the two organizations together would enable us to serve as the most influential advocate for the state’s nonprofit sector as well as the 500,000 Connecticut residents the more than 515 member organizations serve together.

We have begun in earnest the work of building a new, bold, and transformative organization that can speak with a single voice to the values that the nonprofit sector embraces and the many ways that nonprofit organizations contribute to the well-being of, and quality of life for, Connecticut citizens. This unification also serves to eliminate unproductive and unhealthy competition between the two legacy organizations, increases operating efficiencies, and provides more robust services to help build the capacity of our members to better serve their communities. The merger has enabled us to more fully develop the organization to confront the threats to the viability of our members and take advantage of opportunities during a time when imagination, creativity, and nimble responsiveness are required, given the velocity of change.

Board Chair Statement

CT Community Nonprofit Alliance may be a new organization, having come into existence a mere few months ago, but it is built on a very strong foundation. There is continuity of mission, values, staff resources, and volunteer leadership. The new board of directors is comprised of individuals who served for many years on committees and boards of the two legacy organizations, The Connecticut Association of Nonprofits and Connecticut Community Providers Association. We carry on the tradition each Association established of a strong governance structure that provides numerous opportunities to involve and include our more than 515 member organizations.

We enjoy a remarkably clear mandate from our members who voted nearly unanimously for the merger. I know I speak for my fellow board members that we take extremely seriously our responsibility to lead this organization into the future and continuously find new and better ways to support and strengthen the nonprofit sector and the Connecticut community it serves.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Management & Technical Assistance
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Alliances & Advocacy
Tertiary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Management & Technical Assistance
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
CT Community Nonprofit Alliance is a statewide organization, with 18% of total nonprofit organization membership (91 members) having headquarters in the Greater New Haven area. Many of our state wide member organizations also provide services to New Haven County, but that specific service data is not tracked at this time.
CT Community Nonprofit Alliance also hosts 10% of it's educational offerings  in New Haven County, providing more than 200 people with professional development opportunities. 
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments Gian-Carl Casa - President/CEO 
Programs
Description

CT Community Nonprofit Alliance, Inc. is the collective voice of community providers and nonprofits in Connecticut. We champion their causes and represent their interests at the Legislature, with the Administration, state agencies that contract with community providers, the media, and with other related advocacy organizations throughout the state. CT Community Nonprofit Alliance's voice helps protect private provider funding, advances new funding initiatives and public policies, support strategies for long-term system reforms, and advocates for policies that support the community provider system and the needs of the people it serves.

Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

CT Community Nonprofit Alliance led the charge advocating on behalf of our members and beyond. Our Policy team tracked and analyzed close to 440 bills, issues and amendments, and helped many of our members to write testimony.  As part of the #PeopleMatter movement, CT Community Nonprofit Alliance  helped to organize a rally at the Capitol during “The Mother of All Lobby Days” and participated in press conferences and legislative meetings. 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Continuing to grow our coalition of advocates and increasing member engagement will allow us to continue to be a powerful voice in the state and help us to protect the nonprofit sector. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Utilize quantifiable data which shows how many bills have been tracked, number of individuals who submitted testimony and attendance at public policy meetings and advocacy workshops. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. CT Community Nonprofit Alliance has seen a steady increase in engagement from our members. Public Policy meeting has seen a substantial growth in attendance, our organization hosted two Advocacy Day conferences, which were attended by more than 175 people and we helped to organize rallies at the Capitol, which brought out more than 500 sector workers to advocate. CT Community Nonprofit Alliance also is a part of the #PeopleMatter coalition, which utilized grassroots advocacy to fight budget cuts. 
Description

The Center for Professional Development (CPD), the training wing of CT Community Nonprofit Alliance, serves as one of the state’s premier training facilities. It emphasizes resources, tools, achievement and progress for the nonprofit sector at large. CT Community Nonprofit Alliance offers more than 100 nonprofit workshops each year across the state, including sessions focused on emerging nonprofit trends, leadership, finance, human resources, communications, fundraising and more. Our signature event, the Annual Connecticut Nonprofit Conference, draws over 600 nonprofit professionals for a day of networking and education.

Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. CT Community Nonprofit Alliance offers over 100 high quality, positively evaluated capacity building workshops a year, on an array of different topics to help ensure that the state's nonprofits are strong, stable and able to impact their communities. We aim to serve more than 2,000 individuals per year. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Help to create a more stable, effective and well funded nonprofit sector by hosting high quality capacity building workshops throughout the state designed to develop staff and provide a base of knowledge that can be easily translated into organization success. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. CT Community Nonprofit Alliance uses evaluations to track content, facilitator performance and overall effectiveness of the presentation. Moving forward as a new organization we will also incorporate an outcomes measurement section in our evaluations in order to help us establish a knowledge baseline for attendees and track their growth. We also utilize surveys of our membership to determine program effectiveness and the needs of the sector. Feedback from our training partners, as well as input from other capacity building organizations, also help guide the process. We also rely on data such as the amount of individual people served and organizations served. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. CT Community Nonprofit Alliance's training program ran over 100 workshops in the last year and served over 2,000 people throughout the state. Our evaluations from each event show a consistent level of success as our sessions rate above a 4/5, which indicates that attendees thought the material was effective and will make an impact at their organization. In the past year we also were able to produce a sold out annual conference with over 600 attendees, as well as two Advocacy conferences that drew over 175 people. 
Description

CT Nonprofit Center, a program of CT Community Nonprofit Alliance and located in Hartford, currently serves as ‘home’ to 26 nonprofit organizations and more than 200 employees who share space, resources and services. The Center is designed to provide opportunities for members to reap the benefits of significant cost savings while operating in a collaborative environment. Members of the Center gain the tools they need to accelerate their missions and deepen their impact. The Center serves as a meeting place for community nonprofits, providing state-of-the-art technology tools to help them better reach their constituents.

Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. In less than 2 years we have reached maximum occupancy. We currently have 26 nonprofit organizations being housed in the center, which is over double the national average for nonprofit centers. We’ve formed committees that meet monthly to explore security, facilities and collaborative issues, which gives tenants ownership over the center. We’ve also provided cost savings for our tenants with discounts on rent and technology. We calculate that small organizations have saved a total of $15,000 - $60,000 while larger tenant organizations have saved $30,000 - $115,000 each.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Continue to affect tenant organization's sustainability and impact by providing cost savings including identifying new resources/services to share such as equipment, technology and staff. Increasing collaboration to help with employee retention, increase organizational visibility and cut an eventual path towards programmatic collaboration. Adding space to the center in order to grow occupancy.

Increased collaboration, in order to move from resource sharing to programmatic collaboration. We also hope to continue to grow the space at the center in order to take on new tenants.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

We utilize evaluations, tenant interviews and host monthly tenant meetings which allow us to solicit feedback. We measure the number of organizations in the center, total number of employees and total number of individuals who visit the center for meetings, workshops and events. We also use formulas to calculate savings based on rent, shared technology, buildouts and service, which total $15,000 - $60,000 for smaller organizations and $30,000 - $115,000 for larger organizations. 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Rent

a. Lower than market rate rent = $3 less than market for this neighborhood

b. Reduced foot print by sharing conference room/kitchen/reception = on average $6,500 per year for organizations that rent less than 2,000 sq feet and $13,000 per year for organizations that rent more than 2,000 sq feet

c. Fixed rent – no annual increases – Savings of 2% each year on average = for small organizations $1,000 for 3 years for large organizations $3,000 for 3 years

Technology

a) Share highspeed fiber –organizations receive updated cabling, wifi, and highspeed fiber at no cost for installation. On average small organizations save $4,000 one-time costs and large $7,000

b) Monthly savings on internet and management of equipment for small organizations is $75 and for large $150

Buildouts

a) long-term lease tenants receive buildouts for free – average savings $40,000 for small and $80,000 for large organizations

Service

a) Shared reception - Annual savings $15,000 per organization

 
Description

In 1977, the Connecticut Legislature created a preferred purchasing program to address low employment rates for people with disabilities. The statute promotes employment opportunities for people with disabilities through government contracting. Through the program, individuals with disabilities render products and services as contracted by various state agencies, with employment supports from community providers. The association is certified as a Small Business Enterprise through the Department of Administrative Services Supplier Diversity Program. 

Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Connecticut saves over $2,000 per worker employed through the Preferred Purchasing program as the result of reductions in entitlement programs and increased tax payments. This benefit is in addition to the employment and training opportunities that it offers to each individual hired through the program.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Continue to provide work opportunities, work hours and wages for people with severe disabilities. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

1. Preferred Purchasing Program – provided providers offering employment services to individual with disabilities work opportunities through government contracts

a. There are twenty-two community rehabilitation programs with active state contracts through 17b-656. There are approximately 30 active organizations.

b. The total number of work opportunities created for people with disabilities in FY15 was 873 inclusive of the Qualified Partnership.

c. The program provided 277,229 hours of work, or 152 FTEs

d. Total wages for the program for people with disabilities was $2.95M. There are other, non-disabled workers who also gain employment.

e. The average hourly wage for workers with disabilities was $10.66 per hour.

f. Compliance for the program (law requires ratio of 75% workers with disabilities was above 80%.

Description

CT Community Nonprofit Alliance cultivates communication and cooperation among its member nonprofits and their employees by bringing them together through our policy division meetings and related forums, member events, and management roundtables. This effort ensures that they are sharing experiences, knowledge, challenges and ideas. In addition, we provide them with the most up to date information regarding sector trends and policy issues, while also providing access to white papers, resources and consultants who help them better serve their missions.

Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Served 1,500+ individuals through our education program. 600 People attended meetings at our CT Nonprofit Center in past year. We sent our exclusive newsletter, public policy updates and service offers to thousands on a weekly basis. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. By convening people we look to build a stronger coalition with a louder voice in the state. We also aim to ensure that nonprofit organizations are armed with the most up to date and important information that affects their organizations.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Track individuals who attend workshops, forums and roundtables. We implemented a new database to help track who is attending our events and receiving our communications. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Our multi-faceted approach to communicating the latest trends, outcomes and issues ensures that our members receive the most relevant information to help them succeed.

Our members receive exclusive newsletters, public policy updates and service offers on a weekly basis. Our vast database of non-member organizations receives monthly communications from our Center for Professional Development, and each quarter receive a copy of our electronic magazine, Nonprofit Advantage.

Social Media helps us to reach the largest possible audience with the most current information. As of June 2015 we had 8,423 Twitter followers, 1,707 Facebook fans and 469 members in our Linked In group. Each year these numbers continue to grow.

Press Coverage  was diverse and frequent with over 35 articles and op-eds in Connecticut’s most popular news outlets including the Hartford Courant, CT Mirror, CT News Junkie, Hartford Business Journal, NBC Connecticut, FOX 61 News, the CT Post and more.

Program Comments
CEO Comments

CT Community Nonprofit Alliance is addressing the challenges of merging two successful and vibrant membership organizations with rich and long histories. The main challenge is to address the needs of a highly diverse membership that comprises more than 500 organizations representing virtually every type of nonprofit that exists in Connecticut. The opportunity is for the merged Association to successfully meet member needs for capacity-building, advocacy, training and education, and access to goods and services, offered through the Association, that will save them money. CT Community Nonprofit Alliance’s strategy for addressing these needs includes: (1) engaging member organizations in committees, sub-sector divisions, forums, and roundtable discussions, (2) developing new and improved means of communication, including a new website, (3) optimizing electronic systems to enhance member services, including a powerful membership management information system, and (4) delivering enhanced policy and advocacy support through the combination of staff and consulting resources that the merger has made possible.

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Gian-Carl Casa
Term Start July 2016
Email gcasa@ctnonprofitalliance.org
Experience

CT Community Nonprofit Alliance is operating under the direction of newly hired President/CEO, Gian-Carl Casa,  Mr. Casa has a M.A. in Political Science from Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University.  Previous to his position with the Alliance he was the Undersecretary for Legislative Affairs -- State of Connecticut Office of Policy and Management and the Director of Public Policy and Advocacy -- Connecticut Conference of Municipalities (CCM).  

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 17
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 35
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate 79%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 14
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 11
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Ron Cretaro Sept 1979 - Dec 2015
Terry Edelstein Mar 1982 - Oct 2012
Senior Staff
Title Vice President of Administration and Finance
Title Director of Public Policy
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

Education & Training Collaborations: Fairfield County’s Community Foundation, CT Community Foundation, Community Foundation of NW CT, AFP CT, AFP Fairfield, Pro Bono Partnership, Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York, Hartford Foundation for Public Giving, Cigna, Travelers Championship, and dozens of consultants that are experts in the nonprofit sector and develop and deliver high quality trainings for discounted fees or for free. Cost Saving Programs: Travelers Championship, Travelers and CohnReznickPartner on the Birdies for Charity nonprofit fundraising program; More than 12 Endorsed Vendors who provide cost savings discounts and exclusive services to member organizations; #PeopleMatter Coalition -  A cross-sector coalition of advocacy associations, nonprofit service providers, organized labor and recipients of services who serve hundreds of thousands of Connecticut’s most vulnerable residents each year. CT Nonprofit Center partners and collaborators, Corporation for Independent Living (CIL), CT Center for Advanced Technology (CCAT, Hartford Foundation for Public Giving, Fund for Greater Hartford, State of Connecticut - Collaborative Incentive Grant.

Board Chair
Mr. Peter DeBiasi
Company Affiliation The ACCESS Agency, Inc.
Term Feb 2016 to Dec 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Andrea Barton-Reeves HARC, Inc.
Eric Dillner Shoreline Arts Alliance
Andrea Ferrucci Mosaic
Alice Forrester, Ph.D. Clifford W. Beers Guidance Clinic, Inc.
Robert Francis Regional Youth Adult Social Action Partnership
Heather Gates Community Health Resources
Denis Geary Jewish Association for Community Living
Steven Girelli Klingberg Family Centers
Luis Perez Mental Health CT
Michael Sandner Hartford Seminary
Barry Simon Oak Hill
Joseph Sullivan MCCA
Deborah Ullman YWCA Hartford Region
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 9
Female 5
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 0%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Blanket Personal Property
Business Income
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Computer Equipment and Software
Crime Coverage
Disability Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Fiduciary Liability
General Property Coverage
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Life Insurance
Liquor Liability
Medical Health Insurance
Special Event Liability
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Board Co-Chair
Andrea Ferrucci
Company Affiliation Mosaic, Inc.
Term Feb 2016 to Dec 2017
Email andrea.ferrucci@mosaicinfo.org
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Membership
Legislative
Audit
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $8,402,478.00
Projected Expenses $8,402,478.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

The Connecticut Association of Nonprofits and the Connecticut Community Providers Association merged in Feb. 2016.  This newly formed organization has not completed one full fiscal year.  The last few years of financial information (form 990s and audits) for the two organizations that merged to become the Alliance can be downloaded from this profile.

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by The Community Foundation.  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation requires three years of financial information from the nonprofit organization; however, this requirement may not be available for some organizations due to their more recent incorporation or formation. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 75 Charter Oak Ave
1-100
Hartford, CT 061061903
Primary Phone 860 525-5080 1024
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Gian-Carl Casa
Board Chair Mr. Peter DeBiasi
Board Chair Company Affiliation The ACCESS Agency, Inc.

 

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